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Slavery radio programmes – listen again

26 March 2007 by Karen

This weekend marked the bicentenary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade in the UK. Given Liverpool’s role in the trade there was strong media focus on the city, with the Merseyside Maritime Museum featuring heavily. The following radio programmes are available to ‘listen again’ by following the links.

The Sunday Programme on BBC Radio 4 was broadcast live from the Merseyside Maritime Museum. The programme looked at why some Christians supported slavery and others didn’t, slavery in Islam, Liverpool and the slave trade, and the legacy of slavery. 

Next Sunday Worship – Set All Free, also from the Merseyside Maritime Museum, featured Bishop of Liverpool, Rt Revd James Jones and Senior Pastor of the Temple of Praise Church, Dr Tani Omideyi. The Love and Joy Gospel Choir provided the vocals for a programme looking at the legacy of slavery in a city whose fortunes and success rested on the slave trade.

Also on Sunday, Radio Five Live’s Worricker Programme was broadcast from the Elmina fort in Ghana. Playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah visited the transatlantic slavery gallery at the Merseyside Maritime Museum and interviewed the keeper of the museum, Tony Tibbles, talking about the trade and the new slavery museum. Deputy PM John Prescott, Miss Dynamite and former Leeds and Ghanaian footballer, Tony Yeboah also featured.

BBC Radio Merseyside’s Claire Hamilton also focused on the trade and interviewed Richard Benjamin, keeper of the forthcoming International Slavery Museum.  Wayne Clark looked at the role of abolitionist, William Wilberforce, in his Daybreak programme. Keeper of the Maritime, Tony Tibbles, was also interviewed.

 

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