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Object dusting team at the Museum of Liverpool

21 November 2013 by Sam

man in a small crane dusting an old train in the museum

Jason from the object dusting team cleaning the boiler of ‘Lion’ locomotive

Here are some great photos from Chris Moseley, head of ship and historic models conservation at National Museums Liverpool, who has captured some of the behind-the-scenes life of the museums that visitors would never normally see. He explains:

“There is nothing worse when looking over a gallery balcony than to see a layer of dust, a lost pencil or a discarded leaflet. Such things are often out of reach of our regular cleaning staff, so we have a special team of ‘object dusters’ who clean those places high up in the gallery as well as the objects on open display.

This skilled work is carried out by Arthur, Jason and Fiona who use ladders and access equipment like the Star 10 pictured here. I caught up with the team one morning just as they were cleaning the 1830s locomotive ‘Lion’ in the Museum of Liverpool.

man in a small crane between museum display cases

Some careful manoeuvres between cases

Having completed that task Jason, perched high up in the platform, skilfully manoeuvred the machine between glass cases to clean the suspended glass sheets representing the ice age. They were overlooked by the skeleton of a pre-historic elk which was next in line to be dusted.

The team move between different National Museums Liverpool venues throughout the year and when they finish in the Museum of Liverpool they will be moving on to the Lady Lever Art Gallery on the Wirral.”

man in a small crane cleaning a high area of the museum display

Cleaning the ‘ice’ sheets that cascade down into The Great Port gallery, while the elk looks away!

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.