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UK Disability History Month – Caroline’s story

2 December 2013 by Kay

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Caroline’s story is our second instalment.

Caroline France (or Carol, as she liked to be known), was born in 1905 in Edge Hill; the eldest of 13 children. From the age of 13 she attended the School for the Blind Children’s Branch in Wavertree.

Aged 16, she went to the Hardman Street School, where she taught machine knitting, basket making and chair caning until 1957.

Carol dressed stylishly, enjoyed holidays and outings with her many friends, sang with church choirs and choral societies, and most of all loved her dogs.

Her friend Barbara Myers remembers, “Carol was dignified and comical, self-disciplined and rebellious. ‘You might as well as wish you had’ was one of her favourite sayings. I believe she died regretting nothing.”

Carol’s application forms for the School for the Blind Wavertree, 1918 and Hardman Street, 1921 are on display in The People’s Republic gallery, Museum of Liverpool.

Carol’s application forms for the School for the Blind Wavertree, 1918

Carol’s application form for the School for the Blind Wavertree, 1918

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