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Ian Berry in conversation

6 June 2011 by Sam

As part of the Look11 photography festival there has just been a big weekend of Magnum events at the International Slavery Museum. The Magnum Professional Practice course attracted photographers from across the country for two intense days of inspiring talks.

Magnum photographer Ian Berry, whose Living Apart exhibition is currently at the museum, arrived early on Friday evening for a free ‘in conversation’ event with National Museums Liverpool’s director of art galleries Reyahn King. It was a fascinating discussion, as Reyahn describes here:
Read more…

Ian Berry opens the Living Apart exhibition

8 April 2011 by Sam

Ian Berry in the Living Apart exhibition

Ian Berry at the opening of his exhibition

Living Apart: photographs of apartheid by Ian Berry is the latest in a strong and varied programme of exhibitions at the International Slavery Museum. It’s the venue’s second offering for the Look11 photography festival, providing a thought provoking counterpart to the insightful and uplifting ’42’ Women of Sierra Leone, which opened last month. It’s also the International Slavery Museum’s largest ever exhibition – with almost 100 photographs to fit in it has taken over the Maritime Museum’s usual exhibition space on the floor below. Read more…

An Ancient Egyptian Meadow in Liverpool?

11 July 2013 by Ashley Cooke

Photo of Mould and Pendant

Mould and jewellery pendant from excavations at Tell el Amarna (nos. 56.21.191 & 56.21.355)

The director of World Museum is working hard to create a Wildflower Meadow at the front of the museum. As I walked beside it today my eye was drawn to the bright blue cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus) and the pink to purple corncockle (Agrostemma githago) which reminded me of some of the floral jewellery we have in our Ancient Egypt Gallery. Read more…

Let’s keep Mandela legacy alive

10 December 2013 by Richard

green and yellow banner with the words Liverpool 8 against apartheid

Liverpool 8 Against Apartheid banner used in the 1980s.

Like millions of people across the globe I was saddened to hear the news that one of the great leaders of modern times – and a true freedom fighter – Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, affectionately known as Madiba, has passed away.  Such news is often hard to digest; things really don’t quite seem the same when someone of such stature, such presence and indeed familiarity is no longer with us.  But someone like Mandela will always leave an enormously influential legacy – in his case – hope rather than hate.   Even though he spent 27 years of his life in prison for his beliefs, fighting for political freedom and social justice, he still had the courage and character not to be engulfed by rage on his release from Robben Island in 1990. Read more…

The power of images

2 August 2011 by Richard

woman looking at framed photographs

Visitor at the Living Apart exhibition

Hello

Well there have been plenty of things happening here at the museum since my last blog post. We have launched three very successful and eclectic exhibitions: Living Apart: photographs of apartheid by Ian Berry; ’42’ Women of Sierra Leone, a series of photographs of Sierra Leonean women, highlighting the alarming fact that life expectancy for them is only 42 and Toxteth 1981, a community exhibition developed in collaboration with the Merseyside Black History Month Group to mark the 30th anniversary in July 2011 of the 1981 riots in Toxteth, Liverpool. The latter involved members of the Liverpool Black community who lived in Toxteth during the disturbances loaning photographic material for the exhibition. The images gave them a voice which I believe is very important if museums are to be truly seen as a resource by the local community in particular. Read more…

The trial of Lord Alfred Douglas – have your say! Guilty or not guilty?

15 January 2018 by Kay

smartly dressed man sitting at a table piled with books

Lord Alfred Douglas

Our third blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Peter Scott-Presland and Andrew Lumsden.

Peter and Andrew will be delivering an interactive presentation in which the audience will be invited to participate and to come to its own ‘verdict’.

They tell us more –

“The trial is a reinterpretation of events believed to be well-known. Alfred Douglas is thought of as Oscar Wilde’s Great Love, and they are tragically yoked together forever in Queer Myth. Peter will argue that on the contrary, Douglas was nothing less than a murderer, both physically and creatively. Andrew appears for the defence, seeing Douglas as a forerunner of the Gay Liberation Front”.

The full programme for the day at the Museum of Liverpool can be seen here
Read more…

50 is the magic number!

24 May 2017 by Paul Gallagher

Display case

The Beatles display in our Wondrous Place gallery. Image © Mark McNulty

We’re only days away from the first of Liverpool’s celebrations for the 50th anniversary of the release of the seminal album ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’. Read more…

Nichelle Nichols – an inspirational Afro Supa Hero

21 September 2016 by Sam

Star Trek action figure in original packaging

Lt Uhura figure, Star Trek. Courtesy of Jon Daniel. © Mego Toy Corporation and Paramount Pictures. 1974.

As the cult sci-fi series Star Trek celebrates its 50th anniversary this month it seems a fitting time to remember the ground-breaking nature of the original series and of one character in particular.

The show’s creator Gene Roddenberry brought together a diverse cast for the key roles to represent his dream of a future where all nations worked together in harmony for the good of the planet. The series might be set in space with a range of fantastical alien species but during the Cold War era it could have seemed just as unlikely to have the Russian officer Chekov working alongside his American colleagues on the bridge of the Starship Enterprise.

However, the most influential character of the 1960s series was probably Lieutenant Uhura, played by Nichelle Nichols. Read more…

Pop-art gift to the Walker!

15 July 2014 by Laura

People and painting

Senior NML staff welcome painting into collection. From L-R Sandra Penketh, Ann Bukantas John Entwistle, Ros McAlister, Phil Redmond and David Fleming

‘The Dinner Party’ by Sam Walsh has been on loan to the Walker for some time but we’re delighted to announce it has been formally gifted to us under the Cultural Gifts Scheme and is now part of our permanent collection. Read more…

38 days to go until the Games begin!

19 June 2012 by Lucy

Our wonderful volunteer Jamie McFadden has been blogging again. This time, he’s on the trail of Liverpool’s footballing Olympian.


Red or blue? It was gold for Arthur Berry…

Born in 1888, Arthur Berry was destined to be one of Liverpool’s most successful footballers, but not necessarily at Anfield or Goodison Park! Arthur’s stage was at the 1908 and 1912 Olympics. The first Olympics that Arthur Berry competed in were, like the 2012 Games, held in London. Playing alongside some of his previous team mates, he was part of the Gold medal winning football team. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.