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Does a free will-writing service sound of interest?

2 March 2017 by Alison

Painting of Emma Holt

Emma Holt donated Sudley House to the city of Liverpool. This painting of her is by Percy Bigland

If you are 55 or over you can get a will written for free this March.  Alison Crawford, our Legacy Fundraising Officer explains all about Free Wills Month and why leaving a gift to National Museums Liverpool in your will can make a real difference.

“Every March and October, the Free Wills Month campaign runs to encourage those who have yet to make a will or would like to make amendments to an existing will, to get in touch with an associated solicitor, and take advantage of a free will writing service. This campaign is open to members of the public aged 55 and over, and full details can be found via their website: www.freewillsmonth.org.uk

Thinking of the future and what we would like to leave as our legacy, is something that many of us don’t want to often consider. However, if the time is taken now to choose how you can make a difference by leaving a gift in your will, then you can rest assured, knowing that your wishes will be carried out and that your chosen charity will benefit from your kindness.

Paintings conservator at work in the studio

Kathryn is passionate about the conservation of art and has left a gift in her will to National Museums Liverpool. Here she watches our paintings conservator, David hard at work.

National Museums Liverpool has evolved in part through the generosity of others, for eg; the donation of Sudley House to the city of Liverpool by Emma Holt, to the stunning collections of Mrs Tinne’s Wardrobe.  In recent months, the Walker Art Gallery has received an extremely generous gift, and I am often humbled by the philanthropy of those who have chosen to support us.

Leaving a gift in your will is an incredibly personal decision, and National Museums Liverpool is very grateful to those who have decided to consider us in their future plans. To those who are may be a little undecided on how their gift can really make a difference, consider this:

However big or small, leaving us a legacy really can make a difference, so as the Legacy Fundraising Officer for National Museums Liverpool, I’d like to take this opportunity to say a huge thank you for thinking of us.”

Find out more about how to leave a legacy to National Museums Liverpool here or if you would prefer to speak to Alison, please call her directly on 0151 478 4995.

‘Trade’ – exhibition provides inspiration for new theatre venture

28 July 2016 by Alison

Jogini - wedding ceremony

Jogini – wedding ceremony

In June last year ‘Broken Lives – Slavery in Modern India’ opened at the International Slavery Museum, a powerful and moving exhibition revealing stories of hardship, survival and hope for broken lives mended.

The exhibition (open until 11 December), delivered in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, focuses on the victims of modern slavery in India, most of who are ‘Dalits’. Many Dalits still experience marginalisation and prejudice, live in extreme poverty and are vulnerable to human trafficking and bonded labour.

Feedback from visitors to the exhibition has been incredible, for one particular individual though their visit has left a lasting impression… Read more…

Is the age of the superhero dead?

29 June 2016 by Alison

Comic Con Batman

Image courtesy of MCM Expo Group

Ever since Jon Daniel’s Afro Supa® Hero exhibition opened in May, I’ve been fascinated by some in the media questioning whether the age of the superhero is dead.

In a recent Guardian interview with Roland Emmerich, the German Film Director made his views on the subject clear: Read more…

Freeing those trapped by the ‘bonds of debt’

26 January 2016 by Alison

Urmila (Indian lady) holds up her identity card

© Image courtesy of International Justice Mission: Urmila becomes a first time voter at the age of 75.

According to Hannah Flint, Regional Development Executive, North of England – INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE MISSION® UK: “There are two reasons why I have loved working for International Justice Mission (IJM); the people I work with, and the people I work for. My colleagues in IJM India work alongside local authorities to rescue thousands of victims of slavery and trafficking each year. Read more…

Telling the story

16 November 2015 by Alison

Indian girl with samll baby

Photo © Catherine Rubin Kermorgant. Lakshmi, 14 was dedicated by her aunt, against the will of her mother.

At 1pm on Saturday 21 November, we welcome Catherine Rubin Kermorgant (author of ‘Servants of the Goddess’), to a special event at the International Slavery Museum: ‘Telling the Story’

Catherine is one of three authors taking part in the event, all of whom have been inspired to write books about modern slavery in India.

Here we talk to Catherine about what first inspired her to put pen to paper, and about the impact that working with the devadasis of India has had on her own life. Read more…

Exploring artistic process and practice

23 October 2015 by Alison

Caroline Walker (artist) standing in front of 'Consulting the Oracle' painting

Caroline Walker with her painting ‘Consulting the Oracle’ (detail), 2013. © Caroline Walker. Private collection

We recently spoke to artist Caroline Walker whose paintings ‘Consulting the Oracle’ (2013) and ‘Illuminations’ (2012) are currently on display as part of REALITY: Modern and Contemporary British Painting. We were interested in finding out more about the artistic practice behind Caroline’s work, which we hope will inspire other artists. Read more…

Thrown out of his village: now bringing hope to thousands

15 October 2015 by Alison

Kavi

Kumar Swamy is South India Director for the Dalit Freedom Network and is responsible for oversight of a range of on the ground education, healthcare and economic programmes run for the benefit of Dalit communities in India. These trafficking prevention projects are helping to bring about real change – not only freeing Dalits from modern forms of slavery, but freeing them from the factors that make them so vulnerable to exploitation and abuse in the first place. Here Kumar tells us of the challenges he faced growing up as a young Dalit boy in India, and of the work going on to bring about meaningful and long-lasting change in the country he loves. Read more…

Welcome to Black History Month

1 October 2015 by Alison

legacy-gallery-visitor_3As we move into the month of October, Black History month in the UK, Mitty from the Education team tells us all about the events and fun, family friendly activities that are taking place at the museum. Read more…

Fashion victim?

17 September 2015 by Alison

Indian girls hands

Image courtesy of STOP THE TRAFFIK

Are the garments you’re wearing today free from human trafficking, or is a heartbreaking story woven through their fabric?

Carolyn Kitto, Co-Director STOP THE TRAFFIK Australia Coalition, highlights the challenges facing fashion consumers, retailers and manufacturers:

“About 16 young women had been waiting for us to arrive in a small and stiflingly hot room. They were in their late teens and early 20s. They were all eager to tell their stories of being in the Sumangali Scheme. This Scheme is a form of bonded labour and human trafficking which targets the poorest families of India. Read more…

Border Force family fun days

25 May 2015 by Alison

Sniffer dog at work

Seized! is a permanent gallery situated in the Merseyside Maritime Museum at the Albert Dock Liverpool. The gallery explores the mysterious world of smuggling and the way in which the Border Force protects society against harms caused by this illegal activity. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.