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Posts by Lucy

38 days to go until the Games begin!

19 June 2012 by Lucy

Our wonderful volunteer Jamie McFadden has been blogging again. This time, he’s on the trail of Liverpool’s footballing Olympian.


Red or blue? It was gold for Arthur Berry…

Born in 1888, Arthur Berry was destined to be one of Liverpool’s most successful footballers, but not necessarily at Anfield or Goodison Park! Arthur’s stage was at the 1908 and 1912 Olympics. The first Olympics that Arthur Berry competed in were, like the 2012 Games, held in London. Playing alongside some of his previous team mates, he was part of the Gold medal winning football team. Read more…

City Soldiers – The DePeyster Collection

13 June 2012 by Lucy

Introducing Jamie McFadden, who’s been helping us out in the Press Office this week, and researching a very interesting talk that’s coming up tomorrow at the Museum of Liverpool.


The King’s Regiment has been involved in conflicts and battles around the world since the 1700s. Over the years, members of the Regiment have collected ‘Trophies of War’ and the further back in time we go, the more extravagant these trophies become.

National Museums Liverpool has a long-term loan of collections from the King’s Regiment that are currently exhibited in the City Soldiers gallery at the Museum of Liverpool. Some of the items in the collection date back to conflicts hundreds of years ago between British and American forces in an attempt to protect British overseas colonies. Read more…

100 days to go until the Games begin!

18 April 2012 by Lucy

Today marks 100 days until the Olympics, and as the Games creep ever closer, we’re looking back at some of the medal winners who have come out of Merseyside since the first international Olympic Games held in the modern era.

The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, yielded a bronze medal winner from Liverpool in the form of Konstantinos Paspatis, who actually won his medal for Greece.

Held in the Panathinaiko Stadium, Athens was unanimously chosen as the host city, as Ancient Greece was the birthplace of the Olympic Games and therefore seemed most appropriate for the inaugural modern Games. Read more…

Titanic Playathon – can you play?

17 April 2012 by Lucy

Boy playing a violin

We are appealing for string quartets of all ages to play this Saturday and Sunday

Do you play an instrument? No matter how old or young, or how long you’ve been playing, we’d love you to get involved in our Titanic Playathon this weekend at the Museum of Liverpool.

This Saturday and Sunday, we’re hosting a poignant tribute to the brave Titanic Orchestra, who courageously played as the Titanic sank on 15 April 1912.

Local string quartets are invited to take part in the Titanic Playathon which is aimed at sustaining constant live music throughout opening hours at the Museum. Read more…

The reptiles that rocked REM

12 April 2012 by Lucy

As World Museum’sAge of the Dinosaur exhibition draws to a close on 15 April music fan Dickie Felton looks at one rock group’s prehistoric obsession.


Photograph of Dickie Felton and Michael Stipe

Dickie Felton pictured with REM’s Michael Stipe in Dublin September 2001

REM, one of the world’s first big alternative rock bands, had a craze for plastic dinosaurs. The figures began to appear mysteriously in the 1980s; invading amplifiers and stages around the globe.

When REM first formed honorary band members included a tiny T-Rex and a Triceratops. They even sat in on recording sessions for three decades until 2011 when the band decided to call it a day.
Plastic dinos would go on world tours and pop up on speakers and instruments. In the 1996 song “Wake-Up Bomb” singer Michael Stipe sang about practising his “T-Rex moves and make the scene.”  It wasn’t that Stipe was a secret palaeontologist. It was more to do with creature comforts than a deep rooted fascination. Read more…

Happy New Year!

5 April 2012 by Lucy

Matt Dunn, Fundraising and Membership Officer, writes about a very different type of New Year…


Happy New Year! There may not be any fireworks or Auld Lang Syne but here at National Museums Liverpool we’re celebrating the start of our membership year.

Over the next 12 months we’ve lined up a great programme of adult and family events where we’ll be opening the doors to our museums and galleries just to members.

Our adult events offer unrivalled opportunities to enjoy new exhibitions or talks from guest speakers outside public opening hours whilst family members explore our museums and take part in specially-arranged activities during our themed event evenings. Read more…

Captain Noel Chavasse VC & Bar, MC (1884 – 1917)

23 March 2012 by Lucy

Tomorrow, is our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool, and you may know that we have been blogging all week about WWI soldiers from the city. Today, we’re featuring Captain Noel Chavasse, who was the only soldier in WWI to receive the honour of the Victoria Cross twice.

Photograph of Captain Noel Chavasse

Captain Noel Chavasse won the Victoria Cross twice

The son of the Bishop of Liverpool, Noel was twice awarded the Victoria Cross (VC) and was the most highly decorated British serviceman in the First World War. Read more…

Captain Frank Watson

22 March 2012 by Lucy

Today, we’re looking at the story of Captain Frank Watson, in the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday.

Photograph of Frank Watson

Frank Watson originally signed up to the 17th Pals Battalion in Liverpool.

Lord Derby came up with the idea of bringing together men who worked and socialised in a fighting regiment to appeal to more men to ‘sign up’.

The response to the first adverts was so great, that Lord Derby was able to form two battalions, and by mid-October a second advertisement appealing for recruits meant that there were a total of four ‘Liverpool Pals’ battalions, and two reserve battalions. They were officially known as the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Service Battalions of the King’s Regiment, Liverpool. Read more…

The Turner Brothers

21 March 2012 by Lucy

This is our second blog post in a series leading up to our World War One Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool this Saturday, 24 March. Today, we look at the story of the Turner Brothers, William and Fred.

Soldiers from the Liverpool Scottish Battalion

William and Fred Turner signed up as Officers to the Liverpool Scottish Battalion. William can be seen here on the far right.

Lieutenants William and Fred Turner were born in Ullet Road, Liverpool, to parents Jessie and William. Both attended the local Greenbank School, and went on to become successful sportsmen in cricket, rugby and football at Sedbergh School, Yorkshire before following in their father’s footsteps and joining the printing firm Turner & Dunnett, of which their father was Senior Partner.
The boys were among the first to ‘sign up’ and both joined the Liverpool Scottish Battalion as officers. Read more…

David Jones – Victoria Cross Hero

20 March 2012 by Lucy

Image of David Jones, VC

David Jones was awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding bravery

In the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday, we’ll be sharing a few stories from our collection about soldiers who fought in World War I.

Today’s story is about David Jones, VC.

David Jones, from Smithdown Lane in Edge Hill, enlisted in 1915 and was soon promoted to Sergeant.

Read more…