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Continuing the Journey

23 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Clint Agard, who contributed to the project

Clint Agard – project contributor

Continuing the Journey at the International Slavery Museum gives an insight into experiences of racism in Merseyside. Leila Romaya from Stray Cat Media tell us more about the project and how it developed…

” ‘Racism is a cancer on this earth’ said one contributor to the project, poet and urban griot Levi Tafari. Continuing the Journey provides a powerful platform that acknowledges the racism that people of African and Caribbean heritage have experienced and continue to experience.

The project’s aim was to give contributors a voice to share their often painful and traumatic experiences of racism through film, photography and audio recordings, as well as offering a wider platform for learning, discussion and debate so that we can work together towards a more cohesive, respectful and accepting future in which illogical racial and cultural stereotypes have no place in our lives.  Read more…

Encounters – Broken Lives

7 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of a JoginiTo accompany our powerful new exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, we have a series of talks and events exploring the themes and issues in the display. The next talk on Saturday 11 July will highlight how some Dalit women and girls are forced into ritual sex slavery as Joginis and what is being done to combat this exploitation. Later on in the year on 21 November, author David Skivington will be talking about why modern slavery in India is central to his writing.

Here, David tells us more about what inspired him to use his second novel to raise awareness of the Jogini system: Read more…

Helping to mend broken lives

9 June 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Jeeva Kumar

Modern slavery is a global issue and the International Slavery Museum works closely with organisations who campaign against these human rights abuses. Our next exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, developed in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, will highlight the exploitation of India’s Dalit community. Jeeva Kumar, Director of Pratigya India, will be giving a talk at the museum during the opening weekend. Here Jeeva tells us more about her work to combat trafficking of girls and women in south India:

“Poised on the Uhuru peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro, I savoured the moment of triumph, having overcome many obstacles to scale the peak. I was one of the 48 women who climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro as part of our movement’s initiative to raise awareness and funds to fight human trafficking all over the world. Uhuru in Swahili means ‘Freedom’ and the climb was a symbolic representation of overcoming the struggles faced by the oppressed, enslaved, exploited and trafficked women and children, every day. Read more…

Students honour Alice Seeley Harris as an Unsung Hero

19 May 2015 by Lucy Johnson

A black and white photograph of Alice Seeley Harris sat on a chair on her 100th birthday

Alice Seeley Harris on her 100th birthday in 1970.

Alice Seeley Harris’ photographs of the Free State Congo in the 1900s revealed the horror of colonial violence and exploitation to the world. Our exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum highlights how these images were used to overthrow King Leopold II’s brutal regime. Over a century after Alice took these photographs, students in Kansas have been inspired by her story and have developed a wonderful project acknowledging her work. One of the students tells us more…

“My name is Avery Stratton. I am a senior at Washburn Rural High School in Topeka, Kansas, in the United States. A couple of my peers and I are currently working on an entry for the Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes Project competition in Fort Scott, Kansas, which is an effort to highlight individuals who have demonstrated immense courage and compassion in the past who may have not received the recognition they deserve

Alexis Balaun, one of our team members, discovered Alice Seeley Harris while watching a documentary on the Congo. Alice’s heart-wrenching photos were showcased, but not much was said about the person behind the camera. Intrigued by this brave woman, Alexis presented her to our group and we knew that Alice would make the perfect focus for our project.  Read more…

Crisis Art Competition

13 May 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Painting of poppies with red and blue backgroundI have always been a strong believer that art has an important role to play in society, so I am really lucky to work closely with the Walker Art Gallery and its inspiring collection of works. I recently got the opportunity to view some more inspiring art when I was asked to be involved in a competition run by run by the homeless charity CrisisRead more…

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

Open morning at the Royal School for the Blind

19 February 2015 by Lucy Johnson

A flyer with information about the opening morning, a portrait of Rushton and an illustration of the schoolUnsung: Liverpool’s Most Radical Son displays at the Museum of Liverpool and International Slavery Museum celebrate the campaign work of Edward Rushton, who co-founded the Royal School for the Blind in 1791. Teacher Nick Young has been blogging for us over the last few months, providing an insight into the fascinating history of the school and its work today. Here, Nick explains how the school is opening its doors for people to find out more…

“As part of the events to celebrate the life and work of Edward Rushton in this bicentennial anniversary of his death, the Royal School for the Blind, at Church Road North in Liverpool, is holding an open morning. Taking place on Saturday 7 March from 10am until midday, we invite you to come and see a part of his legacy to Liverpool. Read more…

Lusitania: Queen of the Seas!

16 February 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Front cover of music showing and illustration of LusitainaLusitania: life, loss, legacy opens at the Merseyside Maritime Museum on 27 March. This new exhibition will tell the story of the Liverpool passenger liner RMS Lusitania and her tragic sinking during the First World War.

The sheet music for a piano waltz titled ‘Lusitania: Queens of the Seas’ is in the Museum’s archive collection. The front cover of the sheet music is signed and dated by the composer George Manners Herd on 1 January 1908, just four months after the passenger liner’s maiden voyage. Read more…

Crisis art group mural

18 December 2014 by Lucy Johnson

Crisis art group in front of their muralThroughout 2014, an art group run by the charity Crisis have visited exhibitions across our museums and galleries. Inspired by what they have seen, the group members have spent the last 12 weeks working together in their workshop on a mural which celebrates the city of Liverpool. I attended the unveiling of the fantastic artwork and got the chance to see other paintings the group have produced. There were some wonderful creations!

Their favourite exhibitions this year were Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences and the John Moores Painting Prize at the Walker Art Gallery; both provided the group with a wealth of discussion, debate and ideas for their own work. The group spoke very passionately about their experiences of visiting our venues and it was very rewarding to see how our exhibitions can inform, challenge and inspire people.

Detail of the mural showing a lambanana, the radio city tower the ferry and Ken Dodd.A big thank you to Crisis art group and we hope to see you in 2015!

 

Royal School for the Blind, today

17 December 2014 by Lucy Johnson

A photograph of a young girl who attends the Royal School for the BlindAn admissions register from 1791 which lists the first pupils to attend Liverpool’s Royal School for the Blind is currently on display at the Museum of Liverpool. It is part of Unsung, a display which celebrates the life of Edward Rushton, a human rights activist who started the campaign to set up the school. Teacher Nick Young gives us an insight into the ongoing work of the school today:

Nick Young: “More than two centuries of educating the visually impaired have placed the Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool as one of the leading schools of its kind. The school was founded in 1791 by Edward Rushton and was the first such school in Britain, second only to Paris in the world. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.