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Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

Open morning at the Royal School for the Blind

19 February 2015 by Lucy Johnson

A flyer with information about the opening morning, a portrait of Rushton and an illustration of the schoolUnsung: Liverpool’s Most Radical Son displays at the Museum of Liverpool and International Slavery Museum celebrate the campaign work of Edward Rushton, who co-founded the Royal School for the Blind in 1791. Teacher Nick Young has been blogging for us over the last few months, providing an insight into the fascinating history of the school and its work today. Here, Nick explains how the school is opening its doors for people to find out more…

“As part of the events to celebrate the life and work of Edward Rushton in this bicentennial anniversary of his death, the Royal School for the Blind, at Church Road North in Liverpool, is holding an open morning. Taking place on Saturday 7 March from 10am until midday, we invite you to come and see a part of his legacy to Liverpool. Read more…

Lusitania: Queen of the Seas!

16 February 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Front cover of music showing and illustration of LusitainaLusitania: life, loss, legacy opens at the Merseyside Maritime Museum on 27 March. This new exhibition will tell the story of the Liverpool passenger liner RMS Lusitania and her tragic sinking during the First World War.

The sheet music for a piano waltz titled ‘Lusitania: Queens of the Seas’ is in the Museum’s archive collection. The front cover of the sheet music is signed and dated by the composer George Manners Herd on 1 January 1908, just four months after the passenger liner’s maiden voyage. Read more…

Crisis art group mural

18 December 2014 by Lucy Johnson

Crisis art group in front of their muralThroughout 2014, an art group run by the charity Crisis have visited exhibitions across our museums and galleries. Inspired by what they have seen, the group members have spent the last 12 weeks working together in their workshop on a mural which celebrates the city of Liverpool. I attended the unveiling of the fantastic artwork and got the chance to see other paintings the group have produced. There were some wonderful creations!

Their favourite exhibitions this year were Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences and the John Moores Painting Prize at the Walker Art Gallery; both provided the group with a wealth of discussion, debate and ideas for their own work. The group spoke very passionately about their experiences of visiting our venues and it was very rewarding to see how our exhibitions can inform, challenge and inspire people.

Detail of the mural showing a lambanana, the radio city tower the ferry and Ken Dodd.A big thank you to Crisis art group and we hope to see you in 2015!

 

Royal School for the Blind, today

17 December 2014 by Lucy Johnson

A photograph of a young girl who attends the Royal School for the BlindAn admissions register from 1791 which lists the first pupils to attend Liverpool’s Royal School for the Blind is currently on display at the Museum of Liverpool. It is part of Unsung, a display which celebrates the life of Edward Rushton, a human rights activist who started the campaign to set up the school. Teacher Nick Young gives us an insight into the ongoing work of the school today:

Nick Young: “More than two centuries of educating the visually impaired have placed the Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool as one of the leading schools of its kind. The school was founded in 1791 by Edward Rushton and was the first such school in Britain, second only to Paris in the world. Read more…

“An inspiration to the people of Liverpool and beyond”

19 November 2014 by Lucy Johnson

Framed painting of Edward RushtonNick Young, teacher from the Royal School for the Blind, tells us about how Edward Rushton, whose story is currently being told in Unsung displays and events across the city as part of DadaFest International 2014, continues to be an inspiration to the school:

“Every family has its treasures and keepsakes that remind them of where they have come from and possibly point a way to the future. The legacy of Edward Rushton is no exception. Our school is rightly proud to have Rushton amongst its founders. His philanthropy, philosophy and integrity in the face of opposition, particularly in relation to the slave trade, remain an inspiration to the people of Liverpool and beyond. Read more…

Edward Rushton’s legacy

13 November 2014 by Lucy Johnson

An illustration of the school at its first site on Commutation RowThe work of human rights activist Edward Rushton (1756 – 1814) is celebrated in new displays at the International Slavery Museum, the Museum of Liverpool and the Victoria Gallery and Museum.

One of Rushton’s most significant achievements was setting up Liverpool’s Royal School for Blind. Nick Young, a current teacher at the school, will be blogging for us over the next few months. Here Nick tells us more about the history of the school: Read more…

New exhibition celebrating Black British dancers

6 September 2013 by Lucy Johnson

A dancer from the Jiving Lindy Hoppers performing at the Merseyside Maritime Museum

This week we have been taking down Oil Boom, Delta burns: photographs by George Osodi at the International Slavery Museum. It’s always sad to see a display close, but also a chance to put up an exciting, new exhibition! Read more…

Making a Fashion Statement!

8 August 2012 by Lucy Johnson

Two museum staff in the White Gold exhibition and wearing white tshirts with the winning slogan

Stephen Carl-Lokko and Angela Samata wearing the winning tshirts

Visitors to White Gold: the true cost of cotton in the Campaign Zone at the International Slavery Museum have been coming up with t-shirt slogans related to the issues in the exhibition. Developed in partnership with the Environmental Justice Foundation, White Gold draws attention to the exploitation of workers in the cotton industry in Uzbekistan.

The fashion designer Katharine Hamnett went through over 300 entries to select the winner of the t-shirt competion. A big congratulations to Katie Fernandez from Woolton for her winning slogan: ‘Thousands of Childhood’s Lost…and all I got was this lousy tshirt’. The slogan has been printed onto 100% organic cotton t-shirts and is available to purchase from EJF’s online shop. Read more…

Capturing Liverpool Life

30 July 2012 by Lucy Johnson

Museum staff stood with the paintings on display at Liverpool Cathedral

 

Two paintings from the Walker Art Gallery’s collections have gone on display at Liverpool Cathedral. ‘St John’s Market, Liverpool – Saturday Morning’ and ‘Bold Street from Waterloo Place’ by Charles Trevor Prescott give an insight into everyday life in Liverpool at the end of the 19th century. The lively scene of Bold Street is instantly recognisable and shows the transport and fashion of the time. The bustling stalls in St John’s depict a thriving market. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.