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Posts by Lynn

Jars for the afterlife

12 September 2016 by Lynn

Canopic jarsThe first in a series of blogs from Marion Servat-Fredericq, Assistant Curator of Antiquities, reveals aspects of the fascinating culture of Ancient Egypt through some objects from our collection.

“We have put some of the most popular objects from our Egyptian collection on display online while the Ancient Egypt gallery is closed for extensive refurbishment.  This beautiful set of Egyptian canopic jars, also on display in the atrium, give us insight into Egyptian beliefs about the afterlife. Read more…

Getting dressed in the 18th century

3 August 2016 by Lynn

Mrs Paine and her Daughters (1975), Sir Joshua Reynolds (c) National Museums Liverpool

Mrs Paine and her Daughters (1975), Sir Joshua Reynolds (c) National Museums Liverpool

Costume curator Pauline Rushton explores what it was like for women to get dressed in the 18th century.

“Getting ourselves dressed in the morning is one of the everyday things we all take for granted, along with brushing our hair and our teeth. But what would it feel like to have someone else dress you every day? In the 18th century, provided you had enough money and could afford to pay servants, that would be the norm, especially if you were a woman. In any case, clothes could be so complicated that you wouldn’t be able to get into them easily without someone else’s assistance. Ideas about privacy and intimacy were different then too – it was normal to be touched by a servant if they were helping you wash or dress.

Read more…

Philanthropy, patrons and the Pre-Raphaelites

20 April 2016 by Lynn

pre-raphs-event

Emma Gilbertson shares her discoveries on the history of patronage that is fundamental to our collections, museums and galleries.

“One of the things I’ve learned during my time at National Museums Liverpool is that it is full of stories about collectors, benefactors and patrons. They have shaped both the buildings we are housed in, and our collections which are some of the best in the world.

If you have visited our ‘Pre-Raphaelites: Beauty and Rebellion’ exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery, you may have come across the Liverpool-based merchant John Miller, a significant patron of the movement. An avid collector, Miller reputedly bought so much art that he didn’t have enough hanging space for it all. He supported many Pre-Raphaelite artists including Ford Madox Brown and John Everett Millais. Read more…

Legacies with a lasting impact

8 March 2016 by Lynn

Kathryn in the Walker Art Gallery

This March is Free Wills Month which urges people to make or update their wills. Emma Gilbertson, our Fundraising and Events Officer explores the impact of legacies at National Museums Liverpool.

“Have you made a will? Perhaps like many of us, you have thought about it, but never seem to actually get around to doing it.

Part of my role  involves administering legacies left to National Museums Liverpool. Legacies left to National Museums Liverpool can have a lasting impact, and the generosity of people never fails to surprise me. Read more…

The husband and wife who excavated pottery from tombs in Cyprus

21 December 2015 by Lynn

Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Antiquities, explores how distinctive red-polished pottery, excavated from tombs in Cyprus in the 1930s, came to be in our collections here in Liverpool.

Bowl from Vounous

A red-polished bowl from our own Vounous pottery collection

“Vounous is in Bellapaise in northern Cyprus and it is a site known for the famous, Early to Middle Bronze Age Cypriot period. Read more…

Introducing our collection of snakes, lizards and frogs

17 November 2015 by Lynn

Tony looking at snakes in a jarTony Parker, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology, reveals the weird and wonderful collection of reptiles and amphibians… in jars!

“One of the things I find compelling about our collection of reptiles and amphibians is that they are stored in glass jars with strange-looking fluids, as if they are museum specimens straight out of the Victorian era. In fact, most of the specimens are actually from a much later period, including significant additions to the collection in the 1950s and 60s. Read more…

The temple boys of ancient Cyprus

29 October 2015 by Lynn

Head of a temple boyCurator of Classical Antiquities, Chrissy Partheni tells us of her work on this fascinating sculptural collection from ancient Cyprus.

“Over the last 12 months I have been working on digital records of our antiquities collection of ancient Cyprus limestone pieces.

My first encounter with this collection was seeing lots of boxes in our store, filled with sculptural pieces, mainly heads, all made in limestone, a chalky but light material.  The collection was donated to us in 1872 by Captain Fothergill. We have 125 limestone pieces in total with 11 “Temple boy” statuettes being particularly interesting.   Read more…

Designing our online collections

3 September 2015 by Lynn

Our new design.

Our new design.

Tibetan robes, watercolours, Egyptian mummies and frogs – what do they have in common? They’re all part of our vast and varied collections!

We’ve been looking at how we can present the items from our collections, better online. Because we have such diverse collections, it’s really difficult to find a single way to do this. As well as decorative and fine art collections, we have collections of insects, birds, plants, social history, medals, ships, models, maritime archives and items associated with slavery. And that’s just some of them! Read more…

Plant models collection now online

25 June 2015 by Lynn

Here, Curator of Botany, Donna Young reveals a fascinating part of our botanical collection, Brendel’s anatomical plant models and how they were used as teaching aides.

A dismantled oat model

“Down in the basement of World Museum there is a room with cabinets lining the walls. Inside these cabinets are an amazing collection of large and very colourful plant models. You may have seen some of them displayed in our atrium or in our Clore Natural History Centre.  Read more…

Free online course about museums

9 March 2015 by Lynn

Hayley, with cameraHayley Evans, from the University of Leicester tells us about her role as video producer for MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), a free online course in Museum Studies- a collaboration between  National Museums Liverpool and The School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester.


Being a filmmaker at the University of Leicester gives me the opportunity to work on various projects Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.