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Making three new guns for Oceanic 2

14 April 2014 by Sam

detail of guns on the deck of a ship model

Oceanic 2, showing an original gun (left) and a new one (right)

Here’s the latest update from ship and historic models conservator  David Parsons, in a blog series about conserving the model of Oceanic 2:

“The last of the major pieces of work that I have done for the conservation of the builder’s model of Oceanic 2 was the making of three replacement guns, similar to Bofors guns, or 12 pounder Quick Firing guns.

Originally the model had eight guns but three of these were missing. Read more…

Guardians of the dawn: the Liverpool Pilots

27 March 2014 by Sam

man on the deck of a ship on the river Mersey, with the Liverpool waterfront in the background

John Curry

Ben Whittaker, curator of port history at Merseyside Maritime Museum, has news of a special free talk next week:

“Who ensures the safe passage of shipping into and out of the Port of Liverpool? The Liverpool Pilots!

The sea approaches to Liverpool have always been difficult waters to navigate,  so the Liverpool Pilot Service was established in 1766 to safely guide ships into the port. For almost 30 years our own ship the Edmund Gardner – the largest object in our collections – provided a base for the service in the Irish Sea. Read more…

5 years on twitter – a look back

25 March 2014 by Sam

screen showing the message 'Am I on your tweetwall? How exciting is this?'

The tweetwall at the opening of the Museum of Liverpool

As it’s #MuseumWeek on twitter it felt like an appropriate time to reflect on our oldest and most popular twitter account.

The Museum of Liverpool’s twitter account was set up on 23 February 2009, just over 5 years ago. It was our first venue to start tweeting, in fact not many other museums were even on twitter at the time. As you can see from this photo taken the previous week, the museum looked very different back then as it was still under construction. Read more…

Microfade testing of light sensitive collections

19 March 2014 by Sam

Man with technical equipment and a decorative table

Visiting conservation scientist, Bruce Ford, testing the light fastness of a painted table from the Lady Lever Art Gallery

Siobhan Watts, Head of Conservation Science at the Conservation Centre, has news about some of the vital behind-the-scenes work that she does to protect our collections:

“What do a watercolour by Burne-Jones, regimental colours, Native American quillwork moccasins, and silk furniture covers have in common? Answer – they are all sensitive to light, and will fade to a greater or lesser degree when they are on display. Read more…

Inspiring women photographers

6 March 2014 by Sam

Rebecca Seeley Harris standing in front of a photo of her great grandmother in the Congo

Rebecca Seeley Harris said she felt very proud of her pioneering great grandmother Alice when she visited the Brutal Exposure exhibition

Marilyn Monroe famously claimed “Give a girl the right shoes, and she can conquer the world”. However, two exhibitions that have opened recently on Liverpool’s waterfront show that if you give a girl a camera then she can change the world.

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum features photographs taken by Alice Seeley Harris when she and her husband were working as missionaries in the Congo Free State in the early 1900s. They became active human rights campaigners after witnessing first hand the atrocities carried out in the name of King Leopold II. Read more…

Ford Escort with top gear from the 1970s

3 February 2014 by Sam

yellow-ford-escort-atrium

Sharon Brown, curator of land transport and industry at the Museum of Liverpool, has news of a brand new arrival that you may have spotted in the window today:

Question: What’s yellow and shiny and new to the Museum of Liverpool?

Answer: A 1975 Ford Escort 1100L, 1975 Read more…

To Bath and beyond

29 January 2014 by Sam

paintings on display in an exhibition

The two paintings from the Walker Art Gallery, ‘Death and the old man’ on the left and ‘The Girandola’ in the centre of the photo.

National Museums Liverpool handling and transport technician Danny John writes about his recent courier trip:

“The Holburne Museum in Bath is currently hosting the exhibition Joseph Wright of Derby: Bath and Beyond. Two paintings from the Walker Art Gallery’s collection ‘The Girandola’ and ‘Death and the old man’ are on loan to the exhibition, so I travelled to Bath with them as the courier. Read more…

Turkey leftovers

26 December 2013 by Sam

model ship with wooden masts and string rigging rising from a bone hull

Turkey breast bone model. Accession number 1982.966

On the day that many of us will be raiding the fridge for the remains of Christmas dinner, Chris Moseley, head of ship and historic models conservation at National Museums Liverpool, has a very creative suggestion for what to do with some of it:

“At Christmas we all wonder what to do with the turkey leftovers – turkey sandwiches, curried turkey or turkey ship model? Read more…

Christmas e-cards

18 December 2013 by Sam

illustration of monkeys and dogs at a party

As I’m sure you’re aware if you’ve been counting down the days on our lovely advent calendar, time is passing and Christmas is only a week away. It’s always the same, each year I say that next year I’m going to be organised, start my Christmas shopping in June and then enjoy a nice relaxed December. Hmm… Maybe 2014 could be the year that actually happens.

Today is the last day to send your cards by second class post in the UK, if you splash out on first class stamps then you’ve got until Friday. If these deadlines seem like impossible dreams to you the don’t worry, there is an alternative. Read more…

Model locomotive joins the real Lion on display

12 December 2013 by Sam

man next to train model in museum display

David Cook with his father Bert’s model of Lion locomotive

Sharon Brown, Curator of Land Transport and Industry at the Museum of Liverpool, has news of a new addition to the displays:

Lion locomotive is one of our most important objects, and certainly one of the most popular in our collections. Built in 1838 to run on the recently opened Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Lion was taken out of service in 1857 but has a fascinating history and is an important survivor from the early railway age. Read more…

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.