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Help bring the Mauretania home to Liverpool

27 April 2015 by Rebecca

Mauretania shipLiverpool writer George Garrett worked in the boiler rooms of Mauretania and called the ship “a big scouse boat”. Mauretania and her sister ship Lusitania, were the true ‘Monarchs of the Sea’ and were later affectionately known in Liverpool as ‘Maury’ and ‘Lucy’.

Mauretania was built by Swan Hunter of Newcastle for the Cunard Line and was one of their most successful liners. Cunard and its ships were a central part of Liverpool’s maritime story and the firm was based in the city. Cunard’s 1916 headquarters are one of the most recognisable buildings on the city’s waterfront and one of the iconic three graces. Read more…

Remembering the role of Mersey ferries in the First World War

23 April 2015 by Sam

ferry decorated with colourful geometric patterns

The dazzled Mersey ferry Snowdrop

On Sunday Ben Whittaker, curator of maritime history and technology at Merseyside Maritime Museum, is taking part in events to mark the role that the Mersey Ferries played in the First World War, as he explains

“Today, Thursday 23 April, is St George’s Day, and on this day 98 years ago the Mersey ferries Iris and Daffodil took part in the daring First World War raid on Zeebrugge Harbour.  Read more…

Art inspires art at the Walker Art Gallery

22 April 2015 by Felicity

Image of David's painting of the Roman Emperor Lucius Verus

David’s painting of the Roman Emperor Lucius Verus

In this blog post, Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Classical Antiquities, tells us how National Museums Liverpool’s sculpture collection inspired art student David Brown:

“Museum curators are in a constant dialogue with people and we are always keen to explore how collections can inspire people with different skills.

Recently I was approached by David Brown, a Level 3 City and Guilds Art and Design student who wanted to know more about a sculptural bust that he thought he saw in World Museum. The bust is actually on show in the Sculpture Gallery at the Walker Art Gallery and it one of the pieces from the collection of Henry Blundell. Read more…

Cleaning and lining the Falaba painting

22 April 2015 by David Crombie

detail of a ship painting, showing a small dark dirty area of the sky

The Falaba painting during the final stages of cleaning in the sky with nearly all of the dirt layers removed

This is the third blog in a series following the conservation of the huge painting of the Falaba, which is now on display in the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss legacy. In the last post I described the structural treatment of the painting, in order to reattach the loose paint.

Once the structural treatment was complete, the painting was turned over and cleaning could begin once the facing tissue was removed. Cleaning proved quite difficult, as the thick grime layers had previously been covered by the wax facing. Read more…

Spotted! That’s me in the photo – 30 years on

20 April 2015 by Kay

two women in front of a huge photo

Vivian with her daughter in front of the photograph of her (right)

Vivian Walcott was recently very surprised to see herself as a 10 year old in the L8 Unseen exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool – especially as she doesn’t remember the event or the photograph being taken!

The picture, of a street party for the L8 Mandela Freedom Festival in 1988, shows Vivian with her friend, Tito Cooper.

She lived in Magdela Street at the time – where her mum, a well-known member of the community still lives, and fondly remembers the tight knit L8 community growing up. Read more…

Conserving Egyptian animal mummies

17 April 2015 by Tracey

several small animal-shaped mummies on a table

A recent arrival here in the organics conservation studio is this strange little collection of Egyptian animal mummies from World Museum.

Here we have pear-shaped folded-up birds, cats with painted faces, a fish, a very small dog, crocodiles and something very neat in the shape of a miniature human mummy. Read more…

Structural treatment of the ‘Falaba’ painting

16 April 2015 by David Crombie

large painting lying flat on a table with a protective cover

To stretch it, the protected painting was placed face-up within a wooden loom frame on the multi-purpose lining table before wetted brown paper strips were attached around all four sides. As these were drying, the table was set to provide moisture underneath the canvas to relax it slightly during the stretching process.

Curator Ellie Moffat recently blogged about the centenary of the sinking of the ‘Falaba’ during the First World War. In her blog post she mentioned the large painting of Falaba which has just gone on display in the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss, legacy.

Preparing the painting for display was quite a large job, not just because of its size, but also because it was not in a very good condition after suffering water damage many years ago.  Read more…

Fresh Perspectives at the Lady Lever Art Gallery

15 April 2015 by Ann

nml-fresh-perspectives-2015-6901 blog

Angelica Vanasse, Education Project Assistant for the Lady Lever Art Gallery has been working with local schools and their art departments on a very special exhibition, now in the final week of the ‘Fresh Perspectives: Art from Wirral Schools’ she tells you why you need to make time to see the work of our young local artists.  Read more…

Lord Mayor is a House of Memories ‘Buddy’

15 April 2015 by Lucy

Image of Carol Rogers and Lord Mayor

(l-r) Carol Rogers, Executive Director of Education and Visitors at National Museums, and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Councillor Erica Kemp

Ahead of our new ‘Buddy’ programme, which begins at the Museum of Liverpool next week, The Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Councillor Erica Kemp, has shared with us her personal experiences of dementia, and how House of Memories can help:

“One of the charities I have chosen to support during my year as Lord Mayor is the Alzheimer’s Society. So, when I became Lord Mayor I took myself along to the Museum of Liverpool to meet Carol Rogers and learn more about the House of Memories dementia awareness programme. It was an amazing visit and I learned so much about what the Museum is doing to not only support those who have had a diagnosis of dementia but those who support them.

Read more…

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.