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5 years on twitter – a look back

25 March 2014 by Sam

screen showing the message 'Am I on your tweetwall? How exciting is this?'

The tweetwall at the opening of the Museum of Liverpool

As it’s #MuseumWeek on twitter it felt like an appropriate time to reflect on our oldest and most popular twitter account.

The Museum of Liverpool’s twitter account was set up on 23 February 2009, just over 5 years ago. It was our first venue to start tweeting, in fact not many other museums were even on twitter at the time. As you can see from this photo taken the previous week, the museum looked very different back then as it was still under construction. Read more…

100 years of the Lady Lever!

24 March 2014 by Laura

Men on construction site

The laying of the Lady Lever Art Gallery’s foundation stone 25 March 1922. Image © Leverhulme Family Archive

The 25th March marks an exciting anniversary for us – 100 years since King George V laid the gallery’s foundation stone! Read more…

An exclusive look at the Turner exhibition

24 March 2014 by Lisa

Members at the Turner exhibition event.Here’s Sarah Houghton from our membership team to tell us about a recent special event for the ‘Turner: travels, light and landscape’ exhibition at the Lady Lever Art Gallery:

I always enjoy all the buzz around a new exhibition opening.  It’s a chance to invite our National Museums Liverpool members along, so they can enjoy an exclusive look at the new exhibition and see for themselves how their money is being used. World-class exhibitions being just one important area. I was pleased to meet some of our members last week at a special evening event to coincide with the opening of the new Turner exhibition. Read more…

A day in the life of the Aquarium

24 March 2014 by Alyster

Alyster, one of our aquarists, getting ready to feed the sharks.

Alyster getting ready to feed the sharks.

Hello, I’m Alyster, an aquarist at World Museum. Today I’m going to tell you a bit about a ‘typical’ day working in the Aquarium – although each day can be very different from the last! I’m not the only aquarist who works at the museum. Myself and Ben (who has a starring role in the video below) take care of the majority of the husbandry, with help from our boss Paul, who isn’t afraid to get his hands dirty and is happy to relay his 15+ years of experience as an aquarist.  Read more…

A short history of violence

19 March 2014 by Richard

Copy of IMG_2199

Dr Richard Benjamin, Head of the International Slavery Museum looks at the different ways museums have told the story of violence. Read more…

Microfade testing of light sensitive collections

19 March 2014 by Sam

Man with technical equipment and a decorative table

Visiting conservation scientist, Bruce Ford, testing the light fastness of a painted table from the Lady Lever Art Gallery

Siobhan Watts, Head of Conservation Science at the Conservation Centre, has news about some of the vital behind-the-scenes work that she does to protect our collections:

“What do a watercolour by Burne-Jones, regimental colours, Native American quillwork moccasins, and silk furniture covers have in common? Answer – they are all sensitive to light, and will fade to a greater or lesser degree when they are on display. Read more…

Meet our clownfish (aka Nemo!)

18 March 2014 by Alyster

'Clownfish' (or Nemo!)

‘Amphiprion percula’, commonly known as a ‘Clownfish’ (or Nemo!) Image courtesy of Haplochromis via Wikimedia commons.

Hi, I’m Alyster and I’m an aquarist at the Aquarium at World Museum. Over the next few months I’m going to introduce you to some of the fish in our Aquarium. I’ll be picking out the characters from the film ‘Finding Nemo’ and telling you more about the real fish behind the animation!

I’m going to start with the characters Nemo, Marlin and Coral, who are all clownfish.

It’s safe to say our clownfish are one of the most popular fish in our aquarium, and often draw the most attention. Children and adults a like will point with glee and exclaim “NEMO!” It’s no surprise given the massive success of the film and the iconic look the clownfish has. Read more…

Beside the seaside in Big Art

17 March 2014 by Angelica

Our cheeky herring gull and common cockles

Image by Robert Flynn

If this chilly weather has you dreaming of the summertime then the new display in Big Art for Little Artists at the Walker Art Gallery might warm you up! Inspired by local artist George Wallace Jardine’s painting ‘Full Fathom Five’ that was already on display, we gathered an inspiring mix of seaside objects from National Museums Liverpool’s collections that you might find on our local sea shores – from shells to seaweed and everything in between. Read more…

What it means to be Congolese – by Petronelle Moanda

13 March 2014 by Felicity

Petronelle stands next to her quote, displayed in the Brutal Exposure: the Congo exhibition

Petronelle standing next to her quote, displayed in the Brutal Exposure: the Congo exhibition

When we asked Petronelle Moanda, Operations Manager at the Congolese Association of Merseyside, if she’d like to send us a quote to be displayed in our Brutal Exposure: the Congo exhibition, we were moved by her incredibly honest and insightful account of what it means to her to be Congolese.

Petronelle will be a panel member at a free discussion, ‘The Congo: now and then’ held at the International Slavery Museum on Saturday at 2pm. She shares her account with us here: Read more…

International Women’s Day – Margaret Beavan, Liverpool’s First Woman Lord Mayor

7 March 2014 by Kay

MMM-1998-115-(2)

8 March is International Women’s Day and to help celebrate, we are highlighting objects in the Museum of Liverpool’s collections which help to tell the story of some amazing Liverpool women.

The first is this painting of Margaret Beavan – Liverpool’s First Woman Lord Mayor and Children’s Champion. It was painted by John Archibald Alexander Berrie, and shows Margaret at a dinner at the Lyceum Club, Bold Street, 19 December 1927, held in her honour. A footman can be seen in the background and Liverpool worthies and their wives sit either side of her. Significantly, this was the first occasion on which ladies were entertained within the gentleman’s club. Read more…