Our venues


Nurse Edith Cavell

8 October 2015 by Sam

memorial with statue of nurse and inscription

Memorial statue to Nurse Edith Cavell in London’s Trafalgar Square © Lee Karen Stow

Photographer Lee Karen Stow tells the story of one of the women featured in her exhibition Poppies: Women and War at the Museum of Liverpool:

“The exhibition Poppies: Women and War honours one of the bravest women in the history of the First World War who was executed one hundred years ago this coming October 12.

Edith Louisa Cavell was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without discrimination and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium. She was executed by German Army firing squad at dawn on October 12, 1915 aged 50.  Read more…

Glitz and glamour at the Lady Lever

8 October 2015 by Lisa

1930s sequinned dress.

Sequinned evening dress that belonged to Mrs Jane Moreton, the daughter of the Chief Officer on the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde.

Are you a fan of classic Hollywood movies from the 1930s? If so, you’ll love ‘Putting on the Glitz’, the new exhibition at the Lady Lever Art Gallery. There will be 20 outfits on display that wouldn’t look out of place in a film starring Bette Davis or Joan Crawford. Here’s Pauline Rushton, Curator of Costume and Textiles, to tell us about her favourite gown from the exhibition:  Read more…

The Lady Lever’s star objects: slavery medallion

7 October 2015 by Lisa

medallion-blogWhile the Lady Lever Art Gallery’s South End galleries are closed for redevelopment, we have chosen a selection of ‘star objects’ from these galleries that you can now see online. Here is our Senior Curator of Art Galleries, Alyson Pollard, to tell us about one of her favourites:  Read more…

Did you know Black boxers were banned from becoming British Champions until the 1940’s?

7 October 2015 by Sarah

Kid Tanner photoLiverpool journalist and author, Gary Shaw, writes for us ahead of his free talk at the International Slavery Museum on 10 October for Black History Month, on the rise and role of the colour bar in British boxing:

“Not a well-known aspect of sports history by academic, let alone popular historians, the rise and role of the colour bar in British boxing is a sorry tale of establishment resentment, colonial self-glorification and bureaucratic stubbornness that prevented a host of domestic fighters from competing for their own national titles as a professional due simply and sadly to the colour of their skin.

“Introduced almost in a fit of transatlantic pique by the semi-aristocratic owners and members of the National Sporting Club that ran British boxing at the time, the ban, informal at first but effective nevertheless, ran from 1911 until 1947, when pressure from papers, public and even Parliament forced the British Boxing Board of Control to repeal a clause they had embraced unquestionably on their formation as the governing body of the sport in 1929.

“For almost four decades, Britain was aligned with South Africa as the only countries in the world that prohibited black fighters from becoming national champions in their own country. The ban continued throughout the First and Second World Wars – the self-evident and tragic contradiction of the latter being one of the main reasons why calls for it to be repealed became so vociferous from 1944 onwards.

“My presentation touches on all these aspects, showing how wider social, economic and political arguments were used to highlight both the reasoning behind the ban’s introduction, and the rationale for its eventual abolition. In so doing, I will showcase a number of key individuals who, up until now, have rarely been referred to by historians of Black culture in Britain as well as the wider, and ever expanding, sports historian network”.

Find out more about Black History Month and our programme of free events throughout October.

Gwen Hardie: skin, light and paint

6 October 2015 by Lisa

Two 'skin portraits' in the REALITY exhibition.

Two ‘skin portraits’ in the REALITY exhibition.

We recently interviewed artist Gwen Hardie, whose ‘skin portraits’ are featured in the ‘REALITY’ exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery:  Read more…

1856 time capsule – connecting the Abbott family across the generations

2 October 2015 by Kay

photo of 3 women

Sisters Caryl Woof, Susan Towler and Anne Lurcott (Sarah’s mother). Their mother, Dorothy, was Florence’s daughter.

Back in June we put a special time capsule on display which gave us a fascinating glimpse of Liverpool life in 1856. Originally laid on 9 December, 1856 in the foundation stone of the workshop, warehouse and showroom of Abbott’s Cabinet Makers, it was rediscovered by builder John Connell during renovation work at the ‘Scandinavian Hotel’, on the corner of Nelson Street earlier this year.

Sarah Light, from West Sussex, heard about the display and got in touch to tell us that she is a descendant of the Abbot family and was very interested to see that the time capsule had been laid by her great great great grandfather, Samuel Abbott! Read more…

Welcome to Black History Month

1 October 2015 by Alison

legacy-gallery-visitor_3As we move into the month of October, Black History month in the UK, Mitty from the Education team tells us all about the events and fun, family friendly activities that are taking place at the museum. Read more…

New immigration display for Seized!

1 October 2015 by Andrew

Visitors meet a Border Force Officer at passport control

Visitors meet a Border Force Officer at passenger control

Seized! The Border and Customs Uncovered is the UK Border Force national museum. Located in Merseyside Maritime Museum’s basement, this week we unveil a new display looking at the work of Border Force Officers who work on passenger control. Read more…

Pride and Prejudice – but not what you think!

30 September 2015 by Matt

programme cover with illustration of the theatre

Royal Court Theatre Programme, 1951

A lot of my colleagues saw the title of the Pride and Prejudice project and thought we were doing an exhibition on Jane Austen, or at the very least Georgian life.  Luckily for me, they were wrong.  Instead what we have started work on is an amazingly interesting but admittedly challenging task.  We are undertaking a unique two year project, funded by the Esmee Fairbairn Collections Fund, to identify, research and better present objects and stories relating to Liverpool’s Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) communities held within our collections. Easy? Think again… Read more…

Alive and breeding!

29 September 2015 by Paula

Adult Rainbow Beetle

An adult Snowdon Leaf Beetle

Phase one of the Snowdon Leaf Beetle survey is now complete and, after many hours searching, the team were finally rewarded with an adult Snowdon Leaf Beetle – confirming it is still alive and breeding in the UK!

The Snowdon Leaf Beetle Chrysolina cerealis is probably the rarest of the 291 British species in this group of beetles, which feed on the leaves and seeds of plants. It is also one of only two beetles protected by law in the UK and a permit is needed to even search for it. Read more…

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.