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Posts tagged with 'access for all'

Show Me the Walker

6 May 2011 by stepheng

Two male and one female competition judges

The three judges take a break.

 

I’m looking forward to BBC 2 screening Show Me the Monet from this Monday after organising and supervising the marathon filming sessions over a January weekend.

 

A film crew filled three of our galleries at the rear of the Walker Art Gallery to film this competition show being screened at 5.15 pm every weekday night from Monday 9 May to Friday 20 May.

 

In a nutshell it involves artists being grilled about their artworks by three critics – David Lee, Charlotte Mullins and Roy Bolton (pictured left to right). The aim is to be included in an exclusive exhibition at the Royal College of Art, next to London’s Albert Hall. Read more…

Holding History

28 February 2011 by Lucy

The Museum of Liverpool education team is currently trying to track down a number of objects they can use as handling resources for learning sessions when the new museum opens.

Visitors touching a historical object

If you think you could help us track down one of the objects we require for handling sessions like this one, please let us know

Being able to touch and feel an object is a great way of bringing history to life for visitors, and if you think you can help provide us with any of the objects listed below, then please get in touch.

The list of objects required is as follows:
• Liverpool-made toys
• Victorian metal bucket and spade set
• Vintage Union Jack flag
• Opera glasses
• Top hat
• Items linked to imports and exports from Liverpool history – clay pipes, locally made clocks and watches, Herculaneum pottery, tea chests with Liverpool links.
• First World War or home front items linked to Liverpool such as postcards, mementos or photographs
• Carpet bag
• 19th Century Italian lire
• Victorian Knife sharpening equipment or tailoring equipment
• Items related to the Liverpool Overhead Railway
• Docker’s Hook
• Original Beatles records
• 1950s or 1960s transistor radio and TV
• 1960s primary or secondary school text books
• Old-style school desk  – wooden with inkwell
• 1960s Afghan coat Read more…

Equality and diversity policy

11 December 2009 by Karen

Our new Equality and Diversity policy is available to read or download from our main site.

DSC Social Change awards result

27 November 2009 by Karen

certificate with cartoon

Our runners-up certificate

You might remember that we asked you to vote for our Engaging Refugees and Asylum Seekers programme in the DSC Social Change Awards. Unfortunately we didn’t win, but were runners-up which out of 380 proposals and a longlist of 90 is still pretty good. We were also given a certificate featuring a rather fine cartoon from The Spectator and Private Eye cartoonist, Grizelda. Well done to the Papworth Trust who did win the category and ‘thank you’ to everyone who voted. Read more…

Ga Ga over DaDaFest at the World Museum!

26 November 2009 by Lisa

Curator giving a gallery talk

Curator Ashley Cooke gives a tour of the Ancient Egypt gallery with BSL interpretation.

Here’s Treasure House Theatre Co-Ordinator Jo Connor, to tell us about last week’s DaDaFest events at the World Museum!


Last Saturday, the World Museum held a number of inclusive events as part of DaDaFest 2009. Led by Treasure House Theatre demonstrator Paul Netterfield, visitors enjoyed an afternoon of events based on the World Cultures gallery.

The aim was to provide accessible events for visitors from the local deaf and disabled communities and their families. It included a new show from our adult drama group volunteers. The show followed Dr Huw (Dr Who, get it?) as he visited the World Museum to discover more about Earth’s various cultures both past and present. He explored the Egyptian and Ethnographical collections and their collectors. Actors from the group also played the parts of the various collectors who had contributed their objects to the museum in its 150 year history.

Our curators also got involved, with Oceania collections curator Lynne Heidi Stumpe, helping out with research and leading one of the tours. Curator of Ancient Egyptian collections Ashley Cooke, also led a fascinating tour around the Ancient Egypt gallery. We were also lucky to have a number of volunteers who helped out on the day, handing out programmes and creating the background for the show amongst many other things. Read more…

Help us improve access for Disabled and Deaf people

26 November 2009 by Karen

Do you have a passion for museums and galleries?  Are you interested in helping us improve access to our venues for Disabled and Deaf people? 

If you are and you do have the time to commit to it, then National Museums Liverpool would love to hear from you.  We are looking for people who consider themselves to be disabled people to join our Museums Advisory Group.

You will be expected to attend up to 6 meetings in a year.  Members are reimbursed for access costs when attending meetings and receive an attendance allowance. A BSL interpreter is present at all meetings. Read more…

Award success

24 November 2009 by Karen

Four people gatehred around a table

Participants in our Engaging Refugees and Asylum Seekers project.

Good news. Last night our Engaging Refugees and Asylum Seekers project was given a Commended Award in the regeneration category in the Yorkshire Bank 150th Community Awards. More on the project on our Education and Communities pages.

Events for visually impaired visitors

22 October 2009 by Karen

This Saturday (24 October) World Museum is running several events designed for our visually impaired visitors. Each is based around our highly successful ‘The Beat Goes On’ exhibition and covers the people, objects and stories behind Liverpool music history.

Events kick off at 12 noon (there’s a full list of sessions on the exhibition events page), and you’ll need to collect tickets from our information desk as places are limited. For more information contact the information desk on 0151 478 4353. Read more…

BSL supported events this weekend

20 August 2009 by Karen

As you may know, this weekend sees the Slavery Remembrance Day festival – there’s more on the background to the event on our main website. A good number of the weekend’s events are supported with British Sign Language, including Diane Nash’s lecture. There’s a good mix of activities, dramatisations, discussions, lectures and performances. A full list of the supported events can be found on our BSL interpretation events page.

Disability in art

7 December 2006 by Karen

brightly coloured painting of a blind man in robes

Detail from Holman Hunt’s ‘The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple’

There’s an interesting article on the 24 Hour Museum site by Jacob Simon from the National Portrait Gallery on the portrayal of disability in art. Several of the artists mentioned also feature in our collections including Zoffany, Hogarth and Reynolds.

This got me thinking about the portrayal of disability in our own collections, and wondering how much attitudes have changed in the time since these magnificent pieces were painted. Just off the top of my head I can think of the blind man in Holman Hunt’s ‘The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple’ (see image), and three depictions of Nelson (by West, Drummond and Maclise) who at the time of his death was missing an eye and an arm.  

Benjamin Robert Haydon considered himself near blind but still managed to produce several works including ‘Christ Blessing the Little Children’ which was commissioned to decorate a chapel for the blind (this linked page includes his son’s description of Haydon wearing several pairs of spectacles at once). Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.