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We are 10

18 August 2017 by Richard

International Slavery Museum 10th anniversary logologo

The International Slavery Museum is 10. We have had such a journey, done so many things, and met so many people; been involved in controversies, and literally changed people’s lives. So how do you write a blog about all that? Well it’s difficult, so let me take you back to 2008 when we launched our 1st anniversary exhibition rather unsurprisingly titled We Are One. As part of the introduction text I wrote the following:

Integral to the Museum’s interpretation of the story of transatlantic slavery is a belief that Africans, despite their oppression, were the main agents of their own liberation. We hope we represent their stories faithfully. The Museum also sees itself as an active campaigner against racism and discrimination today, and we work closely with a number of human rights organisations. Our Education Centre is named in memory of Anthony Walker, the Black Liverpool teenager who was murdered in 2005…We hope you have been inspired positively by your visit today.

International Slavery Museum’s ‘We Are One’ school logo

I believe we have been faithful to those words in our first 10 years because I, and our small dedicated team, have continually strived for that. I remember meeting Presidents, famous personalities, speaking at UNESCO in Paris and the UN in New York.

I am proud of our partnerships with NGOs and human rights organisations such as Anti-Slavery International, I am proud and honoured to know and work with people like Gee Walker, founder of the Anthony Walker Foundation, and mother of Anthony, I am proud to have made close friendships with many members of the Liverpool Black community, some critical friends, but all who believe in what we do and have supported us on our journey; the late Dorothy Kuya, Eric Lynch, Dr Ray Costello, Councilor Anna Rothery, Michelle Charters and many other historians, activists and community figures, they know who they are. The list of our work and achievements is long, diverse, and powerful.

Blog author, Dr Richard Benjamin, Head of the International Slavery Museum (c) Dave Jones

At the heart of our Museum are real people working conscientiously within a difficult area whilst actively fighting the legacies of transatlantic slavery too. This is not easy, not many museums do it, and so I say to all the people who read this blog who have not visited the Museum to do so, and to keep up to date with our plans, such as opening the Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. building, the iconic building on the Albert Dock, as part of the Museum. Not everyone agrees with what we do, or how we do it but one thing I do know, if the Museum is not here in 10 years time the city and this country will be a worse place for it. So please, join us on our journey and in the words of the great Curtis Mayfield “Keep On, Keepin’ On”.

Read about all our special 10th anniversary events here

Winning On the Waterfront photograph by Bernard Rose now on display

11 May 2016 by Sam Vaux

Winner, Bernard Rose with his winning photograph Ferry Cross The Mersey 1972, holding his original Nikon F camera he used for the photograph in 1972.

Winner, Bernard Rose with his winning photograph Ferry Cross The Mersey 1972, holding his original Nikon F camera he used for the photograph in 1972.

It’s been a busy week at the Museum in the lead up to LightNight this Friday, with a brand new addition now finding pride of place in our On the Waterfront exhibition.

Ferry Cross The Mersey 1972 by local photographer Bernard Rose is the winning photograph in our recent On the Waterfront photography competition, hotly deliberated by our judges from almost 500 entries.

Bernard, accompanied by his wife Enid met deputy director of Merseyside Maritime Museum, Ian Murphy to see his winning entry, which is now on display as part of the exhibition until it closes on 19 June 2016.

Bernard reveals the fascinating story behind his winning photograph Ferry Cross The Mersey 1972: Read more…

Photography competition – be part of our exhibition!

24 March 2016 by Sam Vaux

The print shows two Stevedores standing inactive at the Albert Docks, Liverpool (a stevedore is someone who is employed in the loading or unloading of ships). In the middle distance a ship is moored. This image was also reproduced as a postcard.

Stevedores, Albert Dock, 1945 by Edward Chambré Hardman © National Trust Images; The Hardmans’ House, Liverpool

Could you be the next Edward Chambré Hardman? Our current On the Waterfront exhibition in the Quayside Gallery explores significant changes on Liverpool’s waterfront. Our visitors to the Merseyside Maritime Museum and the Albert Dock are part of that story, and we’d like to include you in this exhibition too! Read more…

On the Waterfront – my office window

12 February 2016 by Sarah Starkey

Photograph of Albert Dock, Liverpool in a derelict state.

Photograph of Albert Dock by Phil Collins, 1982 (Maritime Archives and Library reference PR/623/834/12).

In a previous blog about the On the Waterfront exhibition I named a glass lantern slide view of George’s Dock as one of my favourites. Now I thought I would share another of my favourite images from the exhibition.

Taken in 1982 this photograph shows Albert Dock in a derelict state before the start of the redevelopment work.  Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.