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Posts tagged with 'antiquities'

Animals in the ancient Near East

28 June 2017 by Scott Smith

Jug in the form of a kneeling bull

Jug in the form of a kneeling cow or bull

The ancient Near East was a region that roughly corresponds to the modern Middle East (including Iraq, Turkey, Iran and Syria). World Museum’s Ancient Near East collection contains antiquities from the pre-classical civilisations of the ancient Near East and a selection of highlights from the collections is now available to view online for the first time…

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Revealing classical treasures at World Museum

6 June 2017 by Chrissy Partheni

The classical relief now visible in World Museum’s new cafe. The inscription reads Deus Nobis Haec Otia Fecita: God has given us these days of leisure.

I will never forget my first impression of Liverpool, almost 18 years ago. The impressive architecture of the city with its classical references was definitely an attraction to a Greek. But while it is easy to spot the classical influences on the exterior of Liverpool’s buildings, we often miss their interior decoration. The extension of our brand new café into the Mountford building is an excellent opportunity to view such prime examples and to perhaps think of the reasons why classical antiquity imagery became such an important narrative of civic pride and glory in 19th century Liverpool.

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The pitfalls of recreating a pit burial

The final put burial display.

The final pit burial display.

What colour should the sand be? This was just one of the many things we had to think about when installing the pit burial case for the new Ancient Egypt gallery.

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Spotlight on: Roman Sculpture

2 February 2017 by Chrissy Partheni

Statue of Athena (the 'Ince Athena')

Statue of Athena (the ‘Ince Athena’)

Ancient marble sculpture is irresistibly attractive:  there are strong, ideal and sensual bodies, elaborate folds and drapery, complex hairstyles and realist or ideal faces to admire at.  For centuries Ancient Classical sculpture came to epitomise beauty, to connect physical beauty with spiritual one and often to promote virtue and good citizenship.  But is there more than meets the eye?

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Tokens from the Roman Empire

10 January 2017 by Denise Wilding

PhD student Denise identifying Roman coins

Denise identifying Roman coins © Portable Antiquities Scheme

I’m a PhD student at Warwick University and a member of a European research project investigating the role tokens played in everyday life in the ancient world. My focus is on the Roman period and I am currently looking at tokens from Egypt. As part of my research I visited the World Museum collections… Read more…

Piecing together an excavation

6 September 2016 by Chrissy Partheni

The excavation at Kouklia in progress

The excavation at Kouklia in progress

My mother is from the town of Morphou in Cyprus and I therefore have always felt a special connection with the Cypriot collections in the antiquities department. One significant group is material from Kouklia, from a joint excavation between our museum and St. Andrews University. The excavation was ambitious and of significant scale and attracted a lot of media attention as a result. It was undertaken across five successive seasons from 1950 – 1955. It’s hard to imagine museums having the resource to undertake such a large excavation today in the current economic climate.  Read more…

Our classical collections feature in Biennial exhibition at Tate Liverpool

27 July 2016 by Andrew

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

In April, we told you about Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Antiquities at World Museum and her involvement with this year’s Biennial in Liverpool – read it here. Working alongside curators at Tate Liverpool and Biennial, we were able to loan objects from our classical collections, in particular from Henry Blundell’s sculptural collections, forming part of the Biennial Ancient Greece Episode exhibition there. Chrissy says: Read more…

Exploring the different worlds of our classical sculpture collections

4 April 2016 by Andrew

The Pantheon at Ince Blundell Hall

The Pantheon at Ince Blundell Hall

Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Classical Antiquities at World Museum talks about her involvement with two upcoming exhibitions taking place in the city this summer.

“Last summer the Atkinson Art Gallery and the Liverpool Biennial approached me to discuss potential loans from the classical sculptural collections to feature in two exhibitions planned for this summer. One exhibition will be about Henry Blundell, the 18th century antiquarian and collector, while the other, taking place at Tate Liverpool, is to be inspired by Ancient Greece. Read more…

The husband and wife who excavated pottery from tombs in Cyprus

21 December 2015 by Lynn

Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Antiquities, explores how distinctive red-polished pottery, excavated from tombs in Cyprus in the 1930s, came to be in our collections here in Liverpool.

Bowl from Vounous

A red-polished bowl from our own Vounous pottery collection

“Vounous is in Bellapaise in northern Cyprus and it is a site known for the famous, Early to Middle Bronze Age Cypriot period. Read more…

The temple boys of ancient Cyprus

29 October 2015 by Lynn

Head of a temple boyCurator of Classical Antiquities, Chrissy Partheni tells us of her work on this fascinating sculptural collection from ancient Cyprus.

“Over the last 12 months I have been working on digital records of our antiquities collection of ancient Cyprus limestone pieces.

My first encounter with this collection was seeing lots of boxes in our store, filled with sculptural pieces, mainly heads, all made in limestone, a chalky but light material.  The collection was donated to us in 1872 by Captain Fothergill. We have 125 limestone pieces in total with 11 “Temple boy” statuettes being particularly interesting.   Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.