Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'aquarium'

Celebrate World Oceans Day

6 June 2012 by Lisa

Our staff from the aquarium don’t just work at World Museum, they also head out into the city – and sometimes to the River Mersey – to help spread the word about the importance of looking after our marine life.

This week Alyster Chapman, an Education Demonstrator at the aquarium, is looking forward to celebrating World Oceans Day…


World Oceans Day 2012

On Friday 8 June, the aquarium team will be heading down to Liverpool One with some of our more outgoing animals to celebrate World Oceans Day.  Come down and find us for the chance to get up close to our rock pool animals and even touch some of them!  Read more…

You’ll never look at sharks the same way again!

5 October 2011 by Lisa

Here’s our Education Demonstrator at the Aquarium, Clare Allen, to tell us about her favourite sea animal – the shark! We have some great shark-related activities coming up at World Museum, so read on to find out more…


Face painting

Me and the rest of the aquarium team are busy gearing up for this years European Shark Week. We are particularly excited this year as we are screening the award-winning film ‘Shark Water’ as well as running some fantastic sharky activities. Every year we join up with The Shark Trust to put on activities for European Shark Week – find out about all our sharky fun this year on our ‘Wonderful World’ events page.

When people ask me what my favourite animal in the sea is I have to say the shark. They are truly amazing and charismatic animals, thought they are hugely misunderstood. They have been on this earth since before the dinosaurs and come in all shapes and sizes. My very favourite shark is the Whale Shark. Thought to grow over 20 meters in length it is the largest fish in the sea, but this gentle giant eats only plankton. Read more…

‘Perfect chemistry’ for new coral display

8 July 2011 by Lisa

We always like to let you know when we get some new additions to the World Museum, so here’s our Aquarium Manager Paul Tyson to tell us about his latest news:


Coral display

On 15 July, we will be welcoming 100 guests for a special evening event at World Museum. Members of the marine hobbyist forum ‘Salty Box’ will be coming to donate coral fragments to the aquarium for the newly built coral propagation unit.

The unit involves the latest lighting and filtration methods utilising natural ecosystems to maintain perfect water chemistry for these delicate animals to grow. In return the Salty Box members will be given exclusive access to the aquarium and a tour behind the scenes. Read more…

New arrivals at World Museum

11 May 2011 by Lisa

Here’s Paul Tyson, our Team Leader at the Aquarium, to tell us about some new arrivals at World Museum


Two large blue fish with teeth showing

I’m very pleased that we now have four Atlantic wolf fish, who have come to the World Museum aquarium from the MacDuff Aquarium in Scotland.
 
The Atlantic wolf fish (Anarhichas lupus), also known as the sea wolf, is a marine fish, the largest of the wolf fish family. It has been known to grow to nearly five feet in length. 

I have been keen to bring wolf fish to the aquarium since I started in November. They are extraordinary-looking creatures and I have a bit of a soft spot for them as I have worked with them for 15 years! Feeding time for the wolf fish is fun as these aggressive animals have some serious teeth. However, despite their fearsome appearance Atlantic wolf fish are only a threat to humans when defending themselves out of the water. They also produce a natural antifreeze to keep their blood moving in their cold ocean habitat. Read more…

Green monster loose in the World Museum

11 June 2010 by Lisa

Ever wondered what might happen if one of the animals in the museum escaped? To continue our celebration of the World Museum’s 150th anniversary, we have asked Senior Education Manager of sciences, Mike Graham to tell us about one of his memories from working in the Aquarium in the 1970s…


Fish at the aquarium

Some of Mike’s fishy friends from the aquarium

I started in 1972 at the museum in Liverpool when it was the city museum. We had 26 four-foot, cube shaped, aquaria displaying temperate and tropical marine fish, invertebrates and temperate and tropical freshwater fish. We also had a number of displays of snakes lizards, spiders and other invertebrates. It was a brilliant place to work and in those days it was at the cutting edge of aquarium technology. Every day was different with something new to see and experience. We accepted numerous donations from the general public with surprising results.

We were once offered a large green Iguana which had out grown its owner’s home. It’s owner told us that it was about 4.5 foot long – which we assumed was an exaggeration – and when she appeared with a tiny zipped shopping bag, we thought our assumptions were correct. I made the big mistake of opening it in the public gallery to have a quick look and this 4.5 foot monster poked its head and shoulders out of the bag. How she got it in there in the first place was beyond me! It scanned the area in a nonchalant sort of way and then leapt out and scuttled off down the gallery. We had a marble floor and it wasn’t really able to run on this surface, so it made loads of noise which alerted the visitors and of course lead to absolute pandemonium. I rugby tackled it at the end of the corridors and managed to get back into the lab area. Read more…

From pyramids to underwater exploration

29 April 2010 by Kay C

Have you been catching the latest tweets?

Our Public Lecture Series on Thursday afternoons at World Museum got off to a flying start last week. It continues today, with two great topics: at 2pm – The Recovery of a Fragment of an Egyptian Pyramid; and 2.30pm – Raywatch: Angling for Data. The talks will take place in the Treasure House Theatre and admission is free. See you later!

Save The Frogs!

23 April 2010 by Lisa

Have we ever had a ‘frog blog’ story on our blog before? I don’t think we have! To continue our series of blogs celebrating the World Museum’s 150th anniversary, we’ve got some news from our resident frog fanatic and Aquarist, Phil Lewis. Read on to find out what he’s currently working on at the museum…


Save the Frogs is an international team of scientists, educators, policymakers and naturalists dedicated to protecting the worlds amphibian species: the frogs, toads, newts, salamanders and ceacilians.  It is the first and only public charity dedicated exclusively to amphibian conservation. Read more…

Something for Thursdays

21 April 2010 by Kay C

Thursday afternoons are never going to be the same again…

I am really excited about our new Spring 2010 Public Lecture Series, which kicks off tomorrow (April 22). It’s being held at the Treasure House Theatre, World Museum, and features a selection of subjects from our museums and galleries’ collections and exhibitions, from archaeology to contemporary slavery.

For the next four Thursdays, our curators will be talking about some of the fascinating things they have researched. Read more…

Statues and sea-life

19 March 2010 by Lisa

It’s time to peer back into the mists of time again in our series of blogs celebrating World Museum’s 150th anniversary…

On 16 March 2004, during building work on a new entrance and atrium, a traffic warden threatened to give a parking ticket to the crane moving exhibits at the front of the museum in William Brown Street!

Two, two-metre black stone statues of the Egyptian Goddesses Sekhmet were taken from display in the museum’s current entrance and craned down the street to the new entrance. The operation was followed by a photographer from the Liverpool Echo, and he photographed parking attendants as they threatened to fine the crane driver. On 17 March the story appeared in the Echo under the headline ‘Warden tries to book crane as it moves museum statues’. On the next day the story was picked up by the Scotsman, Daily Mirror, Daily Express and several regional papers. The Sun ran a picture story and the news went round the world to the Sydney Morning Herald. Read more…

Voyage of discovery

13 January 2010 by Lisa

Here is this week’s post celebrating the World Museum’s 150th anniversary this year! This week we have a story from Ian Wallace, our Curator of Conchology & Aquatic Biology. Read on to find out about the staff who travelled on a luxury steam yacht to collect new specimens for the museum…


Henry H Higgins

Henry H Higgins

On January 16th 1876 the Museum’s Director, Reverend Henry Hugh Higgins, and museum assistants John Chard and James Wood, left Liverpool on board the brand new luxury steam yacht ‘Argo’.  This had been chartered by Mr Holt of Sudley Art Gallery fame (now called Sudley House), for a cruise to the West Indies and museum workers were invited along to collect scientifically important specimens for the Liverpool Museum (now called the World Museum).  The museum authorities allocated Higgins £50 to cover all costs for the three of them and to purchase specimens.  He spent  £43 and 10d (10 pennies) !   

They were especially interested in collecting marine life and they focussed on sponges.  A sponge is one of the least complicated of all animal groups.  There are lots of cells in the sponge body but there is no organising brain or nervous system and no complicated body organs.  The whole body is a mass of small channels lined by cells that have a beating hair.  These beating cells draw in water and other cells grab tiny single-celled plants floating in the water, digest the plant cells and pass some of the digested food to their neighbours.  Other cells secrete a supporting skeleton of horny fibres or glass fibres. Read more…

About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

Award-winning blog

corpcomms awards winner logo

Subscribe

RSS RSS Feed

Disclaimer

We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.