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Posts tagged with 'archaeology'

Park pipes

15 October 2015 by Jeff

Three 'Morgan' stamped pipes excavated at Calderstones Park

Three ‘Morgan’ stamped pipes excavated at Calderstones Park

The Museum of Liverpool archaeologists have been analysing finds from our excavations at Calderstones Park, which ran in spring, in partnership with the Reader Organisation. During this finds work I have noticed some interesting parallels between the clay tobacco pipes found there and at the Manchester Dock, the site under the Museum of Liverpool. Read more…

Money talks

28 September 2015 by Jeff

1899 penny

1899 penny

Following our recent excavation at Calderstones Park in partnership with the Reader Organisation, the Museum of Liverpool archaeology team have been working with volunteers on the post excavation analysis of the finds.  Read more…

Roundhouses, rubbish and Romans

7 September 2015 by Liz

The evidence of the buildings is being analysed, and they seem to have been constructed in clay and timber and may have been round-houses similar to this

The evidence of the buildings is being analysed, and they seem to have been constructed in clay and timber and may have been round-houses similar to this

Mark Adams, Archaeological Project Officer, tells us about one of his latest, and favourite, finds:

“A team of archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology North and the Museum of Liverpool have recently excavated a Romano-British settlement at Burton, Cheshire Read more…

Lunt Meadows – where history and archaeologists are made

12 August 2015 by Sam

fields of long grass

Lunt Meadows

In this guest blog post Sally Taylor describes her experience working with the Archaeology team from the Museum of Liverpool on a recent excavation:

“For a non-professional archaeologist it can be difficult to find excavations without paying vast sums of money to join training digs. As a mature student with three years studying archaeology under my belt, I was hungry for experience in the field.

Enter Lunt Meadows.   Read more…

Treasure acquired for the region!

20 July 2015 by Liz

old brooches

Brooches from the Knutsford Hoard

Great news! The Museum of Liverpool and Congleton Museum have received £65,400 from the Heritage Lottery Fund for an exciting project that will help to acquire two locally-discovered hoards of Roman treasure.

The Hoards of Cheshire project will enable us to acquire the Knutsford and Malpas hoards for the region, and create a small exhibition around them, which will tour. Read more…

Summer fun for young archaeologists!

16 July 2015 by Liz

children in a workshop with a woman in period clothing

School’s out for the summer next week! If you’re looking for an interesting way for your child (aged 8-17) to spend a few days over the holidays, try our Young Archaeologists’ Club summer school workshops!

Tuesday 28 July 2015: Sheep to Shirt
A day of hand-on activities to explore what people wore in the past and how things were made: dyed, woven, braided, and sewn! How did the Vikings wash their socks? Why were nettles so important in clothing? Read more…

We dig football!

13 July 2015 by Liz

old map showing houses and fields, with one property highlighted

Detail from James Newlands’ 1847 map of Liverpool showing the Queen’s Head. Courtesy of Digital Archives Association http://digitalarchives.co.uk/

This weekend, on Saturday 18 July, our archaeologists will be heading out looking for a pub – but this one won’t serve them a pint, it’s the site of an important historical event, and is under the ground!

The Museum of Liverpool archaeology team will be leading a community excavation in search of the Queen’s Head, Village Street, Everton in partnership with Friends of Everton Park . We’re looking to find the spot where the agreement was made to rename St Domingo’s Football Club – it became Everton FC in 1879, and from this time grew in size, and became a founder member of the Football League in 1888.

Local historian and former Liverpool Echo sports editor Ken Rogers, author of the best-selling ‘Lost Tribes of Everton’ books has undertaken considerable research about the building, and has discovered Read more…

Scouse hair-rollers from the past

6 July 2015 by Liz

small ceramic bar

18th century wig curler found during excavations before the construction of the Crown Court in Liverpool

The HAIR exhibition in the Museum of Liverpool explores how Black hair styles have evolved and how they reflect wider social change and political movements. It considers the ways in which hairstyles have reflected status, identity and creativity from early African origins to the present. As an archaeologist this got me thinking about what we might be able to interpret about Black British people’s hairstyles from archaeological evidence.   Read more…

Time capsule discovery – a glimpse of Liverpool life, 1856

29 June 2015 by Kay

Get a glimpse of Liverpool’s history with this time capsule, which was recently acquired by the museum and is on display until 27 July 2015 as part of the Festival of Archaeology.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

This intriguing time capsule was recently unearthed by builder John Connell during renovation work at the ‘Scandinavian Hotel’ on the corner of Nelson Street in the city centre. Developer, Downing converted the building into student accommodation, The Arch, after it lay derelict for many years.

The building was originally constructed as a workshop, warehouse and showroom for Abbott’s Cabinet Makers. The foundation stone, embedded with the time capsule, was laid on Tuesday 9 December, 1856 by the owner Samuel Abbott Esquire. Several members of the Abbott family, along with Henry Summers, Architect and Jones and Co., builders were also present.  Read more…

Maya world: a rainforest civilisation

23 June 2015 by Ann

Temple of Five Floors, Edzna

Edificio de los Cinco Pisos, or Temple of Five Floors, Edzna Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes – Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia – Fotógrafo Ignacio Guevara.

The ancient Mayas built one of the world’s most successful and brilliant civilisations, tantalising remains of which survive.  Colossal stone cities were the centre of Maya culture.  These cities were home to dramatic pyramids that housed temples and the palaces of the Royal courts.  Here they developed a complex writing system and recorded their own history.    Read more…

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