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24-Hour Painty People

14 November 2018 by Ann Bukantas

Contact sheet of images of John Moores with artists from the 1974 competition

The Walker Art Gallery‘s archive is full of voices from the past – letters from artists, including the Pre-Raphaelites, notes from early curators and fascinating information from scholars passing judgement on paintings. The John Moores Painting Prize too has left the Walker with an archive, which stretches back 60 years since the inaugural exhibition in 1957.

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Everyone welcome – especially unicorns

28 September 2018 by Ann

Unicorns learning about life in the Eighteenth century!

The Lady Lever Art Gallery was named in memory of Lord Lever’s wife Elizabeth and was built to house an art collection to share with Lever’s soap factory workers.  It’s always been about community and inclusion and today is no different.  It’s not uncommon for us to hear parents say they don’t think the gallery is for them as they fear they’ll be too noisy or it’ll go over the kids’ heads.  We’d like to shout from the top of our beautiful glass domes that we love noise, creativity and little ones and we’d love you to come and visit! Read more…

Teacher’s Evening – Get Involved!

24 September 2018 by Matt

Children in Museum

School visit

Want your class to experience a bit of hard work – Victorian style?  Ever fancied packing them off permanently on a ship to faraway climes?  Here’s your opportunity to find out how we can make this happen! Read more…

Sir Francis Seymour Haden: Breaking Up of the Agamemnon, No 1 (1870)

24 August 2018 by Ha-il Kim

Breaking Up of the Agamemnon, No 1 (1870), by Sir Francis Seymour Haden, Walker Art Gallery

As a volunteer at the Walker Art Gallery, I have been helping Exhibition Curator, Alex Patterson, to digitise works related to the Whistler and Pennell: Etching the City exhibition, currently on display at the Lady Lever Art Gallery. This exhibition explores the role that James McNeill Whistler and Joseph Pennell played in the Etching Revival (1830-1940) in Britain. It also shows how their contemporaries, such as Sir Francis Seymour Haden (1818-1910), Charles Méryon (1821-1868), and William Strang (1859-1921), were influenced by their art.

One of the etchings that really caught my interest was Breaking Up of the Agamemnon by Sir Francis Seymour Haden, which was one of three works by him included in the exhibition. It shows a large hulk of a vessel being demolished. The vessel is HMS Agamemnon, the Royal Navy battleship moored at the Naval Arsenal at Deptford on the River Thames, seen against the setting sun. Launched in 1852, the 230-feet long Agamemnon was one of the most intimidating of all wooden warships and the first British steam-powered flagship. The Agamemnon saw action in many battles, including the Crimean War, and was the predecessor of iron-hulled ships, which were introduced in the 1860s.

Breaking Up of the Great Eastern, No 2, 1890, by Sir Frank Short, Walker Art Gallery

Breaking Up of the Agamemnon reminded me of another etching, Breaking Up of the Great Eastern, No 2 (1890) by Sir Frank Short (1857-1945), also in the Walker Art Gallery collection. I came across the etching when I was researching scenes of Liverpool Docks. Both ships had illustrious histories, and I felt that the images of their breaking up expressed a deep sense of loss and sorrow.

Haden’s etching of the Agamemnon was a spontaneous response to what he saw on the Thames one day in July 1870, but it became the most important subject of his career, which he continued to work on over the next 16 years.

Early in 1870 the art scholar, artist and etcher Philip Gilbert Hamerton (1834-1894) asked Haden to etch a plate to be published in the first edition of his new art journal, The Portfolio (1870-1893). The journal, named after a folder in which collectors often kept valuable prints, championed etching as original art, rather than a reproductive medium. This concept played an instrumental role in the British etching revival during the second half of the 19th century. Haden, like the French Impressionists, always tried to work directly from life, and for this purpose, he always carried prepared copper plates wherever he went. He drew directly onto the plate to capture the movement of the light and its reflections in the sky, clouds, and water. The demolition of the Agamemnon may not have been a traditional subject for a study of ambiance, but Haden must have been entranced by its grandeur and spectacle.

In a letter to Hamerton, dated July 3, 1870, Haden wrote of the Agamemnon etching: “. . . I had thought of making the sun set behind the old hulk and the distant cupolas of Greenwich and of using the sinking luminary as typical of the departing glories of both . . . .” This shows that Haden indeed drew the initial sketch for Breaking Up of the Agamemnon, No 1 directly onto the copper plate. The sun is setting between the ship and Greenwich, conveying a poignant majestic reference to the glorious history of the Agamemnon. The rays of the setting sun rippling through the clouds are echoed on the stirring water in the foreground. Named after Agamemnon, the King of Mycenae who led the united Greek army to the Trojan War, the ship proudly displays the figurehead wearing a Roman centurion’s plumed helmet pointing towards the sun. The Agamemnon almost appears as if ready to set sail once again into the distant horizon. Although she is now tethered to a much smaller barge, with her ribs exposed and only one of three masts standing, the Agamemnon still looks magnificent. The image highlights the ship’s immense scale and power, but it also conveys a sense an ending.

Breaking Up of the Agamemnon was a very complex project for Haden. He said he had “never undertook a more perplexing job.” The initial spontaneity of etching was followed by many attempts at adding and deleting small details throughout the composition, resulting in 11 states (versions of the print) being made in total. However, the main image of the ship against a shimmering evening sun remained largely unchanged.

Breaking Up of the Agamemnon, No 1 was an artistic and commercial success. The plate was unfortunately too large to be printed in The Portfolio and instead was later published by Frederick Goulding, and sold through Colnaghi’s, bringing Haden a huge financial reward. The plate was so popular that he produced a second version of the subject Breaking Up of the Agamemnon, No 2 (1886) in mezzotint.

As for the etching Haden promised to Hamerton for the first edition of The Portfolio Hamerton instead selected another of Haden’s prints, entitled A Brig at Anchor (1870), which is also in the Walker Art Gallery collection. He etched it from nature by moonlight on the Thames.

A Brig at Anchor (1870) by Sir Francis Seymour Haden, Walker Art Gallery

To discover more about the art of etching and to enjoy Haden’s intricate works at first hand don’t miss Whistler and Pennell: Etching the City at the Lady Lever Art Gallery until 7 October and the fascinating video made by Liverpool John Moores University School of Art and Design explaining the process of etching.

 

 

 

Martin Greenland – the earlier years

24 August 2018 by Andrew

Martin Greenland’s Before Vermeer’s Clouds, winner of John Moores 24, 2006.

Cumbria-based artist Martin Greenland won the John Moores Painting Prize in 2006 with his painting Before Vermeer’s Clouds. It was not his first time in the exhibition, having been selected for the John Moores several times before that. Here, Martin tells us about those earlier paintings, and how it felt to get through. His thought-provoking blog is an insight into the emotional responses an artist can face, even upon selection.

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Reminders of Liverpool’s lost castle

30 July 2018 by Liz

castle model in museum display

Model of Liverpool Castle in the History Detectives gallery at the Museum of Liverpool © Mark McNulty

When visitors to the Museum of Liverpool reach the first floor, they’re often surprised to be greeted, right at the top of the stairs, by a model of a castle! Castles possibly aren’t something you especially associate with Liverpool, but the town did have one from around 1235 to the 1730s.  Read more…

Remember Love at Double Fantasy

31 May 2018 by Laura

Visitor in exhibition

Double Fantasy – John & Yoko at Museum of Liverpool until 22 April 2019

We are thrilled to have welcomed more than 20,000 visitors already to our latest exhibition Double Fantasy – John & Yoko, which has now been open for two weeks. Read more…

Half term fun

24 May 2018 by Megan

 

Half-term is upon us and National Museums Liverpool has a fantastic range of activities to keep the whole family busy. Read more…

Architectural lines – a drawing and print workshop with Kathryn Edwards

17 May 2018 by Ann

Workshop leader Kathryn Edwards

Kathryn Edwards is an Artist and Musician. She will be delivering line drawing workshops at the Lady Lever Art Gallery in Port Sunlight on 9 June and 24 July as part of the Whistler and Pennell: Etching the city exhibition.

In this blog we give a background to Kathryn as a workshop leader, an insight into how the work of Whistler and Pennell sparked the inspiration for these workshops, which are suitable for beginners and experienced artists alike and all about creating confidence. Kathryn’s art is about interpretation and in this free workshop she wants visitors to feel every line created is the right one, no erasers needed!

Places on the workshop are free but spaces are limited, advance booking via Eventbrite is essential.

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The Shape of Water

14 May 2018 by Ann Bukantas

Water presents artists with a restless, ever-changing technical challenge. As representations of H2O go, there are some undisputed masterpieces in the Walker Art Gallery’s collection, including Monet’s Breaking up of the ice on the Seine, near Bennecourt, Courbet’s Low Tide at Trouville and Sickert’s The Bathers, Dieppe. Water even provides the backdrop to Fournier’s sombre ‘The Funeral of Shelley’, which is set on a beach – all very fitting, given that the poet drowned at sea in 1822.

Fournier’s ‘The Funeral of Shelley’

With the wet stuff in mind, there is a surprising amount of water too in the Walker’s current display of John Moores Painting Prize first prize winners, which we are celebrating as part of the 60th anniversary of the Prize.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.