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Posts tagged with 'China'

The Chinese Labour Corps – ‘Labour conquers all’

9 August 2018 by Karen O'Rourke

Men

Chinese Labour Corps Image: W J Hawkings Collection, courtesy of John de Lucy

At the eastern side of Anfield Cemetery, there is a strip of land where the Liverpool Chinese community are buried. Given that Liverpool is home to the oldest Chinese Community in Europe, these graves are hardly a surprising sight. What is surprising perhaps, are the five small white Commonwealth War Graves clustered together in the middle. They are the graves of men from the Chinese Labour Corps (CLC) who died in Liverpool in 1917 and 1918. Lui Feng Hsiang, the last of the five men to be buried, died 100 years ago today (Thu 9 Aug). Born and raised in China, how did these men come to be buried in foreign soil so far away from home?

Read more…

Dragons in China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors

16 June 2018 by Joe

This weekend marks the Chinese holiday of the Dragon Boat Festival, an ancient celebration where boats are decorated in the form of dragons and raced in towns and cities across the country. To commemorate the festivities, we are exploring some of the dragon-themed objects on display in our landmark exhibition, China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors.

Read more…

Chinese contemporary art in Liverpool

10 May 2018 by Sam

screen showing video artwork in St George's Hall

Susan Pui San Lok, ‘Trailers (from RoCH Fans and Legends)’. Photograph Pete Carr

At the Walker Art Gallery we have had a long interest in Chinese contemporary art, and the John Moores Painting Prize China was launched in August 2010. Since then the five prizewinning paintings from the John Moores Painting Prize China have been displayed as part of each John Moores Painting Prize exhibition – you can see this year’s from 14 July to 18 November at the Walker Art Gallery.

Read more…

China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors in numbers

4 May 2018 by Jennifer Grindley

 

China’s First Emperor, Qin Shi Huang

 

From the tender age  Qin Shi Huang first became king to the enormous terracotta army built to protect him for eternity, we delve into some of the astonishing numbers that make up the story of China’s First Emperor and his world-famous burial site. Read more…

Who was China’s First Emperor?

16 February 2018 by Jennifer Grindley

China’s First Emperor, Qin Shi Huang, was born on this day (18 February) in 259 BC – that’s 2,277 years ago! Famed for his army of terracotta warriors built to protect him for eternity, the Emperor is also one of the most controversial figures in history. Seen as a visionary by some and a tyrant by others, his achievements in such a short space of time were nevertheless remarkable and far-reaching. On his birthday, we take a closer look at the life of the man at the heart of our landmark exhibition.  Read more…

Guest blog: Yan Preston on her work, ‘Now and Before’

24 April 2017 by Laura

Man

Yihao, student and amateur footballer, Wyncote Sports Grounds, Liverpool, 2016 © Yan Preston.

As part of Look/17 Yan Preston’s ‘Now and Before’ is on display on Museum of Liverpool‘s media wall and within Liverpool One shopping district.

In this guest blog Yan tells us more about the project: Read more…

“Freud was always my favourite artist…”

29 April 2014 by Lisa

Zeng Fanzhi talking about 'Interior at Paddington'

Zeng Fanzhi talking about ‘Interior at Paddington’

Zeng Fanzhi, one of the world’s top contemporary artists, visited the Walker Art Gallery earlier this year while judging the John Moores Painting Prize.

It was a really exciting opportunity to not only meet but also interview such a renowned artist – especially a Chinese artist – as this is not something that happens every day! Zeng seemed to really enjoy talking a tour of the gallery and then telling myself and Sandra (Director of Art Galleries) about his favourite painting from the gallery, Read more…

Chinese New Year!

8 February 2013 by Lucy

Most of us have already celebrated the New Year, and enough time has passed that we have made – and broken – New Year’s resolutions a plenty!

If like me you’ve taken a while to get started with your plans to start a new fitness regime or take up a new hobby, why not have another crack at starting a fresh this Sunday, with the dawning of the Chinese New Year.

2013 is the Year of the Snake, and World Museum can certainly boast a lot of snakes in its collections. You can visit the Clore Natural History Centre to see some of the snake specimens and skeletons on display, or have a look at our online collection if you really want to have a good nose at what’s in our stores. Read more…

Free copies of the John Moores China catalogue

21 December 2012 by Karen

Galleries are fab places during the Christmas holidays. They’re quiet, uplifting, not the television, and you leave feeling slightly virtuous before returning to the orgy of chocolate and booze that has been your diet for most of December. And in the case of our venues, they’re totally free.

If you wander to the Walker this festive season to catch the John Moores Painting Prize before it closes on 6 January, you’ll no doubt see the rather large and rather excellent prize winners from the John Moores China exhibition. These are just five of the 63 pieces from the Shanghai exhibition, all of which are featured in the Chinese exhibition catalogue. In the spirit of festive generosity we’re giving away this Chinese catalogue for free to anyone who buys a copy of our own John Moores exhibition catalogue. Read more…

Ready to set sail…

23 November 2011 by Gemma

Main sail before treatment and junk after conservation

Main sail before treatment and junk after conservation

The conservation of the Chinese junk from Swatow is now complete. Being such an interesting project, I will briefly share the treatment processes which have transformed a dirty, unstable model, back to its original beauty.

Firstly the hull and wooden components required cleaning. The model was vacuumed to remove any loose dirt on the deck and inside the bulkheads. After testing to find the safest, and most effective cleaning materials, the hull was cleaning using detergent in deionised water, which made a huge difference to the models appearance, as the shine of the wood oil can now be appreciated. The painted surfaces on the model were carefully cleaned using saliva, which is a surprisingly effective cleaning material. Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.