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Posts tagged with 'collections'

On the Waterfront

25 November 2015 by Sarah Starkey

Black and white image of ships and warehouses, Georges Dock, Liverpool, 1874

Glass lantern slide of George’s Dock and Goree Warehouses – Liverpool c1874 – courtesy of National Museums Liverpool, Merseyside Maritime Museum

For the last few months I’ve been working on an exhibition that is based around Liverpool Waterfront. Its aim is to explain the buildings that line the Mersey from Kings Dock to Princes Dock. Considering that includes Albert Dock, the Three Graces and the Landing Stage, that is quite a wide brief, Read more…

Objects from the voyages of Captain James Cook

24 November 2015 by Emma

16677-RI 28.18Liverpool’s ethnology collections hold a small number of objects relating to the voyages of Captain James Cook (1728-1779). Cook made three voyages to the Pacific and Americas collecting both new knowledge, and also objects and specimens. Read more…

HIV – fighting fear with education

20 November 2015 by Matt

Matt and John Walter by a huge pink inflatable sculpture

The launch of the Pug Virus installation.

Not that long ago I met up with artist John Walter as he unveiled his Pug Virus at the Walker Art Gallery. The installation, a massive bright pink representation of the HIV Virus, got me thinking about how HIV and other sexually transmitted infections have been represented in Merseyside across the years.

Many people will remember the information campaigns of the mid 1980s which used icebergs, mountains and falling monoliths to shock and scare people into taking precautions against catching the HIV/AIDS virus. Some of them were documented in the Now+then display, at the Museum of Liverpool earlier this year. These ‘doom-laden’ fear-inducing adverts, shot in blues and greys and black, seem a far cry from the bright pink creation of John Walter. How did we get from one representation to the other?  Read more…

Introducing our collection of snakes, lizards and frogs

17 November 2015 by Lynn

Tony looking at snakes in a jarTony Parker, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology, reveals the weird and wonderful collection of reptiles and amphibians… in jars!

“One of the things I find compelling about our collection of reptiles and amphibians is that they are stored in glass jars with strange-looking fluids, as if they are museum specimens straight out of the Victorian era. In fact, most of the specimens are actually from a much later period, including significant additions to the collection in the 1950s and 60s. Read more…

Things turn up in the strangest places…

16 November 2015 by Sharon

ornate clock

Silver plated clock dedicated to William Neale, Station Master at Riverside Station. Accession number MOL.2015.77

Riverside Station was a bustling station on the Liverpool waterfront between 1895 and 1971, built to transfer passengers from transatlantic liners onto trains bound for London and the South.

An article in The Liverpool Review on 1 February 1896 stated that:

“there is probably no passenger terminus in the kingdom so conveniently placed in relation to the sea, and the passenger traffic from port to port, as the Liverpool Riverside Station.”

We have several objects relating to the station in our collection including a signal box, station sign, drawings and tickets. We were recently offered this clock connected to the station, with a fascinating story behind it.  Read more…

The temple boys of ancient Cyprus

29 October 2015 by Lynn

Head of a temple boyCurator of Classical Antiquities, Chrissy Partheni tells us of her work on this fascinating sculptural collection from ancient Cyprus.

“Over the last 12 months I have been working on digital records of our antiquities collection of ancient Cyprus limestone pieces.

My first encounter with this collection was seeing lots of boxes in our store, filled with sculptural pieces, mainly heads, all made in limestone, a chalky but light material.  The collection was donated to us in 1872 by Captain Fothergill. We have 125 limestone pieces in total with 11 “Temple boy” statuettes being particularly interesting.   Read more…

Jet the dog – Liverpool superhero (to curators and small boys!)

19 October 2015 by Kay

man in uniform with a black dog

Painting of Jet by Alfred Kemp Wiffen, 1949. Presented by Mrs Babcock Cleaver in 1967, accession number WAG 7004

Jet has always been a hero close to my heart. I was initially introduced to his story whilst working on my first exhibition here at National Museums Liverpool – Spirit of the Blitz at Merseyside Maritime Museum in 2003. We included the bronze bust and oil painting shown here of Jet, from the Walker Art Gallery collections, which took pride of place. The exhibition even had a specially designed Jet the Dog children’s trail. We also interviewed his owner’s daughter, Lillias Ward about Jet’s wartime heroics Read more…

Kongo figure at the Met Museum, New York

19 October 2015 by Zachary

Mangaaka Nkisi nkondi “power figure”), Kongo, Mayombe, Dem. Rep. Congo. About 1900. Gift of O Sonnerburg through A. Ridyard.

Mangaaka Nkisi nkondi “power figure”), Kongo, Mayombe, Dem. Rep. Congo. About 1900. Gift of O Sonnerburg through A. Ridyard.

Last month Mangaaka (, one of World Museum’s most impressive Kongo figures from Central Africa, joined 146 other Kongo-related exhibits in a major exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The ‘Kongo: Power and Majesty exhibition tells the story of Kongo history and creativity over 500 years. Mangaaka is displayed in the final hall of the exhibition, which includes a dramatic display of fourteen other magnificent Mangaaka figures borrowed from various institutions in Europe and the U.S.A.   Read more…

Appeal – is this you in the photograph?

13 October 2015 by Kay

Mother and sons with Jubilee decorations

Silver Jubilee street party, June 1977, Old Swan, Liverpool

Our display Growing up in the city: in photographs features a range of fantastic photographs depicting Liverpool childhoods from the 1870s to the 1990s, from the Museum of Liverpool’s collections.

After searching through many postcards, photographs and glass plate negatives in our stores, it was a hard choice to select the final 25 images. I could have included so many more – especially as I wanted to ensure that lots of different children and childhoods were represented.

One of my favourites is this image of a young mum, with presumably her two young sons in Old Swan – Ulster Road, we believe. It was taken in June 1977 by local photographer, Harold Douglas Avington. Read more…

Women’s Suffrage in Liverpool – the campaign for the right to vote

9 October 2015 by Kay

sculpture of woman holding a 'votes for women' sign

Statue of Mary Bamber – A Revolutionary Woman

On 12 October a new film Suffragette is released. If you’re interested in the local campaign to give women the right to vote you should visit our display, Taking liberties – women’s suffrage in Liverpool. The display was created in partnership with the 1918 Club, a local discussion forum for women established in 1918 by Eleanor Rathbone, a prominent politician and campaigner.

1918 is a significant year for many reasons, but particularly as this was the year that the campaign to give women the right to vote gained success with the Representation of the People Act, which gave the vote to tax-paying women over the age of 30.

Many prominent Liverpool people fought for this basic right. Read more…

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