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More Pride online!

23 February 2017 by Kay

Statuette of standing Hermaphrodite

Pride and Prejudice is our groundbreaking project to put online the social history collections held at the Museum of Liverpool, and the fine and decorative art collections at Sudley House, Walker and Lady Lever art galleries, that have an LGBT connection. We’re excited to launch the final themes today, coinciding with LGBT History Month and the OUTing the past event at the Museum of Liverpool this weekend.
Read more…

Activism shapes our collections

16 February 2017 by Mitty

Taking a closer look at our activism timeline at the Sankofa project launch event.

As part of the Sankofa Project we have started to explore Black activism in Liverpool. An activist is a person who campaigns to bring about political or social change. These words can definitely be used to describe Chief Bassey Duke Ephraim (also known as Bassey Orok Edem). I first became aware of him when speaking to the Zachary Kingdon , curator of African Collections. Zachary tells us more about Chief Bassey and his connections to Liverpool.  Read more…

Spotlight on: Roman Sculpture

2 February 2017 by Chrissy Partheni

Statue of Athena (the 'Ince Athena')

Statue of Athena (the ‘Ince Athena’)

Ancient marble sculpture is irresistibly attractive:  there are strong, ideal and sensual bodies, elaborate folds and drapery, complex hairstyles and realist or ideal faces to admire at.  For centuries Ancient Classical sculpture came to epitomise beauty, to connect physical beauty with spiritual one and often to promote virtue and good citizenship.  But is there more than meets the eye?

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Centenary of the sinking of White Star Line’s Laurentic

25 January 2017 by Ellie

Laurentic at Belfast

MCR/82/167 Copyright unknown, believed to be expired

As we continue to mark the centenary of the First World War, I wanted to highlight a Liverpool ship that was lost on 25 January 1917.

Laurentic (originally named Alberta) was built in Belfast by Harland & Wolff in 1908 for the Dominion Line. During construction, Alberta and her sister ship Albany were purchased by White Star Line and were renamed Laurentic and Megantic.  Laurentic departed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Canada in 1909, and over the next few years carried thousands of passengers across the Atlantic. Read more…

LGBT artwork marks Saint Sebastian Feast day

20 January 2017 by Lynn

St SebastianMarking the Feast of Saint Sebastian today, Lynn Wray serves up a slice of LGBT art history, from her work as researcher in our Pride and Prejudice research project.

“On the 20th January 287 AD, Saint Sebastian was killed by the Roman emperor Diocletian for his Christian beliefs. On this day, every year, people come together to celebrate the feast day of the Christian martyr. San Sebastian in Spain, is transformed with the sound of drums and barrels, as parades march through the city and flags are hoisted. To celebrate, today we offer our own small ‘Pride and Prejudice’ salute to the Saint. Read more…

Victorian Treasures: to Japan and back

11 January 2017 by Alex Patterson

Victorian Treasures is a new exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery featuring some of the world’s most famous 19th– and early 20th– century Pre-Raphaelite and Romantic paintings. It’s been a long time in the making and has traveled thousands of miles already – from Liverpool to Japan and back…. Read more…

The mysterious Master of Frankfurt

22 December 2016 by Scott Smith

virgin-and-child

‘The Holy Family with Music Making Angels’ by the Master of Frankfurt

‘The Holy Family with Music Making Angels’ by the mysterious ‘Master of Frankfurt’ is one of the many glorious 16th century paintings in the Walker Art Gallery’s collection. Whilst undertaking restoration of the painting, our conservator David Crombie discovered that the anonymous painter may have left more of himself in the painting than he realised…

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Bequest saves an original Liverpool Overhead Railway signal

12 December 2016 by Sharon

train on elevated rail tracks above the roofs of buildings

Liverpool Overhead Railway approaching James Street Station. Accession number MOL.2008.97.13

This month we are marking the 60th anniversary of the day that Liverpool Overhead Railway closed, on 30 December 1956. I will be giving a free talk about the iconic railway and the impact it had on the city at 2pm on Thursday 15 December 2016.

You can see highlights from our collection in a new online feature: Liverpool Overhead Railway – the end of the line. I’m also very pleased to bring you news of a new restoration project.

Hidden underground for nearly sixty years, an original wall-mounted signal was one of the few remaining parts of the Liverpool Overhead Railway. It had been in position in the tunnel leading to Dingle Station since the southern extension to the railway opened in 1896 and was part of its innovative signalling system.  Read more…

New LGBT objects uncovered

5 December 2016 by Kay

Shaun Duggan with cup of tea

Shaun Duggan

Two new themes, Love and Relationships and Sex and Eroticism (what everyone’s been waiting for!) have now been launched as part of our Pride and Prejudice research project.

We have discovered some fascinating objects in our collections which tell a range of stories and histories. Some of my highlights featured are – Read more…

Christopher Wood uncovered

28 November 2016 by Olympia Diamond

Still Life with Tureen and Fruit by Christopher Wood

Still Life with Tureen and Fruit by Christopher Wood after treatment and conservation works

In 2016 the opportunity to investigate and conserve the painting, Still Life with Tureen and Fruit, 1925 by British Artist Christopher Wood (1901-1930) arose when the painting was requested for loan to an exhibition at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester.  Wood, born in Knowsley, Merseyside, was an early pioneer of British modern art and the exhibition, titled Christopher Wood: Sophisticated Primitive 2 July – 2 October 2016, was the first retrospective of Wood’s career since 1979. It was an exciting chance to breathe new life in his work.

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.