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Posts tagged with 'collections'

International Women’s Day at Sudley

3 March 2014 by Louise

Picture of Emma Holt as a child

Young Emma Holt

International Women’s Day has been recognised since the early 1900s and is now officially takes place on 8 March every year. The day celebrates the social, political and economic achievements that women have made and also highlights the areas that need attention. Read more…

Processing clay tobacco pipes with the archaeology department!

27 February 2014 by Sam Rowe

Copyright National Museums Liverpool

Emily working on the pipe collection

Here is a post from one of our volunteers on the Rainford’s Roots community archaeology project.  Emily spent time with the archaeology team archiving over 8,000 clay pipes; here she explains the stages of recording: Read more…

Exploring Asia at World Museum

6 February 2014 by Felicity

 

Miniature of a Mughal courtier

Miniature of a Mughal courtier

World Museum’s astounding collections are incredibly vast and varied. So much so, that we’re still exploring and learning more about many of them! This is definitely true of our paper-based Asia collections, as Emma Martin, Head of Ethnology and Curator of Asia Collections, explains: Read more…

New Liverpool Irish Community Trail launched today

13 January 2014 by Kay

Irish community poster, 1867

Irish community poster, 1867

Visitors to the Museum of Liverpool can explore the story of the Liverpool Irish community on display across the Museum, using our new trail.

The trail highlights unique and fascinating objects, people and stories.

Discover our earliest links across the Irish Sea over 4000 years ago and explore how Irish people, culture and traditions continue to shape the social, political and economic history of the city.

Pick up your free trail from the information desk in the atrium.

Wondrous Place remembers Eric’s

23 December 2013 by Lucy

Plaque being installed

The plaque is installed in the Wondrous Place gallery

We recently installed a very special object in the Wondrous Place gallery at the Museum of Liverpool, to commemorate a Liverpool basement venue which had a legendary impact on the Merseyside music scene.

Opposite the site of the original Cavern Club, the music club Eric’s was also situated in Mathew Street. Opened in 1976 by Roger Eagle and Ken Testi – later joined by Pete Fulwell – Eric’s was only in existence for four years but the influence of the club and Roger Eagle, was massive.

Although Eric’s was known nationally as a ‘punk club’, Roger promoted and supported all kinds of music, as well as performance art and poetry. Ken Testi rightly described Eric’s as ‘a platform for popular culture’ in the 2009 book ‘Liverpool Eric’s – all the best clubs are downstairs, everybody knows that…’.  Read more…

From snowscapes to teapots – our new boards on Pinterest

18 December 2013 by Lisa

Painting of a snowy mountain scene beneath a dome.

‘An Alpine Biodome’, Geraint Evans. 2008.

The collections at the Walker Art Gallery are so vast and varied, it’s very difficult to pick out favourite items or paintings. But we’ve given it a go, so that we could bring to light some of the quirkier items from the collections on Pinterest.

We’ve been getting inspired by the winter/festive season and have put together two new Walker Art Gallery Pinterest boards filled with our collections,  for you to browse. Hopefully you’ll get inspired by them as well!  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Craig’s story

17 December 2013 by Kay

Craig Lundberg

Craig Lundberg

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our fourth and final instalment is Craig’s Lundberg’s story.

In 2007, Craig, a Lance Corporal with the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, led his men during a rooftop battle with insurgents in Basra. The 21 year-old was blinded by an exploding rocket-propelled grenade. After many months in hospital he recovered from his injuries but did not regain his sight. Read more…

Mandela: African necklace as act of defiance

16 December 2013 by Zachary

Beaded necklace

Nelson ‘Madiba’ Mandela, freedom fighter and former President of South Africa, was returned to his ancestral home of Qunu yesterday for a burial ceremony that was broadcast all over the world.

When Nelson Mandela appeared for sentencing in the South African Supreme Court on charges of treason in 1962, he wore a traditional Xhosa beaded costume as an expression of contempt and resistance against the illegitimate proceedings against him. This was captured in a famous picture by Eli Weinberg.

Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Caroline’s story

2 December 2013 by Kay

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Caroline’s story is our second instalment.

Caroline France (or Carol, as she liked to be known), was born in 1905 in Edge Hill; the eldest of 13 children. From the age of 13 she attended the School for the Blind Children’s Branch in Wavertree.

Aged 16, she went to the Hardman Street School, where she taught machine knitting, basket making and chair caning until 1957.

Carol dressed stylishly, enjoyed holidays and outings with her many friends, sang with church choirs and choral societies, and most of all loved her dogs. Read more…

Happy Durga Puja!

10 October 2013 by Louise

Picture of the hindu idols Mother Durga and Mahishasura

Mother Durga and the demon Mahishasura

Earlier this week, three Hindu idols which are traditionally used in the festival’s celebrations, were put on display in the atrium at the Museum, coinciding nicely with the beginning of Durga Puja. The idols were donated to us from the Bengali Association of Merseyside, who use statues like this every year during Durga Puja. Read more…