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Posts tagged with 'collections'

Discovering new artists at the Edinburgh Art Festival

28 August 2015 by Charlotte

Work by Nathan Anthony.

Work by Nathan Anthony.

I recently had the opportunity to visit Edinburgh Art Festival for the first time during a research trip connected to the Art Fund New Collecting Award the Walker Art Gallery recently received.  The Gallery has been awarded £60,000 by the Art Fund to expand its collection of works representing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) themes.  Read more…

Bread – Home to Roost

24 August 2015 by Kay

Ceramic chicken

If you watched the TV programme, Bread in the 1980s and early 90s, this hen ceramic egg holder may seem familiar.

Whilst it isn’t the exact same hen which graced the Boswell family’s kitchen table, into which the family put their financial contributions in the opening credits of each episode, this special hen was presented to local actress Katy Carmichael after filming the final episode of Bread in November 1991. Katy, who starred as Connie – Billy Boswell’s girlfriend in Season 7 – was given the hen as a memento and thank you by the Liverpool-born writer of Bread, Carla Lane. Read more…

VJ Day remembered in Liverpool

14 August 2015 by Sam

man in uniform

Philip Hayden

Karen O’Rourke, Curator of Urban and Military History at the Museum of Liverpool, writes:

“This week I was asked to supply some extracts for a service at Liverpool Parish Church, Our Lady and St Nicholas, happening tomorrow, Saturday 15 August, at 11am. The service is to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Victory over Japan Day (VJ Day). The anniversary will see services and events happening across Britain commemorating Japan’s surrender in the Second World War. The surrender effectively ended the War and allowed British soldiers to begin to return home.

The extracts that I supplied are from some of our journals relating to King’s Regiment men who served in the Far Eastern region in the Second World War. Two battalions of the King’s Regiment served in Burma as part of the Chindit expeditions behind Japanese lines.  Read more…

Freemasons’ jewels – a puzzling collection

13 August 2015 by Dave M

A man in Masonic regalia

Detail of the ‘Lord Leverhulme’ painting by George Hall Neale.

Having always been a fan of puzzles I was pleasantly surprised to discover one recently amongst our Masonic collections. Whilst in the process of tidying up data and photographing the large collection of items in the Lady Lever Art Gallery, I came across a crate containing dozens of small empty jewellers’ boxes.  Read more…

Liverpool’s Hispanic community – get involved

3 August 2015 by Kay

Chinese costume and fans in museum display

The de Larrinaga family display in the Global City gallery

Liverpool’s many global connections are celebrated across the Museum of Liverpool; including the city’s Hispanic communities. 19th century Liverpool was home to thriving Spanish, Basque, Galician, Filipino and Latin American communities who lived and worked in the maritime and trade networks connecting Liverpool with its sister ports in the Luso-Hispanic world.

In the Global City gallery you can see personal items relating to the de Larrinaga family – a successful Basque shipping family in Liverpool. From the 1860s the Larrinaga Steamship Company made regular journeys to the Philippines, stopping off in the great trading ports of Hong Kong and Singapore. The Larrinaga’s bought silks, lacquer boxes and Chinese-style furniture for their grand Liverpool homes. There is also a painting of one of the Larrinaga line ships – Anselma de Larrinaga on display.

In The People’s Republic gallery there is a ledger from a Basque Boarding House at 41 Hurst Street which records the names and destinations of dozens of Basque migrants who passed through Hurst Street on their way to the New World. Read more…

A wee tale from the ‘poop’ deck

21 July 2015 by Jen

Cropped for blog resized

Box of Bromo toilet paper. Accession number 1986.210.194

Part of my job as an Assistant Curator that I’ve absolutely loved is working in the museum stores with our fantastic collections. Sometimes though, due to the vast size of these collections, we come across some rather unexpected items. Such as toilet paper…

This item dates from the late 19th or early 20th century and was a popular brand in its day. The paper inside the box is in individual sheets, rather than the rolls we’re now familiar with, and its texture is not dissimilar to that of a paperback novel… despite it’s claims to being ‘soft and strong’ I suspect most of us would be reluctant to give it a home in our bathrooms today!

So why does the Maritime Museum have this absorbing item? Had collecting standards gone down the pan? Should we be flushed with embarrassment at this seemingly non-maritime object sneaking into our collections?  Read more…

Walker displays rare Picasso drawing for the first time

13 July 2015 by Felicity

Image of the drawing, Study for Temptation of St Anthony (1909), by Pablo Picasso

Study for Temptation of St Anthony (1909), by Pablo Picasso

We’re thrilled to have acquired a drawing by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, which will go on public display for the very first time from 14 July – 31 October 2015.

The drawing, Study for Temptation of St Anthony (1909), will be on show as part of a new display ‘Picasso on Paper‘ at the Walker Art Gallery.

Formerly owned by the great British painter and collector Lucian Freud (1922-2011), the drawing was gifted to National Museums Liverpool by Arts Council England as part of the Acceptance in Lieu scheme. Read more…

Cunard 175: The ship that started it all

3 July 2015 by Jen

Model of PS Britannia

Model of PS Britannia. Accession number 33.97

If you’ve been in Liverpool over the last couple of months it will have been hard to miss the city’s excitement. Cunard, one of the world’s most famous shipping lines, is celebrating their 175th anniversary right here in their home city and, like everything Cunard does, they’re doing it in style. The Three Queens (Queen Victoria, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary 2) made their magnificent entry to the city on 25 May, but Cunard’s beginnings 175 years ago were on a slightly smaller scale. Read more…

Time capsule discovery – a glimpse of Liverpool life, 1856

29 June 2015 by Kay

Get a glimpse of Liverpool’s history with this time capsule, which was recently acquired by the museum and is on display until 27 July 2015 as part of the Festival of Archaeology.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

This intriguing time capsule was recently unearthed by builder John Connell during renovation work at the ‘Scandinavian Hotel’ on the corner of Nelson Street in the city centre. Developer, Downing converted the building into student accommodation, The Arch, after it lay derelict for many years.

The building was originally constructed as a workshop, warehouse and showroom for Abbott’s Cabinet Makers. The foundation stone, embedded with the time capsule, was laid on Tuesday 9 December, 1856 by the owner Samuel Abbott Esquire. Several members of the Abbott family, along with Henry Summers, Architect and Jones and Co., builders were also present.  Read more…

Plant models collection now online

25 June 2015 by Lynn

Here, Curator of Botany, Donna Young reveals a fascinating part of our botanical collection, Brendel’s anatomical plant models and how they were used as teaching aides.

A dismantled oat model

“Down in the basement of World Museum there is a room with cabinets lining the walls. Inside these cabinets are an amazing collection of large and very colourful plant models. You may have seen some of them displayed in our atrium or in our Clore Natural History Centre.  Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.