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Happy birthday Edmund Gardner!

9 July 2013 by Rebecca

Edmund Gardner pilot ship

Today marks 60 years to the day since the former pilot ship Edmund Gardner was launched. For 28 years the Edmund Gardner was used as base at sea for Liverpool pilots, who would be transferred from the Edmund Gardner to inbound ships to guide them into Liverpool, or off ships they had guided out of the port. Read more…

Dickens’s model daughter

9 April 2013 by Sam

painting of a man in uniform comforting a woman

‘The Black Brunswickers’ by Millais

So you’ve heard of the author Charles Dickens – of course! But did you know that there is another famous member of the Dickens family? Charles’s daughter Kate was the model for the well known painting ‘The Black Brunswickers’ at the Lady Lever Art Gallery.

The painting depicts an imaginary scene in which a woman says goodbye to a soldier as he leaves for battle. It’s a painting full of emotion, the woman seems to be holding the door closed to stop her man from going. Or was she secretly looking forward to some ‘me time’ after he left so that she could settle down to read the latest Dickens novel…
Read more…

Chinese New Year!

8 February 2013 by Lucy

Most of us have already celebrated the New Year, and enough time has passed that we have made – and broken – New Year’s resolutions a plenty!

If like me you’ve taken a while to get started with your plans to start a new fitness regime or take up a new hobby, why not have another crack at starting a fresh this Sunday, with the dawning of the Chinese New Year.

2013 is the Year of the Snake, and World Museum can certainly boast a lot of snakes in its collections. You can visit the Clore Natural History Centre to see some of the snake specimens and skeletons on display, or have a look at our online collection if you really want to have a good nose at what’s in our stores. Read more…

Maternity chic from the 1920s

4 January 2013 by Lisa

Here’s our Curator of Costume and Textiles, Pauline Rushton, to tell us about her favourite pieces of costume from our current display at the Walker Art Gallery, ‘Mrs Tinne’s Wardrobe’.


If you love vintage costume then you really should make a visit to our Craft and Design Gallery at the Walker, as you’ll have the chance to see some more of the clothes from the wardrobe of local doctor’s wife and well-known shopaholic Mrs Emily Tinne! Read more…

Liverpool Merchant’s Heritage Trail

30 August 2012 by Ann

Liverpool is a city steeped in  maritime history. But while you might expect to find tales of smuggler’s coves and bravery at sea in Merseyside Maritime Museum,  the city  itself can surprise you with  many stories of its seafaring and merchant links.

photograph of the rear exterior of sudley house showing the conservatory and rose garden

Sudley  House, former home of George Holt

I was  recently introduced to Helen Fowler from The Monro pub on Duke Street  and after a quick coffee and  a chat I discovered not only were The Monro hosting an installation for Liverpool Biennial , but it is also a building bursting with historic tales to tell . I found out about the steam ship which it is named after and its former owner Colonel John Bolton . He was the most wealthy Liverpool merchant of his generation  and  no doubt inspired George Holt who lived just across town at Sudley House in Mossley Hill.  Read more…

City Soldiers – The DePeyster Collection

13 June 2012 by Lucy

Introducing Jamie McFadden, who’s been helping us out in the Press Office this week, and researching a very interesting talk that’s coming up tomorrow at the Museum of Liverpool.


The King’s Regiment has been involved in conflicts and battles around the world since the 1700s. Over the years, members of the Regiment have collected ‘Trophies of War’ and the further back in time we go, the more extravagant these trophies become.

National Museums Liverpool has a long-term loan of collections from the King’s Regiment that are currently exhibited in the City Soldiers gallery at the Museum of Liverpool. Some of the items in the collection date back to conflicts hundreds of years ago between British and American forces in an attempt to protect British overseas colonies. Read more…

Reflecting on the Jubilee: West African Portrait Figures of Queen Victoria

1 June 2012 by Lisa

Did you know that we have quite a few regal objects at World Museum? We started thinking about our royalty-related artefacts this week in the run up to the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and we thought we’d share a couple of them with you.

Both these carvings are on display in the World Cultures gallery in the World Museum, so why not come along and see them this weekend as an alternative to all that bunting!

Here’s our Curator of African Collections, Zachary Kingdon to tell us more about them… Read more…

West African Donors to World Museum

19 April 2012 by Alison

Did you know that almost eighty Africans are known to have donated more than 500 objects to World Museum. Their donations helped to create one of the most important historical collections of African cultural artefacts in Britain.

A new display at World Museum shows photographic portraits of some of the West Africans who made donations to the museum between 1897 and 1916.

Most of them were taken by West African photographers. All the donors were friends or contacts of Arnold Ridyard, the steamship engineer who transported their gifts to Liverpool. Read more…

Mysteries of the Codex to be revealed

28 March 2012 by Alison

One of World Museum’s most prized objects, a rare Mexican deer skin book more than 800 years old, has been investigated by a team of Italian scientists to reveal its secrets.

As well as being the museum’s treasures it is also considered one of the world’s greatest treasures. The priceless object even took pride of place in the Royal Adademy’s ‘AZTECS’ exhibition in 2002.

The Codex Fejérvary-Mayer dates back to AD 1200-1521 and is an illustrated, painted book. Codices were written in pictograms, rather than words derived from an alphabet.  Histories, genealogies and tribute economies were recorded in the pages. They served both educational and ritual proposes and at the same time, they were objects of great cultural, literary and artistic value. Read more…

The Turner Brothers

21 March 2012 by Lucy

This is our second blog post in a series leading up to our World War One Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool this Saturday, 24 March. Today, we look at the story of the Turner Brothers, William and Fred.

Soldiers from the Liverpool Scottish Battalion

William and Fred Turner signed up as Officers to the Liverpool Scottish Battalion. William can be seen here on the far right.

Lieutenants William and Fred Turner were born in Ullet Road, Liverpool, to parents Jessie and William. Both attended the local Greenbank School, and went on to become successful sportsmen in cricket, rugby and football at Sedbergh School, Yorkshire before following in their father’s footsteps and joining the printing firm Turner & Dunnett, of which their father was Senior Partner.
The boys were among the first to ‘sign up’ and both joined the Liverpool Scottish Battalion as officers. Read more…

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