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Posts tagged with 'community'

‘Frontstage and backstage at the Magic Clock, Easter lunchtime 1969’

12 March 2018 by Kay

pub in a city street

The Magic Clock, Roe Street, 1968. Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office, Liverpool Libraries.

Dr Jo Stanley, creative historian, made a textile artwork of the interior of the Magic Clock pub, Roe Street, Liverpool, especially for our Tales from the city exhibition. Jo, originally from Crosby, was a barmaid at the pub, over Christmas 1968 and Easter 1969, in vacations from teacher training college.

The Magic Clock was popular with gay men. It was situated in Liverpool’s original ‘gay quarter’ around Queen Square. Read more…

A proposal with Pride!

2 March 2018 by Kay

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

We have recently added some fantastic new items to our community case in the Tales from the city exhibition. This case enables us to reveal LGBT+ stories not represented in the exhibition, which people contact us about and would like to share.

The items were very kindly loaned by Emma and Ann Miller-McCaffrey and tell the story of their relationship.  Read more…

The Pansy Project – OUTing the past

24 January 2018 by Kay

two men at a flower bed, one in police uniform

Paul Harfleet planting pansies in St John’s Gardens, Liverpool with a representative of Merseyside Police © Paul Harfleet

Our sixth blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Paul Harfleet.

Paul is an artist who plants pansies at the sites of homophobia, including here in Liverpool, as part of The Pansy Project.

He tells us more –

“I began The Pansy Project 13 years ago in Manchester, since then I have travelled the world planting pansies at the sites of homophobia; from London, Liverpool, Paris, Istanbul and New York. Each pansy is documented in its location and then added to my website. This anecdotal geography of homophobia creates a fascinating narrative through the experience of homophobia. Read more…

Liverpool Pride – The inside story

17 January 2018 by Kay

Mayor leading crowds at the Liverpool Pride march

Liverpool Pride 2010 © Jeb Smith

Our fourth blog post instalment for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February 2018, is from Joan Burnett.

Joan, a trustee of Liverpool Pride, will be presenting ‘Liverpool Pride: A Local Protest, An International Message’.

She tells us more –

“My talk shows the development of Liverpool Pride from a protest from grass roots reaction to a local hate crime, to a large scale public event that has become part of a city’s cultural calendar and which has consistently uses Liverpool’s status as an internationally renowned city to raise awareness of LGBT+ human rights.”

Read more…

Same-sex desire and National Service – OUTing the Past

10 January 2018 by Kay

two men in army uniform, sat together on a bed

National Servicemen in the Army: R D Clarke, a national service recruit cleaning his boots at the Royal Army Ordnance Depot at Blackdown, Aldershot. © Imperial War Museum

Our second blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, here at the Museum of Liverpool, 3 February, is from Dr Emma Vickers.

Emma, who is senior lecturer in History at Liverpool John Moores University, will be examining the relationship between same-sex desire and National Service in post-war Britain.

She tells us more –

“My paper will explore attitudes towards same-sex desire in the context of the indiscriminate recruitment of young men and a dwindling supply of regular personnel. It will also consider the wider significance of the discussions that officials were engaged in for what they tell us about post-war Britain and understandings of same-sex desire”.

The full programme for the day can be seen here.

Read more…

Galkoff’s tiles saved!

6 December 2017 by Liz

Shop front

The gorgeous green Galkoff tiles were added in 1933.

If you’re travelling in to Liverpool via London Road, you might spot some activity around the old Galkoff’s Kosher butcher’s shop. As part of the Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project the beautiful green tiles from the building are being carefully removed by professional conservators, and will be cleaned and consolidated. Bringing the tiles indoors will ensure their long-term survival. Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) now own the building, and are working with the Museum of Liverpool to preserve the tiles. LSTM are giving the tiles to the museum for their preservation in public ownership in the collections of National Museums Liverpool. The tiles will be mounted and displayed in the Museum of Liverpool from late 2018 for a minimum of five years. Read more…

House of Memories’ 5th birthday!

21 September 2017 by Emma Riley

Last week we celebrated House of Memories’ 5th birthday!

We’re delighted that our dementia awareness programme has been running for over five years. During this time we’ve trained over 11,500 paid and family carers across the UK to help people to live well with dementia.

To celebrate we held a birthday party at the Museum of Liverpool – a special celebration afternoon for carers who have taken part in House of Memories, and their VIPS (the people they care for living with dementia). Read more…

Five House of Memories activities for World Alzheimer’s Month

4 September 2017 by Emma Riley

Memory walkSeptember 2017 is World Alzheimer’s Month, a campaign every September to raise awareness and challenge the stigma that surrounds dementia.

Here at National Museums Liverpool our House of Memories dementia awareness programme enables carers, family and friends to provide person-centred support for people living with dementia.

To mark World Alzheimer’s Month we’ve complied five House of Memories activities to do with a loved one during September and all year round. Read more…

Mapping the past

9 June 2017 by Mitty

Photo from the early 1960s, Alvin with his siblings. Alvin is on the right.

Photo from the early 1960s, Alvin with his siblings. Alvin is on the right.

As part of the Sankofa project we’ve been thinking about the idea of mapping Black heritage in the city. Liverpool 8 is not the only place the Black communities have settled in the city but it has been long considered the most multi-cultural area of Liverpool. I was delighted to see Alvin Christie’s interactive Toxteth map which links old photos and some almost forgotten places. Alvin, who was born and grew up in Selborne Street, tells us why he decided to make this map:

“Growing up in Toxteth, it has always been deeply embedded in my psyche just how cosmopolitan and varied the local community was. With its abundance of characters and diverse ethnic mix, the south end of the city in the 1950s and 60s made for an energetic mixture of lifestyles.

Read more…

“It’s good to know you are not alone” – free dementia awareness workshop for family carers

1 June 2017 by Emma Riley

At National Museums Liverpool we’re delighted to be able to offer another free half-day dementia awareness workshop for family carers, taking place on 20 June at the Museum of Liverpool.

House of Memories is National Museums Liverpool’s award-winning dementia awareness training programme, providing both professionals and family carers with practical skills and resources to support people to live well with dementia. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.