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Posts tagged with 'conservation'

Making cutters for the Oceanic 2 ship model

7 November 2013 by Sam

model rowing boats and oars

The conserved pieces of the tiny model cutters, with a scale in centimetres to give an idea of the size

Ship and historic models conservator David Parsons has been restoring the model of Oceanic 2, which we’re hoping to display at Merseyside Maritime Museum as part of plans to mark the First World War. Following on from his previous blog post, here is his latest update on progress:

“I’m still working on the final parts of Oceanic 2 and the parts I’ve just completed were probably the most enjoyable things I’ve done on the whole model, partly because of what they are and also because they are made up of so many different parts.  These were two ‘cutters’: rowing boats to be used by the ship’s crew. Read more…

Well done James and George!

31 October 2013 by Rebecca

Two volunteers stand next to life boat and Edmund Gardner pilot boat in the background

James and George.

Ben Whittaker, Curator of Port History, has some exciting news to share:-

“Congratulations to two of our longstanding volunteers on the Edmund Gardner Pilot ship, who have been honoured with national awards. James Dulson and George Collinson were awarded the prestigious Marsh Volunteer award which recognises outstanding volunteers in the conservation of historic vessels in the UK. George attended the awards ceremony on HMS Belfast in London which was presented by TV personality Julia Bradbury. Read more…

Walker paintings go on loan to Verona

31 October 2013 by Sam

crane lifting a crate through an upstairs window

A crane carefully lifts the crate containing our Poussin painting into an upper floor of the Palazzo

Sharp eyed visitors to the Walker Art Gallery may have spotted that two paintings by Poussin and Turner are not currently on display, and may be wondering where they are. With Shakespearean flair, our Senior Paintings Conservator David Crombie has pointed out that a more apt question would be “Wherefore art thou, Poussin?” – I’ll let him explain why:

“Two major works from the Walker Art Gallery were recently sent on loan to an exhibition in Verona, Italy.  Nicholas Poussin’s Landscape with the Ashes of Phocion’ and Turner’s ‘Landscape with River and Distant Mountains’ are part of Around Monet: the Landscape from the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Century currently showing at the Palazzo della Gran Guardia in the city until February 2014. Read more…

Replacing model gratings – a delicate operation

17 September 2013 by Sam

detail of ship model deck with missing part

Detail of hatchway, showing the missing grating.

Ship and historic models conservator David Parsons has news of a very delicate piece  of conservation work that he has been working on:

“Oceanic 2 was built for the White Star Line by Harland & Wolff in 1899, it was commissioned as a merchant-cruiser in the First World War but sank soon after.

I’ve been working on the conservation of the builder’s model of Oceanic 2 for some time now and I’m getting towards finishing it. One of the early decisions I made was to leave the most complicated parts until last, and one of the most complicated things was replacing missing gratings.

Read more…

A delicate operation

16 July 2013 by Angela

The Amber Cabinet

Here is a post from Tracey Seddon, Head of Organics Conservation:

“I was relieved last week to get the fabulous Amber Cabinet back on display where it belongs in the Walker Art Gallery. I had reluctantly and rather hastily taken the decision to remove it from display back in 2011 when rumblings caused by the demolition of the Central Library next door had lead to some small fragments falling off. I was very concerned about the prospect of more damage. Read more…

‘Leader’, our first ship model

11 July 2013 by Sam

large sailing ship model

Chris Moseley, Head of Ship and Historic Models Conservation, reports on a historic ship model that was recently conserved ready for a new display that opened this week:

“The ‘Leader’ was the very first ship model presented to National Museums Liverpool’s collections in 1862. It has gone on display this week in the Art and the Sea gallery in Merseyside Maritime Museum, as part of a small display about the Liverpool pilots, marking the 60th anniversary of the launch of the Edmund Gardner pilot ship.

Read more…

Digging in the storerooms

10 July 2013 by Ashley Cooke

Detail of the papyrus showing Amenkhau standing up and holding his hands up in adoration before before the falcon-headed god Ra-Horakhty seated on a throne.

Amenkhau holding his hands up in adoration before before the falcon-headed god Ra-Horakhty seated on a throne.

It’s been over two years since my last fieldwork in Egypt but with a collection of over 16,000 items from ancient Egypt there’s always some digging to be done in the museum storerooms! I was recently digitising all of our Greek papyri from Egypt for Dr Nikolaos Gonis, a papyrologist at University College London. It turns out we have a lot of interesting material from the 5th-6th centuries AD and Nikolaos is going to publish them all as a book. Read more…

Liberty scarf from the QE2

2 July 2013 by Sam

square headscarf with illustrations of glamorous liners, passengers and locations

Scarf, accession number MMM.2007.24

Here’s a sneaky preview of a new display at Merseyside Maritime Museum, from Head of Organics Conservation, Tracey Seddon:

“As we have no textile conservators I get to do sewing again this week.  Last week was a 500 year old tapestry.  This week I had a rather chic silk scarf from the 1970s.

The scarf was a souvenir from the glamorous QE2 liner. It was designed by the London fashion house, Liberty, with a print featuring Art Deco style images of planes, liners and beaches occupied by beautiful people generally having a fabulous time.   Read more…

Triumph of Fortitude

27 June 2013 by Angela

Triumph of Fortitude being rehung

Here’s an update from Tracey Seddon, Head of Organics Conservation:

“This is my first blog for a good while so I should introduce myself. I am Tracey Seddon, Head of Organics Conservation for National Museums Liverpool.  What does that mean, I hear you ask? Well, basically I look after the museums’ objects; specifically those made from organic materials like wood, basketry, fur, feathers, horn,  ivory and bone (I know! those latter two are only a tiny bit organic).  Other specialist colleagues deal with specific categories of material like paintings, furniture and sculpture. Read more…

By royal appointment

21 May 2013 by Angela

Bust of Grand Prince Ferdinando De’ Medici

Here’s our Head of Sculpture Conservation Lottie Barnden with news of an object going on a very special journey:

“Sculpture Conservation has recently taken delivery of a bust from the Lady Lever Art Gallery. It depicts Ferdinando De’ Medici by Giovachino Fortini, you can find out more about it on our collection pages.

The Uffizi Gallery in Florence is marking the 300th anniversary of the death of the Grand Prince Ferdinando De’ Medici and has requested the loan of our magnificent bust to be included in this exhibition. The Grand Prince was a great patron of the arts in the late 17th and early 18th centuries and this bust will be displayed among some of the works of art he collected. Read more…

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