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Posts tagged with 'docks'

Flying the flag for Seafarers Awareness Week

23 June 2014 by Sam

logo with text: An island nation, Seafarers Awareness Week 21-29 June 2014

Ben Whittaker, curator of port history at Merseyside Maritime Museum, explains why Seafarers Awareness Week is important, and how we can all get involved:

“Are you reading this blog on a computer, smartphone or tablet? Chances are it was brought to this country in a metal box on the back of a ship, along with your TV, clothes and most of your other possessions. Read more…

New tours of the Old Dock

7 January 2013 by Sam

woman in 18th century costume standing in an underground cavern with old brick sides

Starting today, tours of Liverpool’s historic Old Dock are available every day of the week. Led by staff from Merseyside Maritime Museum, the tours take you below the city’s streets to see the liver-coloured natural sandstone pool which gave Liverpool its name and find out all about the creation of the docks. Tours are free but must be booked in advance – find out how to book on the Old Dock page on the website.

As if that wasn’t exciting enough, Jon Marrow, senior education officer at Merseyside Maritime Museum, has details of special role play performances which will be available for a limited period only in March: Read more…

Book sale bargains

3 January 2013 by Karen

A brightly coloured teaset

A divine Clarice Cliff ‘tea for two’ set from Age of Jazz.

As January is synonymous with sales and spring cleaning we thought we’d kill two birds with one stone and have a bit of a clear out in our book warehouse. So if you fancy bagging yourself a bargain then check out the offers on our online shop.

It’s an eclectic selection and there are some great books, my personal favourites being ‘When Time Began to Rant and Rage…’ which is a fab book of Irish figurative work and totally worth a fiver, Age of Jazz: British Arts Deco Ceramics as I’m a sucker for a deco teaset, and British Watercolours and Drawings from the Lady Lever’s collection.

If you’ve still not got a John Moores catalogue then now is the time to buy one as they’re reduced to £7.50. And if you buy it from the Walker shop you get the John Moores China version for free. Read more…

Remembering SS Ceramic – lost 70-years-ago today

6 December 2012 by Dickie

photo of a ship

Liverpool liner SS Ceramic sunk on 6 December 1942.

At first families back home in Liverpool were oblivious to the horror that had befallen their loved ones.

On November 23 1942 my grandmother watched from Crosby beach as Liverpool liner SS Ceramic left the River Mersey. Her husband Fred was aboard working as a steward. Clutching her three-month-old baby, Annie Felton waved the ship off, unaware that this would be the very final farewell.
 
The 18,400 ton Ceramic was launched in 1912 by Harland and Wolff in Belfast. She was the first ship built by White Star Line after Titanic and spent her years sailing the Liverpool to Australia route. Read more…

Get snappy!

23 May 2011 by Lucy

Photographer Mark McNulty has been sending us some photos of the new Museum of Liverpool, from angles we haven’t seen before.

He was able to get this shot of the Museum and two of National Museums Liverpool’s historic ships in dry dock: the three-masted schooner De Wadden, and the pilot boat Edmund Gardner.

Photo of the Museum of Liverpool

Image taken by Liverpool photographer Mark McNulty of the Museum of Liverpool with De Wadden and Edmund Gardner historic ships. (c) Mark McNulty

Have you got any great pics of the Museum of Liverpool? If so, why not have a go at uploading them onto our flickr site? Read more…

Where has my father gone?

21 March 2011 by Lucy

Francesca Aiken, assistant exhibition curator for the Museum of Liverpool’s Global City Gallery writes:


David Yip

David Yip narrated ‘Where has my father gone?’ for East meets West – The Story of Shanghai and Liverpool. With special thanks to David Yip and Lisa O’Neil for providing these images.

“How could it happen? How could I not know about this?” was David Yip’s response when he heard for the first time about the enforced repatriation of hundreds of seamen from Liverpool’s Chinese community that took place in 1946.

For many of those directly affected, the wives and children of Chinese seamen who worked for the Merchant Navy during the Second World War, the truth about their sudden disappearance wasn’t known until decades later – many thought they had been abandoned. Now, 65 years later, more and more are discovering the truth. Read more…

Object Detectives

19 November 2010 by Eleanor

My name is Ellie and I am a new addition at the National Conservation Centre in Liverpool.  I am here on a year long internship in Objects Conservation and Public Engagement, funded by ICON (Institute of Conservation) and the Heritage Lottery Fund

While I am here I will post regular updates on the blog to provide a glimpse of what is happening behind-the-scenes at the National Conservation Centre, as conservators look after and investigate fascinating objects from the collection. Read more…

Wondrous Plaque

4 November 2010 by Lucy

Today, I went along to see Billy Fury’s statue, which is positioned next to the Piermaster’s House at the Albert Dock.

After over six years of fundraising by the Sound of Fury Fan Club, the statue – created by sculptor Tom Murphy – was revealed in April 2003. The unveiling at the old Museum of Liverpool Life was a fantastic occasion witnessed by the many involved in the project, and those who simply wanted to honour the memory of the rock ‘n’ roll legend. Read more…

War imports

25 October 2010 by stepheng

archive photo of men unloading cargo from a ship

Image courtesy of the Liverpool Daily Post & Echo

I have many memories of Liverpool’s docklands when they were labour-intensive before the widespread use of containers.

Once I was flung off my motorcycle when the wheels got caught in the dock railway lines. The windscreen and front mudguard were shattered.

As I wheeled my machine past the police officer he joked: “You crunched!” (This was a catch phrase from a crisps advert of the time, 1968.)

Some 25 years earlier the Port of Liverpool fought a daily battle of survival bringing in vital supplies. Read more…

Mapping Memory

19 August 2010 by Laura B

Last month the ‘Mapping Memory: L1 and Liverpool’s central waterfront’ project began with its first workshop, kindly attended by the Liverpool Women’s History Group. The aim of the project is to explore memories of the L1 area during the 1950s, 60s and 70s and the Women’s History Group certainly provided an abundance of lively and interesting memories and stories for our researchers to collect.

The workshop started by asking the ladies to trace a particular route they would take through the L1 and central waterfront area, revealing a clustering around places such as Lord Street, Paradise Street and London Road. As the session progressed an array of collective memories showed how women used urban space during the twentieth century and the areas of the city which have created the most powerful and resilient memories over the years. Read more…

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