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Posts tagged with 'ethnology'

Liverpool’s Tibet collection goes live!

15 March 2016 by Emma Martin

Meditation painting or thangka

Meditation painting or thangka sold to the museum in 1905 by Sergeant J Heaney on his return to Liverpool after participating in the Mission to Lhasa

It’s a little known fact that Liverpool has one of the world’s great Tibet collections. Liverpool doesn’t seem like the obvious choice for a Tibet collection; you might think of Liverpool’s maritime connections rather than it’s Himalayan ones. But 19th century missionaries, soldiers and explorers did sell or donate Tibetan objects to Liverpool having arrived in its port after a long journey from India. Read more…

Harris Jonas takes a look at our Japanese swords

11 March 2016 by Emma Martin

Harris (left) taking in the history of the blades with Mark (right).

Harris (left) taking in the history of the blades with Mark (right).

This week we had a visitor to the Japan collections. Ethnology volunteer Mark Jones tells us about it here.

“In a blog I wrote back in 2014, I discussed the different Japanese blades I’ve documented for World Museum’s Japan collection. This week I had the opportunity to meet Harris Jonas, a 6th Dan in karate and a senior instructor at the Liverpool Shotokan Karate Club (LSKC). Read more…

Black pitch, carved histories research project

7 March 2016 by Joanna Ostapkowicz

old photo of people digging along a high, steep bank of the lake

An early postcard showing the depths attained in digging pitch, and the manual labour involved. Even at these depths, the lake would refill to its original level within a day or two.

In 2015 I blogged from Trinidad and Tobago, where I was working on the AHRC-funded Pitch Lake project.

We are now entering the final phase of the project, and while work continues on various elements – from the last strontium analyses to the documentation of the replica commission – we’re taking this opportunity to launch the project web pages: Black pitch, carved histories: Prehistoric wood sculpture from Trinidad’s Pitch Lake.

The web pages document the aims, techniques and methodologies of the project, the artefacts studied and the wider context, Read more…

Objects from the voyages of Captain James Cook

24 November 2015 by Emma Martin

16677-RI 28.18Liverpool’s ethnology collections hold a small number of objects relating to the voyages of Captain James Cook (1728-1779). Cook made three voyages to the Pacific and Americas collecting both new knowledge, and also objects and specimens. Read more…

6 curious objects you never knew belonged to World Museum

8 September 2015 by Lisa

Echinodermata in jars

Spiky echinodermata from the World Museum’s zoology collections.

Devil’s guts and a unicorn horn? Find out about 6 curious objects you never knew were in the World Museum’s collections…

The collections at World Museum are vast. Really vast. There are 80,000 objects in the Antiquities collection alone. While searching through our online collections, I’ve discovered some very unusual objects: Read more…

Tobago: the final stop

27 August 2015 by Paula

The Tobago field collecting team: (left to right): David, Terri and Darren

The Tobago field collecting team: (left to right): David, Terri and Darren

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas, collection concludes her research journey through Trinidad & Tobago:

Day 9-10: Tobago

Tobago: the final stop in the herbarium/strontium collecting tour. Forestry officer Mr. Darren Henry picked me up early on the first day for a quick visit to the Forestry offices to discuss itinerary and best places to find the specific species we’re after, before venturing out to the ‘wilds’ of the island. Read more…

The central South West: ‘five-fingers’, ‘fat pork’ and tamarind sours

20 August 2015 by Paula

Waterloo temple

Waterloo temple

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas Collection, is on the last leg of her research trip to Trinidad before heading over to Tobago:

Day 7-8: The central South West: ‘five-fingers’, ‘fat pork’ and tamarind sours

Our last area was the central South West, one of the island’s more geologically complex regions, with both Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock.  This was among the oldest geology on the island, and generally, the older the geology, the higher the expected strontium isotope values.  We covered a large region over the course of two days, from Waterloo in the north to Moruga on the south coast, finishing off on the important archaeological site of Banwari Trace, home of ‘Banwari Woman’, thought to date to ca. 5000 BC, which would make her the oldest human skeleton known from the entire Caribbean. Read more…

The source: Pitch Lake and environs

11 August 2015 by Paula

Pitch Lake and a view of the shoreline from the centre of the lake during a downpour

A view of the shoreline from the centre of Pitch Lake before and after a downpour. The two photos were taken within moments of each other.

We continue with Joanna on her journey through Trinidad as she reaches Pitch Lake:

Days 5 & 6: The source: Pitch Lake and environs

Pitch Lake: the reason I’m in Trinidad. Our mission over the next two days is to collect samples both within and around the lake to give us a good strontium signal for this unique region. Of course the other Trinidad/Tobago regions are important too – but this is the core of our study. Read more…

The oilfields of the South East and ‘pitch lake’ roads

7 August 2015 by Paula

The southeast crew

The southeast crew: (left to right): Keisha, Leo, Imran, Jameel.

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas collection, continues her rather bumpy journey through Trinidad, we catch up with her for:

Day 4: The oilfields of the South East and ‘pitch lake’ roads

We were joined by forest officers Mr. Imran Mohammed and Mr. Leo Persad for our tour of the South East forest reserves.  This region holds some of the largest forested areas in Trinidad, including the Trinity Hills Wildlife Sanctuary. It also has oil reserves running throughout it, and there are many small oil pumps working away. Read more…

Mountains, Maracas beach and more mangos

4 August 2015 by Paula

A mountainous vantage point between Verdant Vale and Morne La Croix

A mountainous vantage point between Verdant Vale and Morne La Croix

It’s day 3 for Joanna Ostapkowicz on her research trip to Trinidad:

“Day 3: Mountains, Maracas beach and more mangos: the Central North West

The North West is Trinidad’s mountainous region, with steep roads heading out to the coasts. The roads cut through mountain rock, sometimes with only bamboo groves keeping the road from slipping down slope. It is here that we found some of the largest examples of our key species – such as this magnificent Andira sp. (Angelin), perched along the Marienne River. Read more…

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