Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'First World War'

Tragic story of First World War soldier’s suicide

7 February 2014 by Kay

2014-LOGO-31-150x150

February is Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Trans History Month. To help represent and celebrate the lives and achievements of Liverpool’s LGBT community we are highlighting this story of Private William Mason, a King’s Liverpool Regiment soldier who served in the First World War.

Aged just 19, William Mason committed suicide in July 1916. William, from Birkenhead, had enlisted the previous year in Liverpool. He is one of almost 80,000 soldiers listed on our Kings Regiment World War I database. The following information is taken from a Liverpool Echo article, Tuesday 18 July, 1916, featured on the database. Read more…

National Register of Archives

14 January 2014 by Sarah

Photograph of wounded disembarking from a hospital ship during the First World War

Photograph of wounded disembarking from a hospital ship during the First World War (Maritime Archives reference D/APB)

Here at the Maritime Archives & Library, I am in the process of preparing our annual return for the NRA, which in the world of UK Archives stands for National Register of Archives.  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Jack Brunel Cohen’s story

10 December 2013 by Kay

Jack Cohen

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our third instalment is Jack’s story.

Jack Brunel Cohen was born in 1886. He was the Jewish great-nephew of Liverpool department store owner David Lewis. Jack and two of his brothers fought with the 5th Battalion, King’s Regiment during the First World War. He was wounded in action at Ypres and had both of his legs amputated. Read more…

Lusitania families’ event

8 November 2013 by Ellie

RMS Lusitania at the Liverpool Landing Stage in 1907

MCR/25/117 Image courtesy of NML, image not copyright NML.

At this time of year we pause to remember the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

With that in mind, Merseyside Maritime Museum is continuing to work towards marking the centenary of the sinking of Liverpool’s most famous ship, ‘RMS Lusitania’, in 2015.

On the 7 May 1915, while en route to Liverpool, ‘Lusitania’ was torpedoed by the German U-boat U-20 off the Irish coast near the Old Head of Kinsale. She sank in just 18 minutes, and 1198 men, women and children perished. The sinking sent shockwaves around the world, but her loss was felt particularly keenly in Liverpool – where rioting broke out against German-owned businesses.  A large number of the crew had strong connections to the city and many families were devastated by the event. “Lusi”, as she was affectionately known in the city, was held high regard by local people and had been a familiar site at the Landing Stage since her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in September 1907.

Each year Merseyside Maritime Museum marks the anniversary with a commemoration around our ‘Lusitania’ propeller, on the quayside across from the museum. Many of those who join us have family connections to those who were on board, and this year we met with people after the event to listen to their stories.

Lusitania propeller on the museum quayside

MMM.1989.159

On Friday 15th November we are hosting a follow-up event, and are hoping to see some familiar faces but also make new connections with local people who have family ties to ‘Lusitania’. If you, or someone you know, would like to come along then head for Learning Base 2, on the second floor of the museum, from 2pm.

If you would like more information then please email us at Lusitania@liverpoolmuseums.org.uk.

Can you help us to fill an important gap in our First World War archives?

23 September 2013 by Felicity

We need your help in filling an important gap in our archives. Here’s Karen O’Rourke, Curator of Social History at Museum of Liverpool, to explain:

“Museum of Liverpool has a fabulous exhibition about Liverpool people in the First World War, but when I was putting together the exhibition, I realised that we didn’t have any material about the local Black and Minority Ethnic community. It concerned me that we were effectively missing a chunk of the local population and when I was given the opportunity to suggest potential First World War projects that could feature in Museum of Liverpool, it was my first choice! Read more…

International Mine Awareness Day

4 April 2012 by Sarah

Photograph of damaged side of a ship

Damaged hull of City of Exeter, Ellerman Lines (reference DX/1507)

It’s rather hard to make out, but this photograph shows a large hole in the Ellerman Line vessel City of Exeter caused when it was mined 200 miles off Bombay (Mumbai) in 1917.  The ship safely reached Bombay (Mumbai) and was put into dry dock for repairs.

Today is International Mine Awareness Day part of a campaign to highlight the danger to civilians from mines laid during wars.  The charity MAG (Mines Awareness Group) does a lot of work in this area, both in educating children to recognise and avoid mines and in clearing land so it can be safely used again. Read more…

Captain Noel Chavasse VC & Bar, MC (1884 – 1917)

23 March 2012 by Lucy

Tomorrow, is our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool, and you may know that we have been blogging all week about WWI soldiers from the city. Today, we’re featuring Captain Noel Chavasse, who was the only soldier in WWI to receive the honour of the Victoria Cross twice.

Photograph of Captain Noel Chavasse

Captain Noel Chavasse won the Victoria Cross twice

The son of the Bishop of Liverpool, Noel was twice awarded the Victoria Cross (VC) and was the most highly decorated British serviceman in the First World War. Read more…

Captain Frank Watson

22 March 2012 by Lucy

Today, we’re looking at the story of Captain Frank Watson, in the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday.

Photograph of Frank Watson

Frank Watson originally signed up to the 17th Pals Battalion in Liverpool.

Lord Derby came up with the idea of bringing together men who worked and socialised in a fighting regiment to appeal to more men to ‘sign up’.

The response to the first adverts was so great, that Lord Derby was able to form two battalions, and by mid-October a second advertisement appealing for recruits meant that there were a total of four ‘Liverpool Pals’ battalions, and two reserve battalions. They were officially known as the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Service Battalions of the King’s Regiment, Liverpool. Read more…

The Turner Brothers

21 March 2012 by Lucy

This is our second blog post in a series leading up to our World War One Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool this Saturday, 24 March. Today, we look at the story of the Turner Brothers, William and Fred.

Soldiers from the Liverpool Scottish Battalion

William and Fred Turner signed up as Officers to the Liverpool Scottish Battalion. William can be seen here on the far right.

Lieutenants William and Fred Turner were born in Ullet Road, Liverpool, to parents Jessie and William. Both attended the local Greenbank School, and went on to become successful sportsmen in cricket, rugby and football at Sedbergh School, Yorkshire before following in their father’s footsteps and joining the printing firm Turner & Dunnett, of which their father was Senior Partner.
The boys were among the first to ‘sign up’ and both joined the Liverpool Scottish Battalion as officers. Read more…

David Jones – Victoria Cross Hero

20 March 2012 by Lucy

Image of David Jones, VC

David Jones was awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding bravery

In the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday, we’ll be sharing a few stories from our collection about soldiers who fought in World War I.

Today’s story is about David Jones, VC.

David Jones, from Smithdown Lane in Edge Hill, enlisted in 1915 and was soon promoted to Sergeant.

Read more…