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Posts tagged with 'first world war'

Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps

8 March 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

Poster

‘Women Urgently Wanted’ © IWM (Art.IWM PST 13171)

As soon as war had been declared in August 1914, women had begun ‘doing their bit’ towards the war effort. Initially they worked as nurses, shop staff or office clerks, but as the war progressed, women took on roles that were traditionally more masculine, such as tram conductors, farm labourers and munitions workers. Read more…

Caught by the Wolf: remembering the SS Matheran

26 January 2017 by Ben

men on the deck of a ship

Prisoners on the deck of SMS Wolf. © IWM (Q 53085)

In today’s Times newspaper, there is a small but poignant notice:

“BOY ABDUL, Indian Merchant Service. Sole casualty, SS Matheran, Brocklebank Line, Liverpool, Captain Maurice Addy. Sunk by a mine off Cape Town, SA, 26 January 1917. Remembered today on the Seamen’s Memorial in Mumbai and by his Captain’s family.”

100 years ago today, the Liverpool ship SS Matheran was sunk by a mine laid by one of Germany’s most notorious ships – the SMS Wolf.  Read more…

Centenary of the sinking of White Star Line’s Laurentic

25 January 2017 by Ellie

Laurentic at Belfast

MCR/82/167 Copyright unknown, believed to be expired

As we continue to mark the centenary of the First World War, I wanted to highlight a Liverpool ship that was lost on 25 January 1917.

Laurentic (originally named Alberta) was built in Belfast by Harland & Wolff in 1908 for the Dominion Line. During construction, Alberta and her sister ship Albany were purchased by White Star Line and were renamed Laurentic and Megantic.  Laurentic departed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Canada in 1909, and over the next few years carried thousands of passengers across the Atlantic. Read more…

Worse things happen at sea

19 December 2016 by Ellie

man at the Liverpool waterfront

Eugene McLaughlin in Liverpool

Today marks a First World War anniversary that many of us will not have heard about before. Our guest blogger Eugene McLaughlin explains why he is visiting Merseyside Maritime Museum today to remember his grandfather’s fateful voyage 100 years ago.

“My grandfather died when I was a baby.  I knew very little about him.  I knew he was from Sligo, he was a sailor and he was once Captain of the Galway Bay tender SS Dun Aengus.  I recall childhood tales that he was the Captain of a ship that was torpedoed during “the” war, which I assumed to be the Second World War.  My grandmother had given me two of his brass buttons from his time at sea.  Other than that, nothing.

So, when my wife gave me a Christmas present of a subscription to an ancestry research website, I had to investigate.  Read more…

Remembering Britannic – Titanic’s sister ship

21 November 2016 by Ellie

Postcard of HMHS Britannic

DX/2108/4/3

Today marks the centenary of the sinking of White Star Line’s Britannic.

Built at Harland and Wolff’s shipyard in Belfast, she was the third of the Olympic-class passenger liners – sister ship to Olympic and Titanic.

Read more…

Somme centenary: the Battle of Ancre

16 November 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

Map

Map of the Battle of Ancre. The red lines indicate the trenches, with the thicker lines showing the British and German front lines on 13 November.

Since 1 July, I have been blogging about some of the significant attacks in the Battle of the Somme involving the King’s Liverpool Regiment. This is the final one of the series. Read more…

Somme centenary tweets

11 November 2016 by Laura

Tweet

Our daily tweets included the name, rank, age and when possible, an image of a soldier who had died that day

Every day since the 1 July we have been tweeting to remember the soldiers from the King’s Liverpool Regiment who fought at the Battle of the Somme. Now as we enter the final few days of the Battle’s 100th anniversary we’re bringing our daily tweets to an end. Read more…

Somme centenary: the Battle of Le Transloy

18 October 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

portrait photo of a soldier in uniform

Victoria Cross Winner David Jones was killed on 7 October 1916, before he could receive his award.

The Battle for Guillemont stalled the left flank of the British Army for six weeks in the summer of 1916. September saw a renewed push forward and by the end of the month, the Allies controlled the ground as far as Les Boefs and Gueudecourt.

The War led to tactical and technological advances on both sides and German commanders employed a new tactic, deploying machine guns using existing terrain as cover rather than fixed within their trench system. This strategy enabled them to hold ground with their already depleted forces. As the Allies advanced towards the ridge at Le Transloy, they would soon find out how effective this tactic would be.  Read more…

Somme centenary: the final attack on Guillemont

2 September 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

barren landscape with bare tree trunks stripped of branches and leaves

Guillemont after the September 1916 Somme battles

On 3 September 1916, after four unsuccessful attacks on the village of Guillemont, the British Army, as part of a wider push, launched another assault. Once again, men from the King’s Regiment were involved, this time from the 12th Battalion.

The Battalion had been in and out of the trenches to the west of the village from mid August and had already experienced some casualties. On 3 September, at 12 noon, the Battalion went ‘over the top’ to capture Guillemont. They moved through Trones Wood and across the exposed flat land to the west of the village. Read more…

Somme centenary: the battle for Guillemont continues

9 August 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

rows of gravestones in a cemetary in the French countryside

Guillemont Road Cemetery, where many King’s Regiment soldiers are buried

As night fell on 8 August 1916, a few of the men from the 1st Battalion had escaped the attack and found their way back to the British Front Line. Of the hundreds of men in the battalion, who had gone over the top that morning, only 180 were available to answer their names at roll call. The battle for the village of Guillemont described in yesterday’s blog continued however, as the remaining men of the 8th (Irish) Battalion were still trapped in the village. Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.