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Posts tagged with 'First World War'

Captain Frank Watson

22 March 2012 by Lucy

Today, we’re looking at the story of Captain Frank Watson, in the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday.

Photograph of Frank Watson

Frank Watson originally signed up to the 17th Pals Battalion in Liverpool.

Lord Derby came up with the idea of bringing together men who worked and socialised in a fighting regiment to appeal to more men to ‘sign up’.

The response to the first adverts was so great, that Lord Derby was able to form two battalions, and by mid-October a second advertisement appealing for recruits meant that there were a total of four ‘Liverpool Pals’ battalions, and two reserve battalions. They were officially known as the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Service Battalions of the King’s Regiment, Liverpool. Read more…

The Turner Brothers

21 March 2012 by Lucy

This is our second blog post in a series leading up to our World War One Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool this Saturday, 24 March. Today, we look at the story of the Turner Brothers, William and Fred.

Soldiers from the Liverpool Scottish Battalion

William and Fred Turner signed up as Officers to the Liverpool Scottish Battalion. William can be seen here on the far right.

Lieutenants William and Fred Turner were born in Ullet Road, Liverpool, to parents Jessie and William. Both attended the local Greenbank School, and went on to become successful sportsmen in cricket, rugby and football at Sedbergh School, Yorkshire before following in their father’s footsteps and joining the printing firm Turner & Dunnett, of which their father was Senior Partner.
The boys were among the first to ‘sign up’ and both joined the Liverpool Scottish Battalion as officers. Read more…

David Jones – Victoria Cross Hero

20 March 2012 by Lucy

Image of David Jones, VC

David Jones was awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding bravery

In the run up to our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday, we’ll be sharing a few stories from our collection about soldiers who fought in World War I.

Today’s story is about David Jones, VC.

David Jones, from Smithdown Lane in Edge Hill, enlisted in 1915 and was soon promoted to Sergeant.

Read more…

A Day to Remember

20 March 2012 by Lucy

Boy trying on helmet

(c) Mark McNulty. The City Soldier’s gallery features collections from The King’s Regiment, and a range of helmets to try on.

This Saturday, 24 March, the Museum of Liverpool will be hosting a free First World War family history event to help people with their search into relatives who served in the war.

The Museum looks after the collections of The King’s Regiment in the City Soldiers gallery, which focuses on the long history of the regiment and its relationship with Liverpool. Created in 1685, The King’s Regiment is one of Britain’s oldest regiments. It has been Liverpool’s regiment since 1881, and is now amalgamated into the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment.  Read more…

Maritime Tales – Ships’ Galleys

28 April 2011 by stepheng

Photo of ship's galley

Imaghe courtesy of Liverpool Daily Post & Echo

I enjoy reading menus, particularly those from years ago and meals I have enjoyed in the past.

I attended many formal lunches and dinners with members of the Royal family during my years as a news reporter. I remember after one of them Princess Diana announced she had given up alcohol.

At another everybody – including Princess Margaret – was served identical steaks. Did they all come from the same tin? We didn’t care as we were then entertained by Larry Grayson, Frankie Vaughanand Harry Worth. Read more…

Maritime Tales – Johnston’s Beef

28 March 2011 by stepheng

Ship model image

Image courtesy of Liverpool Daily Post & Echo

I used to watch a lot of cowboy films and was amused when a cowpoke would offer refreshments out on the range.

“We got coffee and beans,” was always said with the relish more associated with the announcement of a huge feast.

I suppose it was all they could carry in their saddle bags but what about beef – dried, corned or salted? They were literally up to their withers in it. Read more…

Convoy HX 219

8 March 2011 by stepheng

Small model ships

Image courtesy of Liverpool Daily Post and Echo

I would not like to be a pirate – apart from being illegal, the chances of meeting a violent end are too great– but I do like the swashbuckling aspects.

The sight of the Jolly Roger (the pirate skull and crossbones) being raised is pretty exciting – it is a part of pirate lore which has been adapted by submariners. 

A British commander first flew the notorious flag in modern times nearly 100 years ago. Read more…

Lusitania losses

29 November 2010 by stepheng

napkin with image of a ship and text

Image courtesy of the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo.

I find the words on the napkin, produced to commemorate one of the worst maritime disasters of the First World War, very moving.

To many people at the time the loss of the Lusitania came to symbolise Liverpool’s suffering, as she was the city’s favourite passenger liner.

The spectacular coloured glass war memorial at one of my local churches, St James’s in West Derby, uniquely uses an image of the doomed ship to silently express that grief. Read more…

Justicia justice

31 August 2010 by stepheng

At=rchivbe photo of the Lusitania at the Liverpool landing stage

I came across this story while reading about the conflict at sea during the First World War and was filled with gloom.

This liner seemed to have been earmarked for destruction from the start and was sunk even when under the protection of warships. Her brief life had been blighted by the misfortunes of other great ships.

The 32,234-ton Justicia was built for the Dutch Holland America Line at Belfast’s famous Harland & Wolff shipyard and launched just weeks before war broke out. Read more…

Rescue tugs

15 March 2010 by stepheng

archive photo of a tug

HM Rescue Tug Storm King in March 1943, from the Merseyside Maritime Museum. Image courtesy of the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo.

I was surprised to discover that tugs sailed with convoys of merchant ships bringing vital supplies to Britain during the Second World War.

The role of the tugs was to assist stricken vessels after they were damaged by enemy attacks. Their vital work boosted the war effort by saving hundreds of warships and their crews,

The Royal Navy’s Rescue Tug Section was set up at the beginning of the war to provide suitable ocean-going tugs to save torpedoed ships. This was dangerous work requiring the greatest skills to ensure that ships were brought to safe havens despite bad weather, the presence of U-boat submarines and enemy aircraft. Read more…