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Posts tagged with 'get involved'

National Adoption Week

20 October 2015 by Lucy

Image of the projection

Mary McCartney’s image projected onto the Museum of Liverpool

On Monday 19 October, the Museum of Liverpool took part in a nationwide campaign to mark the beginning of National Adoption Week, which runs from 19 – 25 October.

The Museum played host to a giant projection of an image by celebrity photographer, Mary McCartney, who recently took the official portrait of the Queen.

The image of a small boy captioned ‘Too Old at 4?’ illuminated the exterior of the building, which could be seen from the Strand, drawing attention to the fact that this is the average age of children waiting the longest for adoptive families.

The image has also been projected on other iconic buildings across the country, including City Hall in London, the Blackpool Tower, as well as other locations in Bristol, Manchester, Leicester, Bolton, Birmingham and Newcastle.

There are 660 children waiting for adoptive parents in the North West, and 35 of these children are in Liverpool.

Janet Dugdale, Director of the Museum of Liverpool said:

The exterior of the Museum of Liverpool lends itself really well to projections, and as an iconic building on the waterfront, we really hope that this provides an opportunity for the National Adoption Week message to be seen. We are a family-friendly museum, so our young visitors are extremely important to us. The work that First4Adoption is doing to help find happy homes and families for children is extremely important, so we’re really pleased that the Museum of Liverpool can act as a positive platform to help raise awareness to the people of Liverpool.

For more information, go to www.first4adoption.org.uk/nationaladoptionweek or call First4Adoption on 0300 222 0022.



Appeal – is this you in the photograph?

13 October 2015 by Kay

Mother and sons with Jubilee decorations

Silver Jubilee street party, June 1977, Old Swan, Liverpool

Our display Growing up in the city: in photographs features a range of fantastic photographs depicting Liverpool childhoods from the 1870s to the 1990s, from the Museum of Liverpool’s collections.

After searching through many postcards, photographs and glass plate negatives in our stores, it was a hard choice to select the final 25 images. I could have included so many more – especially as I wanted to ensure that lots of different children and childhoods were represented.

One of my favourites is this image of a young mum, with presumably her two young sons in Old Swan – Ulster Road, we believe. It was taken in June 1977 by local photographer, Harold Douglas Avington. Read more…

Welcome to Black History Month

1 October 2015 by Alison

legacy-gallery-visitor_3As we move into the month of October, Black History month in the UK, Mitty from the Education team tells us all about the events and fun, family friendly activities that are taking place at the museum. Read more…

Our Day Out – get involved, memories matter

16 September 2015 by Kay

Boy at hoopla stall

Photo from Keith Medley Archive Liverpool John Moores University.

Ian Bradley, Media Lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University tells us about the Our Day Out project and partnership exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool.

“The Our Day Out project was inspired by a collection of photographs donated to Liverpool John Moores University by the family of Keith Medley a commercial and press photographer who worked in and around Merseyside for most of his career until his retirement in 1987. Many of the photographs feature New Brighton during its heyday as a popular seaside resort. Read more…

Colomendy Totem Pole

10 September 2015 by Kay

colomendy-totem-pole-topDid you go to Colomendy Centre for Outdoor Education in North Wales like generations of Liverpool children? If so you may remember this Totem Pole, which is now on display in the Museum of Liverpool.

It was made in 1967 at Sefton Park Secondary School by teacher Ken James and his students. Ken was a woodwork and technical drawing teacher at the school from 1963, until 1978.

The Totem Pole was made from a telegraph pole provided by Liverpool GPO. The carvings represent local animals, real and imaginary – including a Welsh dragon on top and a mother and baby bird. Moyra James, Ken’s daughter remembers that it was a close knit school with a great cast of characters, both pupils and staff.  Read more…

Why join the Patron’s circle?

1 September 2015 by Ann

Juliet Staines_blog

The Lady Lever Art Gallery Patron’s Circle has been developed for people who feel passionate about our work developing the Gallery for the future. We spoke to Juliet Staines, our very first patron to learn more about her decision to join the scheme.  Read more…

Liverpool’s Hispanic community – get involved

3 August 2015 by Kay

Chinese costume and fans in museum display

The de Larrinaga family display in the Global City gallery

Liverpool’s many global connections are celebrated across the Museum of Liverpool; including the city’s Hispanic communities. 19th century Liverpool was home to thriving Spanish, Basque, Galician, Filipino and Latin American communities who lived and worked in the maritime and trade networks connecting Liverpool with its sister ports in the Luso-Hispanic world.

In the Global City gallery you can see personal items relating to the de Larrinaga family – a successful Basque shipping family in Liverpool. From the 1860s the Larrinaga Steamship Company made regular journeys to the Philippines, stopping off in the great trading ports of Hong Kong and Singapore. The Larrinaga’s bought silks, lacquer boxes and Chinese-style furniture for their grand Liverpool homes. There is also a painting of one of the Larrinaga line ships – Anselma de Larrinaga on display.

In The People’s Republic gallery there is a ledger from a Basque Boarding House at 41 Hurst Street which records the names and destinations of dozens of Basque migrants who passed through Hurst Street on their way to the New World. Read more…

We dig football!

13 July 2015 by Liz

old map showing houses and fields, with one property highlighted

Detail from James Newlands’ 1847 map of Liverpool showing the Queen’s Head. Courtesy of Digital Archives Association http://digitalarchives.co.uk/

This weekend, on Saturday 18 July, our archaeologists will be heading out looking for a pub – but this one won’t serve them a pint, it’s the site of an important historical event, and is under the ground!

The Museum of Liverpool archaeology team will be leading a community excavation in search of the Queen’s Head, Village Street, Everton in partnership with Friends of Everton Park . We’re looking to find the spot where the agreement was made to rename St Domingo’s Football Club – it became Everton FC in 1879, and from this time grew in size, and became a founder member of the Football League in 1888.

Local historian and former Liverpool Echo sports editor Ken Rogers, author of the best-selling ‘Lost Tribes of Everton’ books has undertaken considerable research about the building, and has discovered Read more…

Discuss, Discover, Draw at the Walker Art Gallery with artist Caroline Johnson

18 June 2015 by Ann

Students at work in the Sculpture Gallery

Students at work in the Sculpture Gallery

Do you enjoy art but would like to learn some new practical skills? We’re now mid-way through a series of free drawing sessions at the Walker Art Gallery with artist Caroline Johnson, suitable for adults of all abilities, with all the materials provided.  These sessions are about exploring your skills and our collections and learning in a friendly environment.  Here Caroline tells us what she and her budding artists have been up to:  Read more…

Remembering the role of Mersey ferries in the First World War

23 April 2015 by Sam

ferry decorated with colourful geometric patterns

The dazzled Mersey ferry Snowdrop

On Sunday Ben Whittaker, curator of maritime history and technology at Merseyside Maritime Museum, is taking part in events to mark the role that the Mersey Ferries played in the First World War, as he explains

“Today, Thursday 23 April, is St George’s Day, and on this day 98 years ago the Mersey ferries Iris and Daffodil took part in the daring First World War raid on Zeebrugge Harbour.  Read more…

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