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Liverpool and the Larrinagas: drop-in afternoon 2 June

25 May 2018 by Kay

Photograph album with old family photos inside

Image copyright John Turton for the Hispanic Liverpool Project

Kirsty Hooper, Head of Hispanic Studies at the University of Warwick, tells us more about an exciting upcoming event held in partnership with the Museum of Liverpool:

“Did you or your family work for the Larrinaga company, at sea, in their Liverpool offices or in one of their family homes around Sefton Park?

Does your family have connections with Liverpool’s Hispanic community?

Do you have information, stories or photographs that you would like to share?

We would love to hear from you at our drop-in event at the Museum of Liverpool, Saturday 2 June 1-4pm. Read more…

History Pinning Merseyside suffrage – get involved

21 May 2018 by Kay

statue of woman holding a banner saying: Courage calls to courage everywhere

Statue of Millicent Fawcett © Fawcett Society

You many have seen recently that this statue of suffrage campaigner Millicent Fawcett was unveiled in Parliament Square, London; the first statue of a woman in the Square.

The statue helps highlight her life’s work of campaigning to get women the vote. One of her other legacies is The Fawcett Society, the UK’s leading charity campaigning for gender equality and women’s rights.

A local branch, Fawcett Society Merseyside was launched on 8 March 2018 (International Women’s Day). One of the group’s aims is to promote our local suffrage history and they are using History Pin to showcase the Merseyside Suffrage Movement, as well as document the local groups’ key events and achievements.  Read more…

The Qin terracotta warriors: a stunning discovery

29 March 2018 by Joe

On the anniversary of the discovery of the Terracotta Warriors in 1974, Senior Archaeologist Janice Li reveals more about the groundbreaking discoveries that followed:
Read more…

Sapphic Suffragettes

31 January 2018 by Kay

Hilary McCollum

Courtesy of Hilary McCollum

Our final blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Hilary McCollum.

Hilary is a feminist activist, writer and campaigner from northwest Ireland. She will be presenting, ‘Sapphic Suffragettes: The key role of lesbians in the fight for Votes for Women’.  Read more…

William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’

29 January 2018 by Kay

Billie-Gina Thomason in front of a board with 'Prisoners' written at the top

Courtesy of Billie-Gina Thomason

Our seventh blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Billie-Gina Thomason.

Billie-Gina, who is a Phd student at Liverpool John Moores University, will be presenting, ‘William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’ from Liverpool’.

She tells us more –

“My talk explores the life of an individual named William Seymour, who lived most of his life as a man. William’s biological identity was revealed after he was arrested and subsequently he chose to be put on trial as ‘Mary Honeywell’, his married female name. Read more…

Save the date – LGBT History Month, OUTing the Past 2018!

5 January 2018 by Kay

photo of Andrew Dineley

Courtesy of Andrew Dineley

Here at the Museum of Liverpool we are delighted to once again be hosting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference. Following on from last year’s success, our festival hub for 2018 will on Saturday 3 February.

In the run up to the exciting day of talks and performances we will be publishing some special guest blogs from our speakers to give you a flavour of the day and to find out more.

Up first is Andrew Dineley, a designer who runs his own creative studio in the city and also writes about design.  Read more…

Galkoff’s tiles saved!

6 December 2017 by Liz

Shop front

The gorgeous green Galkoff tiles were added in 1933.

If you’re travelling in to Liverpool via London Road, you might spot some activity around the old Galkoff’s Kosher butcher’s shop. As part of the Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project the beautiful green tiles from the building are being carefully removed by professional conservators, and will be cleaned and consolidated. Bringing the tiles indoors will ensure their long-term survival. Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) now own the building, and are working with the Museum of Liverpool to preserve the tiles. LSTM are giving the tiles to the museum for their preservation in public ownership in the collections of National Museums Liverpool. The tiles will be mounted and displayed in the Museum of Liverpool from late 2018 for a minimum of five years. Read more…

Tracing Percy Galkoff’s Polish routes

4 December 2017 by Poppy

people looking at documents

Lawrence Galkoff and researcher Agata Jujeczka view documents in Lodz

Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place is a partnership project between Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the Museum of Liverpool. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, research has uncovered fascinating stories linked to this vibrant street from the 19th century to the present. The project focuses on two main heritage assets, Liverpool’s last surviving example of courtyard housing and P Galkoff’s kosher butchers shop. Today the shop’s distinctive green tiled façade represents a sole remnant of a once thriving Jewish community in this area.

In October 2017 the project team embarked on a research trip to Poland. They were joined by Lawrence Galkoff, the great-grandson of P Galkoff’s butchers shop owner Percy Galkoff. Read more…

Peter Banasko – one of the true greats

30 October 2017 by Sarah

Peter Banasko. Courtesy of the Banasko family

Today we have a guest blog by Peter Banasko. He is writing about his father, also called Peter Banasko – a Liverpool lad who became a world-class boxer and was asked to fight before the Prince of Wales, Prince George and Lord Lonsdale. He later became an incredibly successful coach and manager. However, Peter also grew up during the era of the Colour Bar and this blog highlights the prejudices he faced. It is a fascinating local and community history and we wanted to run it during Black History Month. With thanks to the Banasko family for submitting it to us:

Peter Emmanuel Banasko 1915-1993

“Peter Banasko was born and grew up in Liverpool. He was the only child of a mixed marriage. His father, Isaac Immanuel Banasko came from the Gold Coast, Ghana. His mother Lillian Banasko, nee Doyle, came from Liverpool.

“He was named in the birthday celebration of 800 people who put Liverpool on the map. (Liverpool Echo 28/08/2007)

“He attended St. Malachy’s School and started his amateur boxing in 1929 at the famous St. Malachy’s boxing gym. By the time he was 14 he had participated in over 100 fights. At the age of 13, having over 40 undefeated contests to his credit, he claimed the distinction of being the first Liverpool boxer to bring home to Liverpool a British Title by becoming the schoolboy champion of Great Britain in 1929 and again in 1930.

“He was invited to box before the Prince of Wales, Prince George and Lord Lonsdale.

Peter Banasko coaching. Courtesy of the Banasko family.

“At 17 he turned professional under the management of the Liverpool Stadium Promoter, Johnny Best Senior.

“Some said he was the best of the best but unfortunately for Banasko he fought during the era of the infamous ‘Colour Bar’ that forbade any non-white fighter from contesting for a national title. Again this vicious prejudice was evidenced in his marriage to Margaret McNerney, a Liverpool girl. A 300 signature petition was actioned to try and stop this marriage; it was unsuccessful.

“He was the first black manager/trainer in Liverpool, indeed in the UK. He was a friend of Douglas Collister (United Africa Co.) and also Jack Farnsworth (British West Africa CO). Because of this by the early 1950s Banasko and Liverpool were a household names in Lagos.

“His reputation as an excellent manager spread to the Gold Coast.

“According to the boxing purists at that time the black boxers fought in a distinct ‘unscientific’ style; they failed to master ‘the noble art’. However, their performances in the ring soon shattered these stereotypes. Banasko was a contributing factor in this change of opinion. When opposing boxers where facing the ‘Banasko camp’ it was not the boxer they feared but Banasko because of his knowledge and expertise.

“Banasko gained the rank of sergeant with the Royal Berkshire Regiment. His request for a commission was turned down. He was advised he would stand a better chance of a commission if he joined the Indian Army!

“This prejudice came up again when Hogan Kid Bassey won the British Empire Featherweight title. He told Banasko in the dressing room after the fight that he wanted a change of manager. Bassey had been convinced that he would not get any further in his career under a black manager. Banasko, disgusted with this prejudice and gutted by Bassey’s disloyalty, parted from the sport he loved.

“Ian Hargraves in his article in the Liverpool Echo (November 30th 1993) ‘Salute to boxing’s unsung hero’ on his death in November 1993 summed it up completely by stating:

Peter Banasko… a rare talent – one of the true greats’ “.

Peter Banasko and the boxers he coached to success. Courtesy of Banasko family.

 

If you enjoyed this blog, you might be interested in our Black History Month events throughout October.

 

Could World Museum have some of the oldest human remains in Europe?

16 August 2017 by Jennifer Grindley

Dr Emma Pomeroy from Liverpool John Moores University reveals all about some exciting discoveries in World Museum’s collections.

We’re excited to announce a new collaborative project led by researchers from the School of Natural Sciences and Psychology at Liverpool John Moores University and World Museum. The project will radiocarbon date five human teeth and part of a jawbone from World Museum’s collections. These all come from the same site that yielded the oldest known human remains from north-west Europe. These teeth and jaw could be important evidence for some of the earliest members of our species in

George Smerdon, site foreman for William Pengelly’s excavations, at the entrance to Kent’s Cavern in 1890. Photo from the British Geological Surve

the UK.
Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.