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Posts tagged with 'human rights'

Encounters – Broken Lives

7 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of a JoginiTo accompany our powerful new exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, we have a series of talks and events exploring the themes and issues in the display. The next talk on Saturday 11 July will highlight how some Dalit women and girls are forced into ritual sex slavery as Joginis and what is being done to combat this exploitation. Later on in the year on 21 November, author David Skivington will be talking about why modern slavery in India is central to his writing.

Here, David tells us more about what inspired him to use his second novel to raise awareness of the Jogini system: Read more…

Helping to mend broken lives

9 June 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Jeeva Kumar

Modern slavery is a global issue and the International Slavery Museum works closely with organisations who campaign against these human rights abuses. Our next exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, developed in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, will highlight the exploitation of India’s Dalit community. Jeeva Kumar, Director of Pratigya India, will be giving a talk at the museum during the opening weekend. Here Jeeva tells us more about her work to combat trafficking of girls and women in south India:

“Poised on the Uhuru peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro, I savoured the moment of triumph, having overcome many obstacles to scale the peak. I was one of the 48 women who climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro as part of our movement’s initiative to raise awareness and funds to fight human trafficking all over the world. Uhuru in Swahili means ‘Freedom’ and the climb was a symbolic representation of overcoming the struggles faced by the oppressed, enslaved, exploited and trafficked women and children, every day. Read more…

Students honour Alice Seeley Harris as an Unsung Hero

19 May 2015 by Lucy Johnson

A black and white photograph of Alice Seeley Harris sat on a chair on her 100th birthday

Alice Seeley Harris on her 100th birthday in 1970.

Alice Seeley Harris’ photographs of the Free State Congo in the 1900s revealed the horror of colonial violence and exploitation to the world. Our exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum highlights how these images were used to overthrow King Leopold II’s brutal regime. Over a century after Alice took these photographs, students in Kansas have been inspired by her story and have developed a wonderful project acknowledging her work. One of the students tells us more…

“My name is Avery Stratton. I am a senior at Washburn Rural High School in Topeka, Kansas, in the United States. A couple of my peers and I are currently working on an entry for the Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes Project competition in Fort Scott, Kansas, which is an effort to highlight individuals who have demonstrated immense courage and compassion in the past who may have not received the recognition they deserve

Alexis Balaun, one of our team members, discovered Alice Seeley Harris while watching a documentary on the Congo. Alice’s heart-wrenching photos were showcased, but not much was said about the person behind the camera. Intrigued by this brave woman, Alexis presented her to our group and we knew that Alice would make the perfect focus for our project.  Read more…

Flying the flag for the trans community

30 April 2015 by Kay

group photo of people holding up the large flag

April Ashley, Lord Mayor Councillor Erica Kemp, Kay Jones from the Museum of Liverpool and representatives of the Trans community with the first Trans Pride Flag

At a special ceremony at Liverpool Town Hall yesterday, transgender pioneer and campaigner, April Ashley MBE was presented with a Citizen of Honour Award on her 80th birthday.

As part of the ceremony, the Museum of Liverpool was presented with the first Transgender Pride Flag to be flown above Liverpool Town Hall for Transgender Day of Remembrance, 20 November 2014. Read more…

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

International Women’s Day – Ethel Singleton

4 March 2015 by Kay

Ethel Singleton

Ethel Singleton (1933 – 2014). By kind permission of Nick Broomfield

International Women’s Day, 8 March, celebrates women’s achievements. This is the second post featuring inspiring Liverpool women who are represented in the Museum of Liverpool. There are also free special events taking place this weekend to mark the day.

Ethel, from Old Swan, became involved in tenant activism during the 1960s and ’70s. She was one of the many people in the city who went on strike against proposed unjust rent increases brought about by the Housing Finance Act in 1972. Read more…

International Women’s Day – Bessie Braddock

2 March 2015 by Kay

portrait photo of Bessie Braddock

Bessie Braddock, MP (1899-1970)

International Women’s Day, 8 March, celebrates women’s achievements, so this week on the blog we are looking at a couple of inspiring Liverpool women who are represented in the Museum of Liverpool. There are also free special events taking place on Sunday to mark the day.

Bessie Braddock was MP for Liverpool Exchange from 1945-70. She was an outspoken campaigner for better health, housing and education for the poor.  She rejected a ministerial post because, like her husband Council Leader Jack Braddock, she preferred to remain locally-focused and be a fierce advocate for her home city. Read more…

LGBT History Month – an Everton football first!

26 February 2015 by Kay

Football boots with rainbow laces

February is LGBT History Month, which is an appropriate time to show you this recent addition to our collection.

Everton Football Club became the first UK club to publicly support Stonewall’s Rainbow Laces campaign to kick homophobia out of football. Players wore these laces in their match against West Ham at Upton Park, 21 September 2013.

The special rainbow coloured laces were distributed to all professional clubs in the country and players were asked to wear them to demonstrate their solidarity for fellow players who are gay on Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 September. Read more…

“We were asked to go to Australia. We didn’t even know where it was…”

12 December 2014 by Dickie

Black and white image of school children clutching dolls

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) far left departing for Australia in August 1950.

The Merseyside Maritime Museum exhibition On Their Own: Britain’s child migrants, tells the heart-breaking story of child migration.

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) was ten years old when she left her home in Ormskirk for a new life in Australia. This is her emotional story of loss and resilience…  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Artist, Peter N Spencer (1924 – 1987)

11 December 2014 by Kay

MOL.2011.93.1This is our second feature for UK Disability History Month, 2014. This year’s theme is War and Impairment: The Social Consequences of Disablement.

Peter Spencer, a well-known foot and mouth artist, painted this image of a Starways Viscount aircraft in flight in 1964. Peter had been a pilot during the Second World War and lost the use of his arms and hands following an aircraft accident 27 March 1945.

With great dedication and endurance, he learned to paint and to draw holding the brush in his mouth. His works were exhibited widely and he was awarded an MBE in 1980 for his human and artistic achievements.
Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.