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Posts tagged with 'human rights'

“We were asked to go to Australia. We didn’t even know where it was…”

12 December 2014 by Dickie

Black and white image of school children clutching dolls

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) far left departing for Australia in August 1950.

The Merseyside Maritime Museum exhibition On Their Own: Britain’s child migrants, tells the heart-breaking story of child migration.

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) was ten years old when she left her home in Ormskirk for a new life in Australia. This is her emotional story of loss and resilience…  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Artist, Peter N Spencer (1924 – 1987)

11 December 2014 by Kay

MOL.2011.93.1This is our second feature for UK Disability History Month, 2014. This year’s theme is War and Impairment: The Social Consequences of Disablement.

Peter Spencer, a well-known foot and mouth artist, painted this image of a Starways Viscount aircraft in flight in 1964. Peter had been a pilot during the Second World War and lost the use of his arms and hands following an aircraft accident 27 March 1945.

With great dedication and endurance, he learned to paint and to draw holding the brush in his mouth. His works were exhibited widely and he was awarded an MBE in 1980 for his human and artistic achievements.
Read more…

Funding award to highlight LGBT collections

4 December 2014 by Lucy

Image of man sitting in front of David Hockney painting

‘David Hockney: Early reflections’ exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery

We are delighted to announce that National Museums Liverpool has been awarded a significant grant to fund research into its Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) collections in its art galleries and urban history items at the Museum of Liverpool.

The £91,863 grant from the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund will be used to support the ‘Pride and Prejudice’ project, which we will develop with partner Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove, based within one of the UK’s most prominent LGBT communities.

‘Pride and Prejudice’ is a two-year project, that will tackle the challenges faced across the museum sector, by realising the full potential of LGBT collections to ensure that objects and stories within these collections are fully researched, sensitively interpreted and made accessible online and through display to a wide and diverse audience. Read more…

World AIDS Day

1 December 2014 by Kay

red ribbon in the Museum of Liverpool window

Today, Monday 1 December, is World AIDS Day. The day is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. Merseyside has supported World AIDS Day every year since it started in 1988 with events to show solidarity with people here and all over the world.

The universal symbol of awareness and support for people living with HIV is the Red Ribbon. It was designed in 1991 by Visual AIDS, a New York based group of artist HIV activists. It was the first time a ribbon was used to raise public awareness. Read more…

The ‘Thomas Splint’ – UK Disability History Month

21 November 2014 by Kay

Splint with long sticks and padded ends for attaching to a leg, in museum display case

The Thomas Splint on display in the Museum of Liverpool. Lent by the Thackray Museum, Leeds

The theme of this year’s UK Disability History Month, 22 November – 22 December, is War and Impairment: The Social Consequences of Disablement.

With the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, the treatment of war disabled people casts a long shadow, with the unprecedented number of newly disabled people created by the world’s first industrial and total war.

We have on display in The People’s Republic gallery, Museum of Liverpool, this splint known as a ‘Thomas Splint’ after its inventor Hugh Owen Thomas (1834 – 1891). Thomas was a surgeon from North Wales, who treated many people in Liverpool’s slums.  Read more…

Radical Liverpool in art

3 November 2014 by Kay

Painting of Rushton holding blinded people and a figure who has broken free from chains

Detail of the dome mural by Mick Jones, showing Edward Rushton

I recently visited the Liverpool Biennial group show at the Liverpool School for the Blind building, Hardman Street, just before it closed. It was a rare chance to see inside the building (normally closed to the public), particularly the large mural, painted by Mick Jones in the early 1980s when the building was the Merseyside Trade Union Community and Unemployed Resource Centre.

I was especially interested in the mural as we have a large painting ‘Unemployment on Merseyside – Campaigning for the Right to Work’, also by Mick, on display in The People’s Republic gallery which was commissioned by the Museum of Liverpool Life in 1993. Read more…

Creating a same-sex marriage equality quilt

28 October 2014 by Kay

Courtesy of Oly Bliss

Courtesy of Oly Bliss

Young artist Oly Bliss is creating a unique quilt to record and celebrate the 396 Members of Parliament who voted for same-sex marriage in July 2013.

You can get involved by helping to decorate unique hand-drawn portraits created by Oly on Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 November. The images will be incorporated into the giant quilt forming a geographical map, showcasing how MP’s voted across the UK. Read more…

Dr David Fleming: “What does the democratic museum look like?”

9 July 2014 by David Fleming

man in glasses and shirt and tie outside museum

Dr David Fleming

What follows is the last in a five part series looking at museums and democracy, this time explaining what a democratic museum should look like and where its priorities should lie.

The series is from the text of a lecture I gave in May 2014 at Liverpool’s Institute of Cultural Capital research symposium entitled ‘The Arts, Them and Us: creating a more equitable system for subsidised culture’. Read more…

Refugee Week – Anny’s sewing machine

24 June 2014 by Kay

o_cadf12a78d565460-0kjRefugee week is a unique opportunity to discover and celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK.

In The People’s Republic gallery in the Museum of Liverpool there are many personal stories and objects which help reveal migration journeys to the city.

One of these special objects is this Pfaff sewing machine which was brought to Liverpool by Anny Foa who fled Turin, Italy in 1939 when life was blown apart by the turmoil of the Second World War. Read more…

Not everyone wants culture in reverential silence

23 June 2014 by David Fleming

man in glasses tie and white shirt smilng

What follows is the fourth of a five part series looking at museums and democracy, this time explaining how museums failed to respond effectively to the rise of the working classes. The series is from the text of a lecture I gave in May 2014 at Liverpool’s Institute of Cultural Capital research symposium entitled ‘The Arts, Them and Us: creating a more equitable system for subsidised culture’. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.