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Posts tagged with 'human rights'

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

International Women’s Day – Ethel Singleton

4 March 2015 by Kay

Ethel Singleton

Ethel Singleton (1933 – 2014). By kind permission of Nick Broomfield

International Women’s Day, 8 March, celebrates women’s achievements. This is the second post featuring inspiring Liverpool women who are represented in the Museum of Liverpool. There are also free special events taking place this weekend to mark the day.

Ethel, from Old Swan, became involved in tenant activism during the 1960s and ’70s. She was one of the many people in the city who went on strike against proposed unjust rent increases brought about by the Housing Finance Act in 1972. Read more…

International Women’s Day – Bessie Braddock

2 March 2015 by Kay

portrait photo of Bessie Braddock

Bessie Braddock, MP (1899-1970)

International Women’s Day, 8 March, celebrates women’s achievements, so this week on the blog we are looking at a couple of inspiring Liverpool women who are represented in the Museum of Liverpool. There are also free special events taking place on Sunday to mark the day.

Bessie Braddock was MP for Liverpool Exchange from 1945-70. She was an outspoken campaigner for better health, housing and education for the poor.  She rejected a ministerial post because, like her husband Council Leader Jack Braddock, she preferred to remain locally-focused and be a fierce advocate for her home city. Read more…

LGBT History Month – an Everton football first!

26 February 2015 by Kay

Football boots with rainbow laces

February is LGBT History Month, which is an appropriate time to show you this recent addition to our collection.

Everton Football Club became the first UK club to publicly support Stonewall’s Rainbow Laces campaign to kick homophobia out of football. Players wore these laces in their match against West Ham at Upton Park, 21 September 2013.

The special rainbow coloured laces were distributed to all professional clubs in the country and players were asked to wear them to demonstrate their solidarity for fellow players who are gay on Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 September. Read more…

“We were asked to go to Australia. We didn’t even know where it was…”

12 December 2014 by Dickie

Black and white image of school children clutching dolls

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) far left departing for Australia in August 1950.

The Merseyside Maritime Museum exhibition On Their Own: Britain’s child migrants, tells the heart-breaking story of child migration.

Anne Swifte (nee Duxbury) was ten years old when she left her home in Ormskirk for a new life in Australia. This is her emotional story of loss and resilience…  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Artist, Peter N Spencer (1924 – 1987)

11 December 2014 by Kay

MOL.2011.93.1This is our second feature for UK Disability History Month, 2014. This year’s theme is War and Impairment: The Social Consequences of Disablement.

Peter Spencer, a well-known foot and mouth artist, painted this image of a Starways Viscount aircraft in flight in 1964. Peter had been a pilot during the Second World War and lost the use of his arms and hands following an aircraft accident 27 March 1945.

With great dedication and endurance, he learned to paint and to draw holding the brush in his mouth. His works were exhibited widely and he was awarded an MBE in 1980 for his human and artistic achievements.
Read more…

Funding award to highlight LGBT collections

4 December 2014 by Lucy

Image of man sitting in front of David Hockney painting

‘David Hockney: Early reflections’ exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery

We are delighted to announce that National Museums Liverpool has been awarded a significant grant to fund research into its Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) collections in its art galleries and urban history items at the Museum of Liverpool.

The £91,863 grant from the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund will be used to support the ‘Pride and Prejudice’ project, which we will develop with partner Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove, based within one of the UK’s most prominent LGBT communities.

‘Pride and Prejudice’ is a two-year project, that will tackle the challenges faced across the museum sector, by realising the full potential of LGBT collections to ensure that objects and stories within these collections are fully researched, sensitively interpreted and made accessible online and through display to a wide and diverse audience. Read more…

World AIDS Day

1 December 2014 by Kay

red ribbon in the Museum of Liverpool window

Today, Monday 1 December, is World AIDS Day. The day is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. Merseyside has supported World AIDS Day every year since it started in 1988 with events to show solidarity with people here and all over the world.

The universal symbol of awareness and support for people living with HIV is the Red Ribbon. It was designed in 1991 by Visual AIDS, a New York based group of artist HIV activists. It was the first time a ribbon was used to raise public awareness. Read more…

The ‘Thomas Splint’ – UK Disability History Month

21 November 2014 by Kay

Splint with long sticks and padded ends for attaching to a leg, in museum display case

The Thomas Splint on display in the Museum of Liverpool. Lent by the Thackray Museum, Leeds

The theme of this year’s UK Disability History Month, 22 November – 22 December, is War and Impairment: The Social Consequences of Disablement.

With the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, the treatment of war disabled people casts a long shadow, with the unprecedented number of newly disabled people created by the world’s first industrial and total war.

We have on display in The People’s Republic gallery, Museum of Liverpool, this splint known as a ‘Thomas Splint’ after its inventor Hugh Owen Thomas (1834 – 1891). Thomas was a surgeon from North Wales, who treated many people in Liverpool’s slums.  Read more…

Radical Liverpool in art

3 November 2014 by Kay

Painting of Rushton holding blinded people and a figure who has broken free from chains

Detail of the dome mural by Mick Jones, showing Edward Rushton

I recently visited the Liverpool Biennial group show at the Liverpool School for the Blind building, Hardman Street, just before it closed. It was a rare chance to see inside the building (normally closed to the public), particularly the large mural, painted by Mick Jones in the early 1980s when the building was the Merseyside Trade Union Community and Unemployed Resource Centre.

I was especially interested in the mural as we have a large painting ‘Unemployment on Merseyside – Campaigning for the Right to Work’, also by Mick, on display in The People’s Republic gallery which was commissioned by the Museum of Liverpool Life in 1993. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.