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Posts tagged with 'human rights'

Trailblazing transgender service in the British military

13 February 2017 by Kay

Caroline holding up her military uniform jacket

© Stephen King

Our 3rd blog post from one of our inspiring speakers from OUTing the Past: The 3rd National Festival of LGBT History conference, 25 February is Caroline Paige.

Caroline, born in Wallasey, became the first officer to transition gender in the British Armed Forces. She had already served 19 years in the RAF, on fighter aircraft and battlefield helicopters, and following her transition, completed a further 16 years.

Her fascinating talk will reveal the untold story of what it meant to be transgender in the British military before and after permissive LGBT service, the highs and the lows, in peacetime and in war.  Read more…

A warrior with some marker pens, glue and a photocopier!

6 February 2017 by Kay

red ribbon design with hearts

Our second blog post from one of our excellent speakers from OUTing the Past: The 3rd National Festival of LGBT History conference, which is coming to the Museum of Liverpool on 25 February, is Andrew Dineley. Andrew is the Creative Director of Soft Octopus Design Studio and will be discussing his activism and work designing, amongst many other things, Liverpool’s influential first HIV/AIDS public health materials in the 1980s. Read more…

‘Corruption of public morals’! – OUTing the Past

31 January 2017 by Kay

newspaper front page

International Times with ‘Busted’ headline. Courtesy Liverpool John Moores University

In the run up to our free conference OUTing the Past: The 3rd National Festival of LGBT History on 25 February, we will be publishing some special guest blogs by our exciting speakers to give you a flavour of the day and to find out more.

Our first is Valerie Stevenson, Head of Academic Services, Liverpool John Moores University who will be revealing the prosecution case of the International Times newspaper and the ‘corruption of public morals’. Read more…

New LGBT objects uncovered

5 December 2016 by Kay

Shaun Duggan with cup of tea

Shaun Duggan

Two new themes, Love and Relationships and Sex and Eroticism (what everyone’s been waiting for!) have now been launched as part of our Pride and Prejudice research project.

We have discovered some fascinating objects in our collections which tell a range of stories and histories. Some of my highlights featured are – Read more…

OUTing the Past

9 November 2016 by Kay

text

LGBT History Month 2017

Here, at the Museum of Liverpool, we are committed to telling diverse and hidden histories and ensuring that our collections and displays represent our local communities as much as possible. Read more…

Should young people have the right to vote on laws which affect them?

8 January 2016 by Sarah

Takeover blog 1

This was one of the questions sparking debate and creativity during the Human Rights School’s Parliament at the International Slavery Museum.

We were fortunate on the day to be joined by fantastic participants from Childwall Sports and Science Academy, Sandfield Park School, Calderstones School and Weatherhead High School. Read more…

International Human Rights Day : what’s on?

7 December 2015 by Angelica

Hands of Change: a photo of the artwork created by the participants from City Hearts

Human Rights Day is observed by the international community every year on 10 December.

This marks the day in 1948 that the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

This important document sets out fundamental human rights to be universally protected for all. Read more…

Pride and Prejudice – but not what you think!

30 September 2015 by Matt

programme cover with illustration of the theatre

Royal Court Theatre Programme, 1951

A lot of my colleagues saw the title of the Pride and Prejudice project and thought we were doing an exhibition on Jane Austen, or at the very least Georgian life.  Luckily for me, they were wrong.  Instead what we have started work on is an amazingly interesting but admittedly challenging task.  We are undertaking a unique two year project, funded by the Esmee Fairbairn Collections Fund, to identify, research and better present objects and stories relating to Liverpool’s Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) communities held within our collections. Easy? Think again… Read more…

Encounters – Broken Lives

7 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of a JoginiTo accompany our powerful new exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, we have a series of talks and events exploring the themes and issues in the display. The next talk on Saturday 11 July will highlight how some Dalit women and girls are forced into ritual sex slavery as Joginis and what is being done to combat this exploitation. Later on in the year on 21 November, author David Skivington will be talking about why modern slavery in India is central to his writing.

Here, David tells us more about what inspired him to use his second novel to raise awareness of the Jogini system: Read more…

Helping to mend broken lives

9 June 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Jeeva Kumar

Modern slavery is a global issue and the International Slavery Museum works closely with organisations who campaign against these human rights abuses. Our next exhibition Broken Lives: slavery in modern India, developed in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, will highlight the exploitation of India’s Dalit community. Jeeva Kumar, Director of Pratigya India, will be giving a talk at the museum during the opening weekend. Here Jeeva tells us more about her work to combat trafficking of girls and women in south India:

“Poised on the Uhuru peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro, I savoured the moment of triumph, having overcome many obstacles to scale the peak. I was one of the 48 women who climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro as part of our movement’s initiative to raise awareness and funds to fight human trafficking all over the world. Uhuru in Swahili means ‘Freedom’ and the climb was a symbolic representation of overcoming the struggles faced by the oppressed, enslaved, exploited and trafficked women and children, every day. Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.