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Posts tagged with 'international slavery museum'

Show us pictures of your visit to the International Slavery Museum

18 August 2014 by Mitty

children with their faces painted, listening intently to an unseen storyteller

Family activities at last year’s Slavery Remembrance Day © Simon Webb

So we’re in the midst of the summer holidays!!  Here at the International Slavery Museum we have great free events every day of the week for all to enjoy, so far we’ve been having fun with flags, making funky shakers and also decorating traditional West African mask designs. Loads of you come every day to enjoy our sessions and we would love to see what you are making!

Do you fancy sharing your pictures? You could tag International Slavery Museum on facebook or @slaverymuseum on twitter – and if you’re not following us, why not?! Read more…

Walking in the footsteps of Glasgow’s past

5 August 2014 by Richard

Crowds outside the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art

Hello,

Last week I spoke at the ‘Untold Stories, Buried Histories’ panel event in Glasgow, part of  The Empire Café, a week long exploration of Scotland’s relationship with slavery and Atlantic slave trade.  It was planned so that it ran for the duration of the Commonwealth Games.  This is particularly interesting as the legacy and relevancy of the Commonwealth is widely discussed and debated.   It did not take me long to see the legacy of Glasgow’s role in the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as I walked to the venue past the Gallery of Modern Art (once the townhouse of William Cunninghame, a prominent Glaswegian tobacco merchant) and Buchanan and Ingram Streets, both named after merchants who also became rich on the suffering of those working on their plantations. Read more…

Paddling spirit into our lives

11 July 2014 by Andrew

Laura Facey artwork from Their Spirits exhibition

Artist talk at the International Slavery Museum

In advance of Laura Facey’s in conversation talk with art critic Edward Lucie-Smith, Saturday 19 July at 2pm, the artist describes how it felt to work with the International Slavery Museum on Their Spirits.The talk is free, more information can be found here.

“Paddling spirits into our lives… these words were said by me but singled out by the International Slavery Museum as they interviewed me in October 2013 in preparation for my upcoming exhibition Their Spirits. It is a wonderful thing and an honor to be listened to so carefully that captions are made.  Read more…

Maya Angelou: a soulful life

30 May 2014 by Richard

Maya Angelou at TSGHello,

Sadly, the great poet, author and activist Maya Angelou – born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1928 has passed.  She opened the Transatlantic Slavery gallery (predecessor to the International Slavery Museum) in 1994. Tony Tibbles, who later became the Director of the Merseyside Maritime Museum, worked closely on the development of the groundbreaking gallery and wrote an interesting article on how it came to be.   He notes how they persuaded Maya Angelou to attend the opening and indeed we still have a plaque in our collection which marks this unique event.  Read more…

Celebrating African World Cup legends

26 May 2014 by Mitty

African children holding two footballs

Image courtesy of Charity Ball

How do you explain football to someone who has never heard of it?

You don’t, you give them a ball.

Football is brilliantly absurd in how it manages to turn a simple and accessible game  into such an amazing spectacle. This June will see the World Cup come to Brazil and the biggest show of the year will be shared by literally billions of ecstatic football fans world wide, all hoping this will be their year to celebrate! Read more…

12 Years a Slave competition

13 May 2014 by Andrew

12YAS-image-web

12 Years a Slave first prize bundle

To celebrate the Blu-ray and DVD release of 12 Years a Slave out May 12, we have three copies of the DVD, book and soundtrack to give away, as well as seven copies of the book and soundtrack. Read more…

MAMA perfomance at the International Slavery Museum

8 May 2014 by Mitty

choir singing on stage

We’re really lucky to be welcoming the  MAMA choir to perform at the International Slavery Museum on 10 May. Here are a few words from the group to explain what they stand for;

“We are MAMA, migrant artists mutual aid, an organization that brings together migrants in crisis.We come together in a group of mainly women asylum seekers who feel themselves under threat of removal from the UK. Together we try to explore options of campaigning, i.e. highlighting some of the injustices of the UK asylum system, and we give each other support and solidarity. Read more…

My Family, My Pride: Maroon Ancestry

7 May 2014 by Andrew

An image of guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

Guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

I don’t remember the first time I heard about my Maroon ancestry, Mother would talk about Jamaica often, stories about farming, school or just sitting on the veranda watching the sun set but the Maroon heritage heartened every story. Bump Grave, the blowing of the abeng, warriors disguised as trees; stories of real people, their customs and traditions passed down to me through my Mother. I do remember feeling the immense pride in belonging to a group of such resilient, resourceful and spirited people. Read more…

How Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery

1 May 2014 by Dickie

head and shoulders image of man smiling

Author and historian David Fiske

The film 12 Years a Slave, which tells the story of Solomon Northup, has gripped audiences around the globe. To coincide with the release of the movie on Blu-ray and DVD, author and historian David Fiske blogs about the man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery.
Read more…

Ancient African Empires

22 April 2014 by Mitty

bronze sculpture of a woman's head

Benin sculpture of the Queen Mother’s head

Fred, an Education Demonstrator at the International Slavery Museum, has written about one of the fascinating aspects of African history that you can find out about in the museum:

“As a slavery museum, we also learn about West Africa. European slave traders justified their mistreatment and exploitation of African people by painting a picture of Africa as a simple or “primitive” place compared to European civilisations. In reality, a series of powerful empires, with skilled craftsmen and complex societies existed in West Africa before and during the period of transatlantic slavery, including the once mighty Kingdom of Benin. We’ve added new objects to our Life in West Africa session to reflect this. Read more…