Blog

A visit to Tate – Glen Ligon : Encounters and Collisions

15 October 2015 by Richard

Glenn Ligon - Untitled 2006

Glenn Ligon Untitled 2006
© Glenn Ligon; courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London

In this guest blog, produced for Tate Liverpool, I talk of my recent visit to the gallery’s major exhibition curated by one of America’s most distinguished contemporary artists, Glenn Ligon (b.1960, New York) – Glenn Ligon: Encounters and Collisions.

My first guest blog for Tate Liverpool also happens to be during UK Black History Month (rather than US Black History Month which is in February).  Dr. Carter G. Woodson, often referred to as the father of African American history, established what was originally called ‘Negro History Week’ in 1926.   The week became a month, February chosen as it contains the birthdays of influential figures such as Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. It was against this backdrop that I visited Glenn Ligon: Encounters and Collisions at Tate Liverpool. Read more…

Thrown out of his village: now bringing hope to thousands

15 October 2015 by Alison

Kavi

Kumar Swamy is South India Director for the Dalit Freedom Network and is responsible for oversight of a range of on the ground education, healthcare and economic programmes run for the benefit of Dalit communities in India. These trafficking prevention projects are helping to bring about real change – not only freeing Dalits from modern forms of slavery, but freeing them from the factors that make them so vulnerable to exploitation and abuse in the first place. Here Kumar tells us of the challenges he faced growing up as a young Dalit boy in India, and of the work going on to bring about meaningful and long-lasting change in the country he loves. Read more…

Did you know Black boxers were banned from becoming British Champions until the 1940’s?

7 October 2015 by Sarah

Kid Tanner photoLiverpool journalist and author, Gary Shaw, writes for us ahead of his free talk at the International Slavery Museum on 10 October for Black History Month, on the rise and role of the colour bar in British boxing:

“Not a well-known aspect of sports history by academic, let alone popular historians, the rise and role of the colour bar in British boxing is a sorry tale of establishment resentment, colonial self-glorification and bureaucratic stubbornness that prevented a host of domestic fighters from competing for their own national titles as a professional due simply and sadly to the colour of their skin.

“Introduced almost in a fit of transatlantic pique by the semi-aristocratic owners and members of the National Sporting Club that ran British boxing at the time, the ban, informal at first but effective nevertheless, ran from 1911 until 1947, when pressure from papers, public and even Parliament forced the British Boxing Board of Control to repeal a clause they had embraced unquestionably on their formation as the governing body of the sport in 1929.

“For almost four decades, Britain was aligned with South Africa as the only countries in the world that prohibited black fighters from becoming national champions in their own country. The ban continued throughout the First and Second World Wars – the self-evident and tragic contradiction of the latter being one of the main reasons why calls for it to be repealed became so vociferous from 1944 onwards.

“My presentation touches on all these aspects, showing how wider social, economic and political arguments were used to highlight both the reasoning behind the ban’s introduction, and the rationale for its eventual abolition. In so doing, I will showcase a number of key individuals who, up until now, have rarely been referred to by historians of Black culture in Britain as well as the wider, and ever expanding, sports historian network”.

Find out more about Black History Month and our programme of free events throughout October.

Welcome to Black History Month

1 October 2015 by Alison

legacy-gallery-visitor_3As we move into the month of October, Black History month in the UK, Mitty from the Education team tells us all about the events and fun, family friendly activities that are taking place at the museum. Read more…

Fashion victim?

17 September 2015 by Alison

Indian girls hands

Image courtesy of STOP THE TRAFFIK

Are the garments you’re wearing today free from human trafficking, or is a heartbreaking story woven through their fabric?

Carolyn Kitto, Co-Director STOP THE TRAFFIK Australia Coalition, highlights the challenges facing fashion consumers, retailers and manufacturers:

“About 16 young women had been waiting for us to arrive in a small and stiflingly hot room. They were in their late teens and early 20s. They were all eager to tell their stories of being in the Sumangali Scheme. This Scheme is a form of bonded labour and human trafficking which targets the poorest families of India. Read more…

Celebrating Heritage: events in September

4 September 2015 by Mitty

Adam Duckworth scaled

Adam Duckworth, Education Demonstrator, giving the first of September’s Wednesday 3pm ‘Collections in Focus’ talks which highlight Liverpool’s connections to transatlantic slavery

As the holidays have now finished and we settle back into delivering our school sessions we are celebrating our Heritage status and we have some events and activities throughout the month. We have a fantastic group of speakers for our event on the 19 September, Heritage in Focus. Read more…

A Black History of Britain?

21 August 2015 by Sarah

David Olusoga

David Olusoga

British-Nigerian historian, broadcaster and film-maker, David Olusoga is delivering the keynote lecture this evening at the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, as part of a weekend of free events to commemorate Slavery Remembrance Day on Sunday 23 August.  Read more…

Slavery Remembrance Day: unless we remember, it will not end

20 August 2015 by Richard

Dorothy Kuya with Paul Robeson, Jr. 2007

Dorothy Kuya with Paul Robeson, Jr. 2007

Ahead of Slavery Remembrance Day on Sunday 23 August, Dr Richard Benjamin, Head of the International Slavery Museum, explains the background to the Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture, and writes on the importance of this annual commemoration:  Read more…

It’s a left-handed thing

13 August 2015 by Emma Duffy

Proud to be left-handed

Our Internal Communications Officer, Emma Duffy, on why she’s happy to be celebrating International Left Handers Day.

I love being left-handed (one of the 10% of the world’s population that is), not only that but I’m proud to be left-handed. In years gone by, being left-handed was frowned upon. Children were forcibly made to write with their right-hand. Left-handedness was associated with all things evil, and southpaws were considered to be ‘children of the Devil’. Even the word ‘left’ has negative connotations, coming from the Anglo-Saxon word ‘lyft’ meaning weak or broken. The Latin word for left is ‘sinister’ which doesn’t exactly conjure up positive images either! But today – International Left Handers Day – all those dated concepts can be swept aside and the contribution of awesome left-handers can be celebrated, and awareness raised of the everyday troubles faced by lefties the world over. Read more…

Continuing the Journey

23 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Clint Agard, who contributed to the project

Clint Agard – project contributor

Continuing the Journey at the International Slavery Museum gives an insight into experiences of racism in Merseyside. Leila Romaya from Stray Cat Media tell us more about the project and how it developed…

” ‘Racism is a cancer on this earth’ said one contributor to the project, poet and urban griot Levi Tafari. Continuing the Journey provides a powerful platform that acknowledges the racism that people of African and Caribbean heritage have experienced and continue to experience.

The project’s aim was to give contributors a voice to share their often painful and traumatic experiences of racism through film, photography and audio recordings, as well as offering a wider platform for learning, discussion and debate so that we can work together towards a more cohesive, respectful and accepting future in which illogical racial and cultural stereotypes have no place in our lives.  Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

Subscribe

RSS RSS Feed

Disclaimer

We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.