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Posts tagged with 'international slavery museum'

Dr Richard Benjamin’s New Year wish: “A world free from discrimination and hate…”

23 December 2013 by Dickie

A photo of famous Black faces on a wall at the Museum

Nelson Mandela is on the Museum’s Black Achievers Wall. Photo copyright Lee Garland

The Long Walk continues.  Hello, it is always hard to write the final blog of the year.   Like previous years for the Museum, 2013 has been a bit of a whirlwind.   Read more…

Let’s keep Mandela legacy alive

10 December 2013 by Richard

green and yellow banner with the words Liverpool 8 against apartheid

Liverpool 8 Against Apartheid banner used in the 1980s.

Like millions of people across the globe I was saddened to hear the news that one of the great leaders of modern times – and a true freedom fighter – Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, affectionately known as Madiba, has passed away.  Such news is often hard to digest; things really don’t quite seem the same when someone of such stature, such presence and indeed familiarity is no longer with us.  But someone like Mandela will always leave an enormously influential legacy – in his case – hope rather than hate.   Even though he spent 27 years of his life in prison for his beliefs, fighting for political freedom and social justice, he still had the courage and character not to be engulfed by rage on his release from Robben Island in 1990. Read more…

Skype chat with a school in Virginia

4 December 2013 by Mitty

skype-chat

A few months back I was asked if it would be possible to do a Skype chat with a school in Virginia, USA.  A teacher had got in touch through the website after they had learnt about the sorts of school sessions that we do. Read more…

Takeover day!

25 November 2013 by David Fleming

ISM Takeover Day

On Friday I had the pleasure of attending two debates by schoolchildren at the International Slavery Museum (ISM) as part of the Children’s Commissioner’s Takeover Day. It was also the occasion of the launch of the ISM’s new Teachers’ Guide to the Legacies of Transatlantic Slavery. Read more…

New Legacies sessions for schools

13 November 2013 by Mitty

Image of a teachers' guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

Teachers’ guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

We’re officially launching a new session for schools. It focuses on the legacies of transatlantic slavery and is designed for key stage 3 and 4 students. It has been a while in the making and has been a real challenge to do but I’m really pleased with the outcome and how the session has shaped up.

Read more…

If walls could talk…

17 October 2013 by Richard

clip_image002

Barbican Estate, London

Hello, First of all, please do check out our diverse list of Black History Month activities including several related to our most recent exhibition British dance: Black routes. Read more…

Black History Month is about the incredible impact of the Black diaspora on the world

11 October 2013 by Mitty

Elroy Josephz dancing

The story of influential dancer Elroy Josephz is explored in the exhibition ‘British dance: Black routes’. Image © Elroy Josephz archive, courtesy of Sue Lancaster and Steve Mulrooney

Black History Month, which we celebrate every October, is always a particularly busy time at the International Slavery Museum, and in the education team we are even busier! My untidy desk is proof of this.

Black History Month is great as it brings people to the museum who may not have had a chance to learn much about Black history before. Black history isn’t just about Transatlantic slavery but also the incredible impact people of the Black diaspora have had on the world.

Black heritage plays such an integral part in shaping Britain as we know it and I think that’s why it’s such an important month.

A part of me wishes that there wasn’t the need for Black History Month, that it could just be seen as part of British history. But with proposed plans recently (though these have now been revised) to take key Black historical figures from the national curriculum I think it’s ever more pressing that we celebrate October. Read more…

Liverpool, World Heritage Site

11 October 2013 by David Fleming

Merseyside Maritime Museum on sunny day with boats in dock

There is much activity surrounding Liverpool’s World Heritage Site status at the moment. For those of you who have missed it, much of Liverpool city centre has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, in recognition of the city’s remarkable wealth of buildings and structures that relate to the period when Liverpool was the premier port in the British Empire. This means that Liverpool’s heritage is ranked alongside the cities of Bruges, Prague and Salzburg and other celebrated heritage sites around the world such as Angkor Wat temple complex and the Taj Mahal – there are 981 in all, 28 of them in the UK. Read more…

All the World is Now Richer

16 September 2013 by Zachary

steel sculpture of six standing figures

All the World is Now Richer

This month Sokari Douglas Camp is exhibiting her series of six powerful welded steel sculpture at St Georges Hall just a stone’s throw from World Museum Liverpool. The exhibition, titled  All the World is Now Richer, has been installed in the Dickens & Gladstone Gallery and is a fitting commemoration for the abolition of slavery. Sokari’s steel figures stand strong and erect. They are modelled on people she remembers but they were inspired by a well known quotation from William Prescott, a former slave in the United States:

“They will remember that we were sold but they won’t remember that we were strong. They will remember that we were bought but not that we were brave”.

Read more…

New exhibition celebrating Black British dancers

6 September 2013 by Lucy Johnson

A dancer from the Jiving Lindy Hoppers performing at the Merseyside Maritime Museum

This week we have been taking down Oil Boom, Delta burns: photographs by George Osodi at the International Slavery Museum. It’s always sad to see a display close, but also a chance to put up an exciting, new exhibition! Read more…