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Posts tagged with 'international slavery museum'

African tales and crafts

21 March 2013 by Andrew

illustration on book cover of Anansi the spider and its dutchy pot

Anansi the greedy spider and dutchy pot.

Come along to the International Slavery Museum next week and hear author Elayne Ogbeta read from her book ‘Anansi & the Dutchy Pot’.

Greedy Anansi loves his food so much and gets himself into trouble in this entertaining introduction to the Anansi series.  Anansi and the Dutchy Pot is an inspiring Caribbean folklore tale re-told for the younger generation. After storytelling, why not take part in our Anansi craft session?

Read more…

Back on the road

18 March 2013 by Richard

The Chapman Family Collection in Tate Britain

Objects from the collection of artists Jake and Dinos Chapman.

Hello,

I was in London recently for a series of meetings. I usually have a few hours to kill before getting the train back so I often have a bit of a busman’s holiday, checking out a new exhibition or snooping around some gallery.  I always seem to end up frantically rushing back to Euston in rush hour too.  This trip was no different and although I like to think I’m an experienced visitor to the capital at one stage I had to ask a postman, a shop assistant in Liberty’s, and two bobbies where the nearest tube station was.
Read more…

Our most successful year ever

12 March 2013 by Sam

people around a big cake

The Museum of Liverpool’s first birthday celebration in July was just one of the events that brought in crowds in 2012

Museums in Liverpool are the most popular in England outside London, according to the 2012 visitor figures issued by the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions (ALVA).The Museum of Liverpool attracted more than 1 million visitors, and was the most visited museum in England, outside of London.

This wasn’t the only success story though. The number of visitors to the Walker Art Gallery increased by 40%, mainly due to the popular exhibition ‘Rolf Harris: Can you tell what it is yet?’ The International Slavery Museum saw a 9% increase and visitor numbers to the Lady Lever Art Gallery increased by 7%. Read more…

Appeal for old football shirts

12 March 2013 by Sam

group of smiling young people

Young people who trained in Capoeira with Daniel on his last visit to Brazil

Here’s an appeal from Vikky Evans Hubbard at the International Slavery Museum:

“Daniel Baird, who runs our fabulous Capoeira Club on Saturday mornings, is off to train in Brazil soon. While he is there he works with groups of young people in the favelas, helping his ‘Mestre’ (master or trainer) train them in Capoeira.

Capoeira teaches discipline, self respect and respect for others as well as elements of self defence, dance, music and African Brazilian cultural identity and is a powerful tool in the fight to keep young people of the favelas off the streets and way from drugs and crime.

Daniel will be visiting a group he has previously trained in the Quinta de Boa Vista e Lapa favela in West Rio and would like to take some gifts for the kids in the ghetto there. Read more…

International Women’s Day events – Museums

7 March 2013 by Louise

Image of a sculpture of a suffragette

Visit the Museum of Liverpool to hear a talk about the Suffragettes

This Friday is the annual International Women’s Day (IWD). The day has been observed since the early 1900s but has grown in significance more recently and is now recognised across the world. Interestingly, in many countries including Cuba, Kazakhstan, Ukraine and Zambia, IWD is an annual holiday which sees men honouring women that they know with various small gifts and flowers. It’s a day that puts women’s rights and achievements on the map.

You may be thinking that women have gained equality and that attitudes have shifted over the past century, and to an extent, you’d be right. However, women remain underrepresented in business and politics, are paid less than men, and globally women’s education, access to healthcare, and violence against them is worse than that of men. IWD draws attention to these differences. Read more…

Republic Day in the Land of Many Waters

22 February 2013 by Richard

Guyana flag

The image shows the colourful Guyana flag

Hello,

First of all I would like to wish members of the global Guyanese family a Happy Republic Day for tomorrow.  On 23 February 1970 the Forbes Burnham led government proclaimed Guyana, The Co-operative Republic of Guyana and ended Guyana’s constitutional tie to Britain. Guyana though remains a member of the Commonwealth.

The birth of Guyana as a republic is now also closely associated with the annual Mashramani festival or ‘Mash day’, derived from the Amerindian language which according to the Guyanese Ministry of Culture, Youth & Sport means ‘the celebration of a job well done’. The festival has a carnival atmosphere and is one of the most spectacular annual celebrations in Guyana. Read more…

‘The Stowaway’

15 February 2013 by Sam

young actors dressed in Victorian costume

Over the last three months the International Slavery Museum education team have been working with a group of young actors from the Street Life Foundation. The group used the painting by William Windus, ‘The Black Boy’, on display in the International Slavery Museum, as the starting point for a new play ‘The Stowaway’ written by group leader, Caroline Ihiekwe.

As part of their research the group worked closely with the education teams at the Maritime Museum and Museum of Liverpool, to find out what everyday life was like in Victorian Liverpool and how it affected children and young people of all classes. Mark, a member of the Street Life acting team, tells us more: Read more…

Breaking the heart of darkness

14 February 2013 by Richard

Hello all,

Conrad’s classic Heart of Darkness is a powerful indictment of imperialism at its height which swept across Africa and in particular the repressive and brutal reign of the Belgians in the Congo, which had become the fiefdom of King Leopold II. The book centres on Marlow, a sailor who works for a Belgian ivory trading company, and encounters widespread brutality by the company. At the end of the book Conrad’s narrator encounters Kurtz (Brando in Apocalypse Now), who had worked for the company but turned himself into a demigod and who was guilty of carrying out horrifying atrocities. Read more…

E-footprints

31 January 2013 by Richard

group photo in the museum

Beverley Knight, Nicola Green, Richard Benjamin and David Lammy MP

Hello all,

Unfortunately we had to cancel the planned event with the artist Nicola Green at the Walker Art Gallery on Friday 18th due to the bad weather. However, before the venues closed I was able to give Nicola and her friends and family a tour of the International Slavery Museum. Amongst the group was the singer Beverley Knight who had a very thought provoking visit and David Lammy MP – long time supporter of the International Slavery Museum. It’s a lot to take in for some people on their initial visit, and they might experience a number of emotions, so I am sure that many of the group will come back in the future. Read more…

Radical Resolutions

15 January 2013 by Richard

Bronze bust of W.E.B Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois was an American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author and editor.

Hello all,
Happy New Year to regular and new followers of my blog.  New Years resolutions are often doomed before they even start and as a pragmatist I don’t expect the world to change at the chimes of Big Ben. That said it would be a positive start to 2013 if people with dispositions towards intolerance educate themselves about “others” and denounce their particular prejudice, racism, sexism, ageism, their homophobia or hostility towards disabled people – to name just a few – rather than make a resolution to eat less cake or exercise more.   Regardless, those of us who abhor such behaviour should not be downhearted, stay resolute and when we can, question, challenge and inform. Read more…

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.