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Posts tagged with 'LGBT+'

Tales from the city – captivating stories from the LGBT+ community

27 July 2018 by Andrew Bullock

Image ow two women kissing, with a Liverpool skyline underneath them and a rainbow in the background.

Tales from the city

We are marking this Liverpool Pride weekend with a blog from Marianna Gould. Marianna is studying Communication and Media at the University of Liverpool and was moved when she visited our Tales from the city exhibition:  Read more…

Telling her story – Melanie Robson

26 July 2018 by Kay

Within the Tales from the city exhibition we have a special display case which enables us to tell different people’s stories through objects that are meaningful to them.

Our current display features items kindly loaned by Melanie Robson. Melanie is a retired teacher who lives in Bootle. Her precious items represent her life as a transwoman. Read more…

Museum Dance Off – we need your votes!

18 April 2018 by Matt

Face in cut out

Museum of Liverpool’s Museum Dance Off entry 2018 was inspired by exhibition, Tales from the city.

The education team at the Museum of Liverpool have always held a secret talent for dance (honest!). Read more…

‘Frontstage and backstage at the Magic Clock, Easter lunchtime 1969’

12 March 2018 by Kay

pub in a city street

The Magic Clock, Roe Street, 1968. Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office, Liverpool Libraries.

Dr Jo Stanley, creative historian, made a textile artwork of the interior of the Magic Clock pub, Roe Street, Liverpool, especially for our Tales from the city exhibition. Jo, originally from Crosby, was a barmaid at the pub, over Christmas 1968 and Easter 1969, in vacations from teacher training college.

The Magic Clock was popular with gay men. It was situated in Liverpool’s original ‘gay quarter’ around Queen Square. Read more…

A proposal with Pride!

2 March 2018 by Kay

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

We have recently added some fantastic new items to our community case in the Tales from the city exhibition. This case enables us to reveal LGBT+ stories not represented in the exhibition, which people contact us about and would like to share.

The items were very kindly loaned by Emma and Ann Miller-McCaffrey and tell the story of their relationship.  Read more…

A little history of LGBT+ love

14 February 2018 by Scott Smith

Love between LGBT+ people has existed throughout the whole of history, and our own collections testify to that fact. Here we’ve taken the opportunity to highlight some historical LGBT+ relationships that we think you should know about.

The artworks and objects discussed here are part of National Museums Liverpool’s collections and all relate in some way to intimate relationships between members of the same sex, both real and fictional, which go beyond platonic friendship in some way. All of these partnerships offer, in their own way, an alternative to the type of heterosexual relationship that continues to be socially dominant. Read more…

Sapphic Suffragettes

31 January 2018 by Kay

Hilary McCollum

Courtesy of Hilary McCollum

Our final blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Hilary McCollum.

Hilary is a feminist activist, writer and campaigner from northwest Ireland. She will be presenting, ‘Sapphic Suffragettes: The key role of lesbians in the fight for Votes for Women’.  Read more…

William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’

29 January 2018 by Kay

Billie-Gina Thomason in front of a board with 'Prisoners' written at the top

Courtesy of Billie-Gina Thomason

Our seventh blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Billie-Gina Thomason.

Billie-Gina, who is a Phd student at Liverpool John Moores University, will be presenting, ‘William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’ from Liverpool’.

She tells us more –

“My talk explores the life of an individual named William Seymour, who lived most of his life as a man. William’s biological identity was revealed after he was arrested and subsequently he chose to be put on trial as ‘Mary Honeywell’, his married female name. Read more…

The Pansy Project – OUTing the past

24 January 2018 by Kay

two men at a flower bed, one in police uniform

Paul Harfleet planting pansies in St John’s Gardens, Liverpool with a representative of Merseyside Police © Paul Harfleet

Our sixth blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Paul Harfleet.

Paul is an artist who plants pansies at the sites of homophobia, including here in Liverpool, as part of The Pansy Project.

He tells us more –

“I began The Pansy Project 13 years ago in Manchester, since then I have travelled the world planting pansies at the sites of homophobia; from London, Liverpool, Paris, Istanbul and New York. Each pansy is documented in its location and then added to my website. This anecdotal geography of homophobia creates a fascinating narrative through the experience of homophobia. Read more…

Trans Atlantic Militaries : LGBTQ rights

22 January 2018 by Kay

Caroline Paige in Royal Air Force uniform at the door of number 10

Caroline outside of 10 Downing Street, 2012. Courtesy of Caroline Paige.

Our fifth blog post for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Caroline Paige.

Caroline, who was the first openly transgender officer in the British Armed Forces, will be exploring ‘Trans Atlantic militaries; how the UK showed the way and the USA lost it; and the implications for LGBTQ rights’. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.