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These are a few of my favourite things – 2

13 March 2012 by Laura C

Here, Laura Cox, Visitor Assistant at the Museum of Liverpool shares the next of her favourite things.


Laura stands next to the Punch and Judy show

Laura at the Museum of Liverpool life, by the Punch and Judy display

My second favourite object in the Museum of Liverpool is situated in the Wondrous Place galley, it’s a whole case dedicated to Codman’s Punch and Judy. The case contains a Punch, a Judy, a Crocodile and perhaps even a sneaky clown who goes by the name of Joey.

The family run Codman’s Punch and Judy show used to take place at Lime Street and then later at Williamson Square, pictures around the case show crowds of people watching a show. These shows were way before my time, we’re talking the 1800′s here, so you may be wondering why it’s one of my favourite things in the museum… Well, Codman’s Punch and Judy holds a very special place in my heart and as soon as I set eyes on it in the new museum the memories came flooding back. Read more…

Liverpool’s Chinese Family Tree

30 June 2011 by Lucy

How much do you know about your parents and grandparents?

Bernie, Denise and Sun Yui worked with us to find out more about their families who feature in a new interactive Family Tree displayed in East meets west – The Story of Shanghai and Liverpool, part of the new Museum of Liverpool opening on July 19th.

Copies of marriage certificates, passenger lists and trade directories have been put together in a visual log that will provide visitors with plenty of ideas on how to track down family members past and present. These personal stories took us to archives in Shanghai where researchers tried to trace the participants’ Grandfathers – Sow Loo, Ching Ming and Leung Ngau. Read more…

Scout’s Honour

18 May 2011 by Lucy

Ever wondered who spotted the likes of Keegan, Toshack and Hansen and brought them to Liverpool?

Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley are rightly credited for turning Liverpool Football Club into a winning side during the 1960s, 70s and 80s, but few people know about the major role played by Geoff Twentyman, the club’s chief scout from 1967 to 1985.

A former Anfield player, Twentyman was recruited into the boot room team by Shankly and went on to unearth a host of world-famous stars that helped to maintain the Reds’ position as one of Europe’s greatest teams during a glittering era that saw them claim the Football League championship 18 times. Read more…

Liverpool’s Chinese community during the Blitz

4 May 2011 by Lucy

Francesca Aiken, Assistant Exhibition Curator for the Global City Gallery in the new Museum of Liverpool writes:


Seventy years since the May Blitz, the spirit of Pitt Street lives on.

 

Seventy years ago this month, a devastating aerial bombardment struck Liverpool, ending lives, demolishing homes and displacing whole communities. It is in tribute to “the spirit of an unconquered people” that Liverpool’s Anglo-Chinese community were part of the effort to keep calm and carry on, piecing back together not just buildings but homes and livelihoods.

Pitt Street, 1915, shaped by tall converted warehouse buildings and cobbled streets, stretches out under the constant watch of St Michaels Church spire, busy with dozens of Chinese businesses, from boarding houses to grocers and tobacconists. This was the birthplace of Liverpool’s Chinese community, the destination for seamen from all over the world including Spain, the Philippines, Italy, the West Indies and Scandinavia – to name just a few. To the people who lived and grew up there, this was ‘world’s end.’ Pitt Street was the place to go, bustling with shops and cafes all within easy reach of the docks. Kwong Shang Lung was one of the city’s earliest grocers to specialise in Chinese food, trading from 1915 until the bombs fell in 1941. Read more…

Wait a minute Mr Postman…

8 April 2011 by Lucy

The Press Office volunteer Jack Poland has spotted a good story again. Here he tells us more about the child-sized post box that’s in our collections:


Fazakerley Cottage Homes were opened in 1889 to accommodate poor and orphaned children, housing up to 584 children at a time. In addition to the 21 cottages where the children lived, there were schools, farm buildings, gardens and a swimming pool. The homes also introduced another unique addition, which, after plans to install it in the Museum of Liverpool were revealed, has roused a fair amount of intrigue.

The object of interest is a child-sized post box which was specially made for the children to post their letters and cards. It was used up until the Homes’ closure in 1964 when it was thankfully rescued by a member of the Post Office staff and kindly donated to National Museums Liverpool.

Fazakerley Children's Home Post Box

This is the post box which children at the Fazakerley Cottage Homes used to post their letters. (c) Mark McNulty

Curator of community history Kay Jones attended the Fazakerley Cottage Homes Association annual re-unions in June 2009 and 2010 to find out more about this intriguing piece of local history. Read more…

Where has my father gone?

21 March 2011 by Lucy

Francesca Aiken, assistant exhibition curator for the Museum of Liverpool’s Global City Gallery writes:


David Yip

David Yip narrated ‘Where has my father gone?’ for East meets West – The Story of Shanghai and Liverpool. With special thanks to David Yip and Lisa O’Neil for providing these images.

“How could it happen? How could I not know about this?” was David Yip’s response when he heard for the first time about the enforced repatriation of hundreds of seamen from Liverpool’s Chinese community that took place in 1946.

For many of those directly affected, the wives and children of Chinese seamen who worked for the Merchant Navy during the Second World War, the truth about their sudden disappearance wasn’t known until decades later – many thought they had been abandoned. Now, 65 years later, more and more are discovering the truth. Read more…

Holding History

28 February 2011 by Lucy

The Museum of Liverpool education team is currently trying to track down a number of objects they can use as handling resources for learning sessions when the new museum opens.

Visitors touching a historical object

If you think you could help us track down one of the objects we require for handling sessions like this one, please let us know

Being able to touch and feel an object is a great way of bringing history to life for visitors, and if you think you can help provide us with any of the objects listed below, then please get in touch.

The list of objects required is as follows:
• Liverpool-made toys
• Victorian metal bucket and spade set
• Vintage Union Jack flag
• Opera glasses
• Top hat
• Items linked to imports and exports from Liverpool history – clay pipes, locally made clocks and watches, Herculaneum pottery, tea chests with Liverpool links.
• First World War or home front items linked to Liverpool such as postcards, mementos or photographs
• Carpet bag
• 19th Century Italian lire
• Victorian Knife sharpening equipment or tailoring equipment
• Items related to the Liverpool Overhead Railway
• Docker’s Hook
• Original Beatles records
• 1950s or 1960s transistor radio and TV
• 1960s primary or secondary school text books
• Old-style school desk  – wooden with inkwell
• 1960s Afghan coat Read more…

Pitt Street remembered at Waterfront event

5 November 2010 by Lucy

Thirty two members of the St Michael in the City Church Group attended an event at the Maritime Museum this week to mark the close of six months of fact-finding in partnership with the Museum of Liverpool Global City gallery team.

Attending the event were those who grew up around Pitt Street and Cleveland Square, whole streets that were flattened in the May Blitz of World War Two. This area was once a hub of activity for Seamen from all over the world, their families part of a vibrant community that would form the foundations of Liverpool’s Chinatown as its known today. Read more…

Are you red, or are you blue?

12 October 2010 by Lucy

Are you red or are you blue? This is one of the big questions we ask in our football immersive experience Kicking and Screaming in the new Museum of Liverpool. The film celebrates and explores the city’s passion for football and takes the visitor on a journey through all the key moments that have shaped it.

Men leaving Sandon pub

A scene being filmed outside the Sandon pub in Anfield, for the football immersive in the new Museum of Liverpool

For the past few weeks production company Centre Screen have been out and about in Liverpool with museum curators and Creative Director Roy Boulter, filming some of the big scenes. Read more…

1984 – We need your help!

5 October 2010 by Lucy

The Museum of Liverpool is due to open next summer, 2011, and curators need your help!

One of the star features of the new museum will be an immersive film, taking visitors right into the heart of the city’s passion for football, exploring our unique connections to the game.

We are currently in the process of filming sequences for the film, and in order for it to be as authentic as possible, we need to borrow certain things. Read more…