150th anniversary of Mimosa’s emigrant voyage

28 May 2015 by Ellie

Group photograph of Welsh settlers

Settlers in Patagonia, 28 July 1890, including some Mimosa emigrants. Image courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, Bangor University, John Murray Thomas Collection

In our Emigrants to a New World gallery at Merseyside Maritime Museum, we tell the story of the millions of people who left Europe in the 19th and early 20th centuries in search of better lives overseas, with Liverpool being the departure point for many.

Large numbers of Welsh emigrants sailed from Liverpool, mostly settling in the United States of America. With the next generation, concerns were raised about that fact that the Welsh language was no longer being spoken and traditions were being forgotten. Read more…

Be dazzled in half term

27 May 2015 by Jen

Carved ship before painting

A work in progress…

Are you stuck for something to do with the kids this half term?  You could take a trip on the Mersey ferry Snowdrop on 27-31 May, which has been transformed with a fantastic dazzle inspired artwork designed by Sir Peter Blake.  Dazzle was a scheme created in the First World War which saw Allied ships painted in outlandish designs to make them more difficult to target by enemy U-boats. Read more…

Border Force family fun days

25 May 2015 by Alison

Sniffer dog at work

Seized! is a permanent gallery situated in the Merseyside Maritime Museum at the Albert Dock Liverpool. The gallery explores the mysterious world of smuggling and the way in which the Border Force protects society against harms caused by this illegal activity. Read more…

One magnificent weekend with National Museums Liverpool

22 May 2015 by Andrew

Visitors enjoy the view of the Pier Head from the Museum of Liverpool

Enjoy One Magnificent View from the People’s Republic

Celebrate the arrival of the Three Cunard Queens this bank holiday at our waterfront venues, Merseyside Maritime Museum and the Museum of LiverpoolRead more…

Lusitania: cost overruns and teething troubles

20 May 2015 by Sarah

The Lusitania stands on the ways nearly ready for launch. J. Kent Layton Collection

The Lusitania stands on the ways nearly ready for launch. J. Kent Layton Collection

This blog post is the third in a series written by maritime historian and author J Kent Layton, the author of ‘Lusitania: an illustrated biography’, to accompany the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss, legacy:

“Over the years, I have tried to ‘fill in the blanks’ in the Lusitania’s history. One of the most fascinating things about the construction of the Lusitania and Mauretania is that not everything went according to plan. Read more…

Recognition for those who served on WWII Arctic Convoys

18 May 2015 by Jen

Brenda Shackleton holding her Father's Artic Star

Brenda Shackleton holding her Father’s Arctic Star.  Image courtesy of Brenda Shackleton.

Last December I blogged about Brenda Shackleton’s fight for greater recognition of the remarkable story of the Merchant Navy Rescue ships and their vital contribution to the Second World War. Men of the Merchant Navy, including Brenda’s father Bill Hartley, crewed these small coastal vessels following the Allied convoys from 1940 onwards, with the sole purpose of rescuing survivors should any of the ships be torpedoed. It was a dangerous and difficult task but their actions succeeded in saving the lives of 4194 men throughout the Second World War.

The ships on all the convoys suffered high risks and terrible losses but there was one particular convoy route described by Churchill himself as:

“The worst journey in the world.”

Read more…

Lusitania: an engineering triumph

15 May 2015 by Sam Vaux

Ship painting

Contrary to popular opinion, the decision in favor of turbines on the Lusitania and Mauretania had nothing to do with the success of the Carmania over her sister Caronia, pictured here. (J. Kent Layton Collection)

This blog post is the second in a series written by maritime historian and author J Kent Layton, the author of ‘Lusitania: an illustrated biography’, to accompany the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss, legacy:

“In order to propel the Lusitania at an unprecedented 25 knots, it was clear that something unique was going to be required in the design of her powerplant. Read more…

Cunard Staff display

11 May 2015 by Sarah Starkey

Image of a ticket for a Cunard Staff Dinner, Liverpool, 1924

Ticket for the 26th Cunard Staff Dinner, 1924 (reference DX/1851 part of)

In honour of this year’s 175th anniversary of the first Cunard sailing from Liverpool, we’ve changed the display outside the Maritime Archives and Library on the second floor of the Merseyside Maritime Museum. Read more…

Remembering the Lusitania on the 100th anniversary

7 May 2015 by Sam

Ellie signing a large picture of the Lusiitania

A signature canvas commemorating the Lusitania will be a ‘living’ work of art. Lustania exhibition curator Ellie Moffat was one of the first to sign it.

Every year Merseyside Maritime Museum pays tribute to the 1,191 people who lost their lives on the Lusitania, with a commemoration by the ship’s propeller on the quayside on 7 May, the anniversary of the sinking. The event brings together many of families affected by the loss of the Lusitania, reflecting what a huge impact the tragedy had on Liverpool, where most of the crew were based.

We have been working closely with many of the Lusitania families, particularly over the last year in preparation for the major exhibition Lusitania: life, loss, legacy. I was fortunate to meet some of them at the opening of the exhibition and was moved to see their pride in how their relatives’ stories had been portrayed. Read more…

Lusitania – to save the company

5 May 2015 by Sam

painting of an ocean liner

The German liner Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse of 1897 © J Kent Layton Collection

This week we are marking the centenary of the sinking of the Lusitania with a series of events, including a memorial service at Liverpool Parish church and a commemoration at the Lusitania propeller on the waterfront on Thursday 7 May. See our Lusitania events page for full details.

To explain why the loss of the Lusitania was such a significant event, J Kent Layton – maritime historian and author of ‘Lusitania: an illustrated biography’ – has written a series of blog posts about the history of the ship. Read more…

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