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How social justice is key work of museums – new video and blog

5 February 2014 by Dickie

A man stood at with microphone speaking in front of SJAM logo

Dr David Fleming at the launch of the Social Justice Alliance for Museums

Watch our new video which highlights the work of The Social Justice Alliance for Museums (SJAM). Here, on our blog, one of SJAM’s founder members explains why social justice is key work of museums.

Read more…

Museums modernus

24 July 2012 by Richard

At the end of May I left these shores to give a public lecture in Copenhagen as part of the MeLa European Museums in an age of migrations project. MeLa is a four year long research project which aims to define new approaches for museums in relation to the conditions posed by the migrations of people, cultures, ideas, information and knowledge in the global world. Furthermore, the project will evaluate how these changes can interfere with such organizational issues as communication strategies, physical structures and exhibition places. I was invited by the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CIID) who organized this particular event and who presented some very interesting and innovative design solutions focusing on visitor studies. Read more…

Tell us what you love about Wirral!

28 September 2011 by Lisa

Christopher Howse from The Telegraph recently enjoyed a visit to Wirral, guided by an updated edition of Nikolaus Pevsner’s architectural guide to Cheshire. He gave the picturesque Port Sunlight village and the Lady Lever Art Gallery a glowing review. You can read the full article here.  

Here’s our own Marketing Officer Ann Flenley to tell us why she loves Wirral and why you should too!


Lady Lever Art Gallery

Lady Lever Art Gallery

I love Wirral. It’s a relatively undiscovered gem that lies between Liverpool, Chester and North Wales with sandy beaches, endless countryside and golf courses. It really is great place for day trips and family fun in the north west. 

In addition to our own Lady Lever Art Gallery there is plenty to discover, such as Port Sunlight Museum in the same village as the gallery. I also enjoy the odd visit to Church Farm, which is an organic family run farm offering tantalising treats and endless activities to entertain the children.   Read more…

The power of images

2 August 2011 by Richard

woman looking at framed photographs

Visitor at the Living Apart exhibition

Hello

Well there have been plenty of things happening here at the museum since my last blog post. We have launched three very successful and eclectic exhibitions: Living Apart: photographs of apartheid by Ian Berry; ’42′ Women of Sierra Leone, a series of photographs of Sierra Leonean women, highlighting the alarming fact that life expectancy for them is only 42 and Toxteth 1981, a community exhibition developed in collaboration with the Merseyside Black History Month Group to mark the 30th anniversary in July 2011 of the 1981 riots in Toxteth, Liverpool. The latter involved members of the Liverpool Black community who lived in Toxteth during the disturbances loaning photographic material for the exhibition. The images gave them a voice which I believe is very important if museums are to be truly seen as a resource by the local community in particular. Read more…

A visitor from Easter Island

16 May 2011 by Lisa

We’ve just got some news that a mysterious visitor will soon be arriving at World Museum! Here’s our Curator of Oceanic Collections, Lynne Heidi Stumpe, to tell us about him…


Dark grey stone statue of a head and torso.

Image courtesy and copyright Trustees of the British Museum

An interesting new visitor is arriving at World Museum this evening. Moai Hava is just over five feet high, weighs about two and a half tons and is a little bit rough around the edges. He comes originally from Rapa Nui (Easter Island) but has been staying at the British Museum in London for the last 142 years, along with a larger friend called Hoa Hakananai’a.

All Rapa Nui statues have individual names: ‘moai’ means ‘statue’ or ‘image’ in the Rapanui language and ‘hava’ best translates as ‘to be lost’. Moai Hava is quite a mysterious character. Most moai were carved from volcanic tuff, a relatively soft rock, have a distinctive style and were made to commemorate ancestral chiefs. Moai Hava, however, is one of the few moai made from basalt, a much harder rock and is in a slightly different style. We don’t know exactly why he was made. Read more…

Street photography in London and Liverpool

1 March 2011 by Sam

photo of a man sitting in front of mannequins

Cheshire Street, E2, 1986 © Paul Trevor. All rights reserved.

There seems to have been an explosion of interest in street photography in recent years. The ease and convenience of digital photography has meant that anyone can snap candid shots and share them on social media. However the Museum of London’s rather excellent London Street Photography exhibition shows that it isn’t a recent phenomena. The exhibition includes photos dating back 150 years.

The Victorians it seems were just as interested in documenting life around them as we are now. I perhaps shouldn’t have been surprised to have seen so many incredibly fresh shots by John Thomson – he was after all the photographer responsible for my favourite exhibition of last year, China through the lens 1868-1872 at the Maritime Museum. A pioneering photojournalist, his scenes such as the encounter between ‘Hookey Alf’ and a young girl are bursting with life and characters. There are also some remarkable shots by unknown amateur photographers on show, taken from albums in the museum’s collection. Read more…

King of bling, Tutankhamun! Win a family ticket …

3 December 2010 by Dawn

While Dinomania is sweeping Liverpool, at the other end of the motorway Manchester is set for an acute attack of mummy-mania. The Museum of Museums (adjacent to the Trafford Centre) has unveiled its biggest exhibition, Tutankhamun – His Tomb and His Treasures, and is about to launch a series of family fun days.

The exhibition features over 1000 replicas of the treasures discovered in the tomb of the famous Pharaoh, recreating the splendour of the chamber as discovered by Howard Carter.  It’s an interesting approach from a visitor perspective because the replica objects are seen ‘in situ’. This is something that cannot even experienced in the Valley of the Kings, because the treasures have been removed and are safely stored in Cairo Museum. Read more…

Catalan visit

22 November 2010 by Sarah

people looking at document

Last week the Maritime Archives & Library had a visit from staff from a number of maritime museums in Catalonia.  The Barcelona Maritime Museum, which, it pains me to say, is in an historic building even more impressive than ours, is thinking of setting up an archive facility with public access and so came to look at our stores and public searchroom.  Needless to say they arrived on a classic Albert Dock day of driving rain and grey skies, but we wouldn’t want the British obsession with the weather to be undermined with a nice sunny day.

On their own – Britain’s child migrants

9 November 2010 by Sam

archive photo of 4 young children carrying suitcases

Four children bound for Fairbridge Farm School, Molong 1938. Reproduced courtesy of Molong Historical Society.

This week two museums at opposite ends of the world are unveiling the results of a major collaborative project about child migration schemes from Britain to the Commonwealth. Curator Ellie Moffat from the Merseyside Maritime Museum explains:


“Over the last couple of years we have been developing an exhibition in partnership with the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) in Sydney. Tomorrow that exhibition, ‘On their own – Britain’s child migrants‘, opens at ANMM.

ANMM approached us a few years ago about collaborating on a project looking at the history of Britain’s child migrants, and this exhibition is the culmination of that work. The partnership has been very productive and engaging – if sometimes challenging due to the distance and time differences!

‘On their own – Britain’s child migrants’ traces the history of child migration schemes, concentrating on the mass migration movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. It will be on display at ANMM until May 2011, before touring other venues across Australia. The original plan had been for the exhibition to come to Merseyside Maritime Museum next November and then tour the UK. However due to central government cuts to our funding we have been forced to cancel plans for hosting the exhibition. Read more…

Art Merseywide showcases local talent

22 September 2010 by Sam

people discussing paintings on a gallery wall

Olwen McLaughlin, Editions Gallery, Liverpool, Louise Hesketh (Halton) and Chris Kerfoot (National Museums Liverpool) selecting works at the Wirral Spring exhibition, Williamson Art Gallery, Birkenhead

While the Biennial attract artists from all over the world to exhibit in Liverpool, the next exhibition to open at the National Conservation Centre on Friday, Art Merseywide, gives talented local artists the opportunity to show their work. With artworks selected from open exhibitions held in Liverpool, Halton, Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton and Wirral over the last year, Art Merseywide gives what exhibition organiser Louise Hesketh, of the Brindley Theatre and Arts Centre in Runcorn, describes as “a candid snapshot of the thriving local art scene”. Read more…