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Win a mounted print of the RMS Olympic ship!

10 April 2012 by Lisa

RMS Olympic ship

White star liner Olympic – sister of Titanic – looking aft (1920). Reproduced by permission of English Heritage: BL24990/021

To commemorate the Titanic centenary, we’re offering you the chance to win an A3 mounted print of either Titanic’s sister ship RMS Olympic or the White Star Line’s Liverpool offices! 

One runner up will receive a copy of ‘Titanic and Liverpool’ by Alan Scarth and a photography book which accompanies our current exhibition at the Lady Lever Art Gallery.

To enter, you need to answer this question:

Which photographer(s) were commissioned by the White Star Line to photograph RMS Olympic in 1920?  Read more…

Fighting for change

14 February 2012 by Sam

photographer in her studio

Rebecca Kamara in her studio. Copyright Lee Karen Stow

Last year photographer Lee Karen Stow launched her exhibition ’42’ Women of Sierra Leone at the International Slavery Museum, with the help of her former student Rebecca Kamara, who is one of the 42 women featured in the exhibition. At the opening events Rebecca spoke about how the photography workshops that Lee taught in Sierra Leone have inspired her to earn a living as a photographer. She has faced huge challenges, as she lives in a rural village and didn’t even have any electricity at home until recently – something that photographers in the UK take for granted to charge camera batteries and run their computers!

Lee returned to Liverpool last week to add some new photos to her exhibition. Rebecca couldn’t join her this time, but Lee visited her in Sierra Leone in September and took the photograph above, which should bring a smile to the face of anyone who met her last year. As you can see, Rebecca has built her own photo studio, with help from UK and US donations and support, but also through her own photography business and photographic sales. She has now also set up a women’s photography group in the village. Read more…

Volunteer blog: photography fun!

27 January 2012 by Lisa

It’s great to hear that volunteering at National Museums Liverpool can really be a memorable experience for those involved. Here’s a blog by a recent volunteer who helped out in our Photography and Decorative Art departments…


Adrian in the Decorative Arts store

Adrian in the Decorative Arts store

My name is Adrian Foo-Gibney and for the last two weeks I have been on a Year 10 work placement with National Museums Liverpool. During my time here I have learnt many skills, ranging from hands-on skills like photography to communication skills. This was a great experience for me as I got along with all the members of staff and had fun as well as learning. Everyone was really friendly and made me feel comfortable.

During my first week in Photography I worked with David Flower. He taught me many skills and gave me lots of tips about photography. The things I learnt were really useful, as back in school I have taken the GCSE photography course. It will also help with my personal photographic skills.

I was given many jobs during the first week, including photographing hats, processing images and scanning negatives ready for editing.

In the second week I worked with Alyson Pollard in Decorative Arts where I got to work with my friend Joseph Evans who is also from my school, Calderstones. We worked together photographing men’s hats and suits and inputted all the data for them.

I have enjoyed my time working with the National Museums Liverpool and it was a privilege to be here. I would like to do a similar job when I leave school. This has been an amazing adventure for me and I will remember this placement for ages. Read more…

The power of images

2 August 2011 by Richard

woman looking at framed photographs

Visitor at the Living Apart exhibition

Hello

Well there have been plenty of things happening here at the museum since my last blog post. We have launched three very successful and eclectic exhibitions: Living Apart: photographs of apartheid by Ian Berry; ’42’ Women of Sierra Leone, a series of photographs of Sierra Leonean women, highlighting the alarming fact that life expectancy for them is only 42 and Toxteth 1981, a community exhibition developed in collaboration with the Merseyside Black History Month Group to mark the 30th anniversary in July 2011 of the 1981 riots in Toxteth, Liverpool. The latter involved members of the Liverpool Black community who lived in Toxteth during the disturbances loaning photographic material for the exhibition. The images gave them a voice which I believe is very important if museums are to be truly seen as a resource by the local community in particular. Read more…

Ian Berry in conversation

6 June 2011 by Sam

As part of the Look11 photography festival there has just been a big weekend of Magnum events at the International Slavery Museum. The Magnum Professional Practice course attracted photographers from across the country for two intense days of inspiring talks.

Magnum photographer Ian Berry, whose Living Apart exhibition is currently at the museum, arrived early on Friday evening for a free ‘in conversation’ event with National Museums Liverpool’s director of art galleries Reyahn King. It was a fascinating discussion, as Reyahn describes here:
Read more…

Members enjoy sneak peek of Paul Trevor’s exhibition

23 May 2011 by Lynn

Here, Matt Dunn, Membership Officer, shares his enjoyment of Paul Trevor’s fantastic photography exhibition and talking to our members.  

Paul Trevor

Paul Trevor’s photograph in Like you’ve never been away exhibition

On Thursday 12 May we welcomed our members to the Walker Art Gallery for the first special event of the new membership year – a look at the excellent new Paul Trevor exhibition, Like you’ve never been away.

Paul’s photographs of people in inner-city Liverpool were taken over six months in 1975. They have triggered a fascinating trip down memory lane for many who have seen them and Paul has even managed to track down a number of people whose photo he took all those years ago! Read more…

Get snappy!

23 May 2011 by Lucy

Photographer Mark McNulty has been sending us some photos of the new Museum of Liverpool, from angles we haven’t seen before.

He was able to get this shot of the Museum and two of National Museums Liverpool’s historic ships in dry dock: the three-masted schooner De Wadden, and the pilot boat Edmund Gardner.

Photo of the Museum of Liverpool

Image taken by Liverpool photographer Mark McNulty of the Museum of Liverpool with De Wadden and Edmund Gardner historic ships. (c) Mark McNulty

Have you got any great pics of the Museum of Liverpool? If so, why not have a go at uploading them onto our flickr site? Read more…

It’s like he’s never been away

13 May 2011 by Sam

man standing by framed photo on the wall

Ian Boland with Paul Trevor’s photo of him and his friend in the kids’ den

Imagine what it feels like. It’s Liverpool in the mid 1970s and you and your mates are still in school. A photographer moves into the area for a few months on his first job away from London to get some pictures of the area. You’re curious about this strange man with a camera and over the months you and your community get to know and trust him, so much so that you invite him into the ‘kids’ den’ – an empty garage where you sit on old car seats and listen to records with your mates.

Over 30 years later you are invited to the Walker Art Gallery to see an exhibition featuring photographs of your old childhood friends and haunts taken by that stranger from London – who in the intervening years has become a successful photographer. Your name, your photograph and pictures of your friends are adorning the walls where great works of art, from Old Masters to the contemporary stars of the John Moores competition have previously hung.

It must be quite a lot to take in. Read more…

Ian Berry opens the Living Apart exhibition

8 April 2011 by Sam

Ian Berry in the Living Apart exhibition

Ian Berry at the opening of his exhibition

Living Apart: photographs of apartheid by Ian Berry is the latest in a strong and varied programme of exhibitions at the International Slavery Museum. It’s the venue’s second offering for the Look11 photography festival, providing a thought provoking counterpart to the insightful and uplifting ’42’ Women of Sierra Leone, which opened last month. It’s also the International Slavery Museum’s largest ever exhibition – with almost 100 photographs to fit in it has taken over the Maritime Museum’s usual exhibition space on the floor below. Read more…

Street photography in London and Liverpool

1 March 2011 by Sam

photo of a man sitting in front of mannequins

Cheshire Street, E2, 1986 © Paul Trevor. All rights reserved.

There seems to have been an explosion of interest in street photography in recent years. The ease and convenience of digital photography has meant that anyone can snap candid shots and share them on social media. However the Museum of London’s rather excellent London Street Photography exhibition shows that it isn’t a recent phenomena. The exhibition includes photos dating back 150 years.

The Victorians it seems were just as interested in documenting life around them as we are now. I perhaps shouldn’t have been surprised to have seen so many incredibly fresh shots by John Thomson – he was after all the photographer responsible for my favourite exhibition of last year, China through the lens 1868-1872 at the Maritime Museum. A pioneering photojournalist, his scenes such as the encounter between ‘Hookey Alf’ and a young girl are bursting with life and characters. There are also some remarkable shots by unknown amateur photographers on show, taken from albums in the museum’s collection. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.