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Posts tagged with 'research'

The oldest Australian night parrot

9 May 2017 by Clem Fisher

Australian Night Parrot

The Australian night parrot specimen at World Museum.

National Museums Liverpool was founded in 1851 after the bequest to the people of Liverpool of an internationally important collection of birds and mammals belonging to Edward Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby, of Knowsley Hall near Liverpool. Amongst this unique collection is a little green-and-yellow parrot…

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Osmund Bartle Wordsworth – a survivor of Lusitania

2 May 2017 by Ellie

Osmund Bartle Wordsworth in military uniform

Courtesy of The Warden and Scholars of Winchester College

As we approach the 102nd anniversary of the tragic sinking of RMS Lusitania, guest blogger Lucy London is here to tell us about her research project and how she came across a Lusitania survivor as a result:

“Since 2012 I have been researching the First World War for a series of commemorative exhibitions. I began by researching women poets and discovered quite a few poets with a link to Merseyside, for instance, May Sinclair, very famous on both sides of the Atlantic in the early 20th century, was born in Rock Ferry, Wirral. I then moved on to forgotten male poets and, again, found quite a few with links to Merseyside who were not as famous as Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon and Robert Graves.

The role of women during the First World War came next; then I added the heading ‘Fascinating Facts’, such as Rin Tin Tin the American film star dog found as a puppy in a bombed out kennels by an American soldier.

During the course of my research to commemorate 1917, I discovered a writer called Osmund Bartle Wordsworth, who was related to the poet William Wordsworth of ‘Daffodils’ fame. I was interested to discover that Merseyside Maritime Museum was looking for further information about Lusitania survivors, and Osmund was one of those.  Read more…

Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place update

23 February 2017 by Laura

Tiled shop front with decorative hoarding

Galkoff’s butcher’s shop today – behind protective hoarding. Image courtesy of LSTM

The Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project team, along with 24 volunteers have been delving into the history of this well-known Liverpool Street. The focus has been on two key heritage sites: Galkoff’s Jewish butcher shop and Watkinson Terrace, Liverpool’s last surviving example of court housing. Read more…

More Pride online!

23 February 2017 by Kay

Statuette of standing Hermaphrodite

Pride and Prejudice is our groundbreaking project to put online the social history collections held at the Museum of Liverpool, and the fine and decorative art collections at Sudley House, Walker and Lady Lever art galleries, that have an LGBT connection. We’re excited to launch the final themes today, coinciding with LGBT History Month and the OUTing the past event at the Museum of Liverpool this weekend.
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Four funerals and a wedding

26 January 2017 by Liz

view of tightly packed city centre buildings

Aerial view of Pembroke Place c1930s © Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

An amazing team of volunteers have been delving into historic archives to reveal some of the secrets of Pembroke Place as part our current project, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. And there are some very dark secrets indeed!

The annals of Liverpool reveal that the last ever duel fought in Liverpool took place in a field on the corner or Boundary Place and Pembroke Place on 20 December 1806. Major Brooks was killed by Colonel Bolton. It seems a year-long spat developed after Bolton had refused Brooks a pay rise in the regiment. Bolton eventually became fed up of insults being targeted at him and called Brooks to a duel. Read more…

Researching Animal Mummies

18 January 2017 by Lucy Johnson

Some of the animal mummies in the exhibiition

Some of the animal mummies featured in the exhibition.

There are just six weeks left to see our fascinating exhibition Animal Mummies Revealed! Dr Stephanie Atherton-Woolham and Dr Lidija McKnight from the Ancient Egypt Animal Mummy Bio Bank led on the research for the project, working closely with staff here at World Museum and Kelvingrove . In this blog, Stephanie tells us more about what’s involved in researching animal mummies and gives an insight into what they’ve been up to since the exhibition opened…

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Pembroke Place – read all about it!

13 December 2016 by Liz

pp-newspaper-headlines

Today we have a guest blog from Lucy Kilfoyle, a researcher in the History Department at the University of Liverpool. Lucy is leading a team of volunteers investigating historic newspapers as part of the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project.

‘Tragic accidents, grisly murders, heart-rending tales of good people fallen upon hard times: what’s not to like? At first glance, historical newspapers are not exactly the most glamorous of places to find human interest stories from the past. Invariably, old papers and journals are dull and faded and unrelentingly uniform in appearance. The font is often minute and the text packed densely together. Until well into the late 19th century, pictures and graphics were few and far between. Read more…

What happened in the Ceramics Gallery during the Blitz?

7 April 2016 by Emma Martin

Museum staff picking up the pieces in the ceramics gallery after the Blitz

Museum staff picking up the pieces in the ceramics gallery after the Blitz

Lolo is working on the development of an on-line exhibition that explores what happened to World Museum during the Blitz. Here is his second blog, looking at the fate of the ceramics gallery.

The ceramics gallery was one of the galleries that suffered serious damage during the Blitz of May 1941. Rare pieces from the museum’s collection were still on display on the night of 3 May and as the museum crumbled many of the ceramics shattered into pieces. Read more…

Black pitch, carved histories research project

7 March 2016 by Joanna Ostapkowicz

old photo of people digging along a high, steep bank of the lake

An early postcard showing the depths attained in digging pitch, and the manual labour involved. Even at these depths, the lake would refill to its original level within a day or two.

In 2015 I blogged from Trinidad and Tobago, where I was working on the AHRC-funded Pitch Lake project.

We are now entering the final phase of the project, and while work continues on various elements – from the last strontium analyses to the documentation of the replica commission – we’re taking this opportunity to launch the project web pages: Black pitch, carved histories: Prehistoric wood sculpture from Trinidad’s Pitch Lake.

The web pages document the aims, techniques and methodologies of the project, the artefacts studied and the wider context, Read more…

Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place

29 January 2016 by Sam Vaux

Tiled shop front with decorative hoarding

Galkoff’s butcher’s shop today – behind protective hoarding, courtesy of LSTM

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) and National Museums Liverpool (NML) are working together to preserve, record and display the heritage of two important sites on the LSTM campus.

Galkoff’s was a former Jewish butcher’s shop that emerged in the early 20th century. Since the 1970s the building has deteriorated and is unfortunately beyond repair. LSTM acquired the building in 2012, and working in partnership with NML intend to remove the famous tiled frontage from the building, re-present it within the Museum of Liverpool and tell the fascinating history of the business and its place within the local Jewish community.  Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.