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Posts tagged with 'royal school for the blind'

‘Blind School’ digital trail at the Museum of Liverpool

24 November 2016 by Liz

Steve Binns at Mapping Monday (c) Jack Morgan DaDaFest

Steve Binns at Mapping Monday (c) Jack Morgan DaDaFest

Today we have a guest blog from Kerry Massheder-Rigby, History of Place Project Coordinator:

“For Disability History Month 2016 the History of Place project partnered with the Museum of Liverpool to launch a ‘Blind School’ trail on the Merseyside Map in History Detectives.  This trail, about the history of the Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool, has been researched by volunteers as part of the History of Place Project, delivered by Accentuate.  History of Place is a nationally significant social history programme which will chart disabled people’s lives from the middle ages until the late 20th century in relation to built heritage. In Liverpool the project is investigating the Royal School for the Blind, established in 1791.  Read more…

Royal School for the Blind, today

17 December 2014 by Lucy Johnson

A photograph of a young girl who attends the Royal School for the BlindAn admissions register from 1791 which lists the first pupils to attend Liverpool’s Royal School for the Blind is currently on display at the Museum of Liverpool. It is part of Unsung, a display which celebrates the life of Edward Rushton, a human rights activist who started the campaign to set up the school. Teacher Nick Young gives us an insight into the ongoing work of the school today:

Nick Young: “More than two centuries of educating the visually impaired have placed the Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool as one of the leading schools of its kind. The school was founded in 1791 by Edward Rushton and was the first such school in Britain, second only to Paris in the world. Read more…

“An inspiration to the people of Liverpool and beyond”

19 November 2014 by Lucy Johnson

Framed painting of Edward RushtonNick Young, teacher from the Royal School for the Blind, tells us about how Edward Rushton, whose story is currently being told in Unsung displays and events across the city as part of DadaFest International 2014, continues to be an inspiration to the school:

“Every family has its treasures and keepsakes that remind them of where they have come from and possibly point a way to the future. The legacy of Edward Rushton is no exception. Our school is rightly proud to have Rushton amongst its founders. His philanthropy, philosophy and integrity in the face of opposition, particularly in relation to the slave trade, remain an inspiration to the people of Liverpool and beyond. Read more…

Edward Rushton’s legacy

13 November 2014 by Lucy Johnson

An illustration of the school at its first site on Commutation RowThe work of human rights activist Edward Rushton (1756 – 1814) is celebrated in new displays at the International Slavery Museum, the Museum of Liverpool and the Victoria Gallery and Museum.

One of Rushton’s most significant achievements was setting up Liverpool’s Royal School for Blind. Nick Young, a current teacher at the school, will be blogging for us over the next few months. Here Nick tells us more about the history of the school: Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.