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Posts tagged with 'sankofa exhibitions'

Black Blossoms exhibition in Liverpool

19 September 2017 by Mitty

traditional African design of a Sankofa bird

One of a series of carved laser cut panels based on the Ashanti Adinkra symbols by Artist Merissa Hylton

About a month ago I had the pleasure of meeting Bee Tajudeen and Cynthia Silveria when they were up visiting Liverpool and popped into the International Slavery Museum. Bee is the founder of Black Blossoms, she and tell us about the organisation and their incredible exhibition which is on until 30 September in the Royal Standard in Liverpool. Artist Merrissa Hylton also talks about her work which is featured as part of the display.

Black Blossoms, an organisation which aims to amplify the voices of Black women in the creative industries, have begun their art exhibition tour across the UK. Their first location is The Royal Standard Gallery in Liverpool. The exhibition explores socio-political issues, feminism and self love from the perspective of self identifying Black women artists, living in Britain in 2017.  Read more…

Continuing the Journey

23 July 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Photograph of Clint Agard, who contributed to the project

Clint Agard – project contributor

Continuing the Journey at the International Slavery Museum gives an insight into experiences of racism in Merseyside. Leila Romaya from Stray Cat Media tell us more about the project and how it developed…

” ‘Racism is a cancer on this earth’ said one contributor to the project, poet and urban griot Levi Tafari. Continuing the Journey provides a powerful platform that acknowledges the racism that people of African and Caribbean heritage have experienced and continue to experience.

The project’s aim was to give contributors a voice to share their often painful and traumatic experiences of racism through film, photography and audio recordings, as well as offering a wider platform for learning, discussion and debate so that we can work together towards a more cohesive, respectful and accepting future in which illogical racial and cultural stereotypes have no place in our lives.  Read more…

Spotted! That’s me in the photo – 30 years on

20 April 2015 by Kay

two women in front of a huge photo

Vivian with her daughter in front of the photograph of her (right)

Vivian Walcott was recently very surprised to see herself as a 10 year old in the L8 Unseen exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool – especially as she doesn’t remember the event or the photograph being taken!

The picture, of a street party for the L8 Mandela Freedom Festival in 1988, shows Vivian with her friend, Tito Cooper.

She lived in Magdela Street at the time – where her mum, a well-known member of the community still lives, and fondly remembers the tight knit L8 community growing up. Read more…

Elroy Josephs, a tribute

9 October 2012 by Andrew

Performer Elroy Josephs

Tributes to be paid to the life and work of Liverpool based performer Elroy Josephs (1939-1997).

As part of our Black History Month 2012 programme, the International Slavery Museum presents a tribute to actor and dancer, Elroy Josephs in an evening of movement and memories that celebrates the work and artistic achievements of the Liverpool-based artist.

Elroy, who arrived in the UK from Jamaica in 1956 developed a ground breaking fusion of African-Caribbean and European dance styles that changed the way dancers and choreographers thought about movement. Central to this was his understanding of plantation slavery in the Caribbean and its colonial legacy. How he felt this history lived within him and informed his work and gave it the power and emotion he felt was essential for dance to have. Despite Elroy’s influence on British dance heritage, (he was the first Black dance tutor at a British University), his story is largely absent from the history of British Dance. Read more…

Unity Youth Theatre Toxteth project and performance

7 October 2011 by Sam

people talking by park railings and a 'Selborne Street' sign

Courtesy of Clapperboard

Here’s a report from Eilish Clarke from the Unity Youth Theatre, on a project she has been involved in connected to the current Toxteth 1981 exhibition, which is building towards a new perfomance on 28 October, as part of the Black History Month events.


“For the past few months the International Slavery Museum has been working with the Unity Youth Theatre and Clapperboard film project, to help give us a better understanding of the 1981 Toxteth Uprising. As a member of the Unity Youth Theatre, I think it is fair to say we all had very little knowledge of the topic when we first started. However, as the project has progressed we have all become very interested in learning about how the Uprising came about and how it affected the people of Toxteth and Liverpool.

During this project we have been given the opportunity to meet a wide range of fascinating people who have told us their real life stories from the events that took place in July 1981. The first person we met with was Leroy Cooper who used music, dance and photography to show us his interpretation from the Toxteth Uprising. It was brilliant to hear what Leroy Cooper had to say as he was present when the Uprisings started. The next person we met with was John, who was a fire fighter from Toxteth in 1981. He told us what it felt like to be there at the time, especially as he could understand why people were so angry, yet it was important that he was doing his job correctly. This was a really interesting account to listen to. Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.