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Posts tagged with 'sculpture'

Competition time

14 March 2013 by Lisa

Picture of open book

Beth Tweddle has signed a copy of the Museum of Liverpool book that we’re giving away

Following Olympic gymnast Beth Tweddle’s visit to the Museum of Liverpool yesterday, we have a little competition for you to enter.

During her visit, Beth signed a copy of the fabulous Museum of Liverpool book, Liverpool- the Story of a City. The book is illustrated with the collections in the Museum and celebrates Liverpool’s rich history and the people who have made the city what it is today. Beth is undoubtedly one of those individuals, as shown in her dedication and relentless determination. Read more…

Book sale bargains

3 January 2013 by Karen

A brightly coloured teaset

A divine Clarice Cliff ‘tea for two’ set from Age of Jazz.

As January is synonymous with sales and spring cleaning we thought we’d kill two birds with one stone and have a bit of a clear out in our book warehouse. So if you fancy bagging yourself a bargain then check out the offers on our online shop.

It’s an eclectic selection and there are some great books, my personal favourites being ‘When Time Began to Rant and Rage…’ which is a fab book of Irish figurative work and totally worth a fiver, Age of Jazz: British Arts Deco Ceramics as I’m a sucker for a deco teaset, and British Watercolours and Drawings from the Lady Lever’s collection.

If you’ve still not got a John Moores catalogue then now is the time to buy one as they’re reduced to £7.50. And if you buy it from the Walker shop you get the John Moores China version for free. Read more…

Paris’ Fashion Week

17 October 2011 by Alison Cornmell

Liverpool is well known for its glamorous girls and fashionable fellas so it’s no surprise that the city hosts an annual fashion week.

From Tuesday 18 – Saturday 22 October 2011 there will be 40 catwalk shows over five nights at venues across the city centre, with live entertainment from fresh talent every night.

In the weeks leading up to Liverpool Fashion Week many local designers  were busy preparing for the biggest fashion event in the North West including new designer Paris G. Read more…

Art of Love

14 June 2011 by Alison Cornmell

This week photographic artist Marta Soul captured a couple embracing in the sculpture gallery at the Walker Art Gallery.

The Spanish photographer used two models to stage the photograph for a body of work she is creating for an exhibition in LA at the Kopeikin Gallery.

Soul has staged a series of romantic interludes starring the same woman stealing a kiss with different men in various lush settings – the Walker Art Gallery on this occasion. This series of work is called Idilios which means love affair or romance in Spanish. Read more…

A visitor from Easter Island

16 May 2011 by Lisa

We’ve just got some news that a mysterious visitor will soon be arriving at World Museum! Here’s our Curator of Oceanic Collections, Lynne Heidi Stumpe, to tell us about him…


Dark grey stone statue of a head and torso.

Image courtesy and copyright Trustees of the British Museum

An interesting new visitor is arriving at World Museum this evening. Moai Hava is just over five feet high, weighs about two and a half tons and is a little bit rough around the edges. He comes originally from Rapa Nui (Easter Island) but has been staying at the British Museum in London for the last 142 years, along with a larger friend called Hoa Hakananai’a.

All Rapa Nui statues have individual names: ‘moai’ means ‘statue’ or ‘image’ in the Rapanui language and ‘hava’ best translates as ‘to be lost’. Moai Hava is quite a mysterious character. Most moai were carved from volcanic tuff, a relatively soft rock, have a distinctive style and were made to commemorate ancestral chiefs. Moai Hava, however, is one of the few moai made from basalt, a much harder rock and is in a slightly different style. We don’t know exactly why he was made. Read more…

British art gets a make-over at the Walker

21 March 2011 by Lisa

It’s a very exciting week this week as the newly refurbished room at the Walker Art Gallery, ‘British art 1880-1950′, is opening again on Friday. It will showcase pieces from our collections including works by LS Lowry and Lucian Freud, plus many works which have never been on display before!

I had a chat with our curator of British art, Laura MacCulloch, who told me more about what you can expect to see there:

Tell me about the different types of works which are being brought together in this room?
 
This work brings together paintings, sculptures and works on paper with furniture and ceramics all made between 1880 and 1950.  It’s a really exciting period to explore as artists begin to break away from the traditional, Victorian ideas about art and experiment with styles, colours and techniques. It’s great to be able to show fine and decoratvie arts together because it shows how artists working in all media experimented.
 
How does this room differ from the more ‘standard’ rooms of paintings in the Walker?
 
We are aiming to give our visitors more of the context surrounding the art. Between 1880 and 1950 there were huge political and social upheavals brought on by two world wars and increasing industrialisation. We have created an interactive timeline which includes lots of information and images relating to key historical and art historical events. There is more information on the timeline than we could ever fit on a label. Read more…

The Indefatigables

12 October 2010 by Stephen

statue of a boy in naval uniform

An Indefatigable cadet – image courtesy of the Liverpool Daily Post & Echo

I was a very picky eater until I was 17 but all mysteriously changed when we moved house and my appetite gradually improved.

Now there are just three things I won’t eat – tripe, brawn or butterbeans.

These boys’ appetites were helped by working hard in the sea air – great remedies for feeling out of sorts. Even this grub – disgusting as it may now seem – was probably wolfed down with relish.

Both were former warships – one powered by sail and the other by steam – before becoming the training ship Indefatigable, a familiar sight on the Mersey for more than 75 years. Read more…

Aphrodite’s berth

13 September 2010 by Stephen

modern sculpture of the goddess aphrodite

This statue reminds me of a graceful and inscrutable ship’s figurehead – perhaps that was the intention of the artist.

Figureheads adorned ships from the days of Ancient Greece up until late Victorian times. I like the haunting qualities of many figureheads, with their staring eyes fixed on distant horizons.

I also remember the liner on which the statue once stood. Visitors could tour the ship in dock for two shillings and sixpence (12.5p) if I remember rightly.

One of the great sea myths is the legend of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love, rising from the foaming waves. Read more…

The skill behind ‘The Dancer’

28 April 2010 by Lisa

Artist working on a sculpture with a blow torch

Emma Rodgers has now put the finishing touches to ‘The Dancer’ and her display of the sculpture opens today in the Walker Art Gallery.

The sculpture was previously at the Castle Fine Arts Foundry in North Wales but has now taken centre stage in the ‘Emma Rodgers: From Sketch to Sculpture’ display.

The photograph above shows Rodgers patinating the bronze sculpture to create the desired finish. This is achieved by placing powdered chemicals on to the surface before heating them. This results in a chemical reaction which colours the surface of the sculpture. Different chemicals create different colours and it takes a lot of experience to know which chemicals to use to achieve the required colour. Read more…

The sound of Fury roars on

9 April 2010 by Sam

photo of sculpture with its hand held out over the sun, as if it's playing yo yo with it

Billy Fury yoyo by Paul Gallagher

 True legends never fade away but achieve an iconic status and a special place in our hearts. This certainly seems to be true of one of Liverpool’s first rock stars – Billy Fury, who would have been 70 next week.

Billy is commemorated with a striking sculpture in the Albert Dock – a fitting location as he worked as a deck hand on the Mersey tug boat The Formby before he found fame.

The sculpture is popular with fans, tourists and photographers – as you can see in our Billy Fury sculpture group on Flickr. The number of photos in the group is growing all the time, a testament to Billy’s lasting appeal. There’s also an incredible variety with people continually finding new and imaginative ways of depicting the sculpture – such as Paul Gallagher’s photo of Billy playing yo yo with the sun above. Read more…

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