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Posts tagged with 'second world war'

Remembering victims of the May Blitz, 1941

4 May 2016 by Claire

tinted portrait on a mirror

Mirror featuring image of Peter Johnson, aged 15

Here at Museum of Liverpool, we receive many generous, interesting, and often poignant donations of objects to our collections. Recently, we were contacted by a lady called Janet, who wished to kindly donate items that had originally belonged to her late grandmother, Margaret Johnson. The items relate to Margaret’s children who were tragically killed in the May Blitz, the most concentrated series of air attacks on any British city area outside London during the Second World War. Read more…

Don Pedro: the elephant that died twice

22 April 2016 by Emma Martin

Don Pedro (the elephant) standing proud at the centre of the Upper Horseshoe Gallery before 3 May 1941

Don Pedro (the elephant) standing proud at the centre of the Upper Horseshoe Gallery before 3 May 1941

University of Manchester student Lolo is working on our new online exhibition that will be launched 3 May. Here’s his latest blog on some of the objects and specimens that feature in it.

“Many of you may already know that the King of Prussia Jug was one of the Blitz survivors. But not all the stories relating to the museum’s objects and specimens had a happy ending. There were also hundreds if not thousands of casualties. I was very upset when we heard about the sad story of Don Pedro, a male Indian elephant once in the zoology collection. They say cats have nine lives, but poor Don Pedro had just two. Read more…

Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community

18 April 2016 by Sam

picture of a girl behind rows of barbed wire

Depiction of a girl on the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial © Lee Karen Stow

As part of her ongoing research for the Poppies: Women and War project, photographer Lee Karen Stow has travelled to America. In her latest blog post from her travels, she tells of an encounter with a woman whose life was turned upside down as a result of the Second World War:

“Unexpectedly, whilst visiting Bainbridge Island in America’s Pacific North West, I met Kazuko ‘Kay’ Nakao. Now 97 years old, Kay was one of 227 Japanese-Americans forcibly removed by armed US Army soldiers from their homes on the island one morning in March 1942, to be interned in concentration camps Read more…

House of Memories Armed Forces Days

13 April 2016 by Mitty

A suitcase containing objects associated with the Army such as a kit bag, documents and Army Dress cap

Army themed memory suitcase

For the last few months I’ve been working on a very exciting new project in connection with the Museum of Liverpool’s award winning House of Memories. The programme has helped thousands of healthcare professionals and family members increase their understanding of how to support people with dementia to live well with dementia.

My role is to work with the Armed Forces community to develop a new strand of House of Memories, funded by the Armed Forces Covenant. This has involved a great deal of consultation with people to ensure we are making the experience as relevant as possible.  Read more…

What happened in the Ceramics Gallery during the Blitz?

7 April 2016 by Emma Martin

Museum staff picking up the pieces in the ceramics gallery after the Blitz

Museum staff picking up the pieces in the ceramics gallery after the Blitz

Lolo is working on the development of an on-line exhibition that explores what happened to World Museum during the Blitz. Here is his second blog, looking at the fate of the ceramics gallery.

The ceramics gallery was one of the galleries that suffered serious damage during the Blitz of May 1941. Rare pieces from the museum’s collection were still on display on the night of 3 May and as the museum crumbled many of the ceramics shattered into pieces. Read more…

The night World Museum nearly died

26 February 2016 by Emma Martin

The upper horseshoe gallery was home to the natural history collections in 1941. In pride of place was Don Pedro, the Indian elephant

The upper horseshoe gallery was home to the natural history collections in 1941. In pride of place was Don Pedro, the Indian elephant.

Over the next few weeks Lolo, a student working at World Museum, will blog about the events of the 3rd May 1941 – the night World Museum nearly died. Here at the museum we are preparing to launch an on-line exhibition on the 3rd May. We will recount what happened that night 75 years ago and Lolo will also be writing blogs that reveal in more depth what happened to some of the museum’s objects. Read more…

Black Germans and the Holocaust: The Aftermath

20 January 2016 by Adam

This photograph shows two Afro-German women who survived Nazi persecution in a bar which Black survivors set up in Berlin after the war. They both featured in last year's lecture on Black Germans and the Holocaust.

This photograph shows two Afro-German women who survived Nazi persecution in a bar which Black survivors set up in Berlin after the war. They both featured in last year’s lecture on Black Germans and the Holocaust.

The International Slavery Museum will be marking Holocaust Memorial Day in January 2016 with a special free guest lecture by Professor Eve Rosenhaft from the University of Liverpool, who will be talking about the experiences of the Black German community in the aftermath of World War Two.

Like me, you may have been moved and intrigued by the resilience of individuals highlighted in Professor Rosenhaft’s previous lecture on Black Germans during the Holocaust, so this will be an opportunity both for people new to this history as well as those of us keen to explore further.

Eve tells us more:

“Hitler’s racist policies and the upheavals of the Second World War interrupted the growth of Germany’s first Black community, damaging individuals and families. This lecture explores what happened after the end of the war, as Holocaust survivors tried to rebuild their lives, and a new generation of Afro-Germans tested the democratic values of the new West Germany.

“When Hitler came to power, there was a growing Black community in Germany, made up of people from Germany’s former colonies and their children and grandchildren as well as Africans and African Americans. They had formed social networks and political organisations, and were in contact with people of African descent in the United States and France.

“The racist and genocidal policies pursued by the Nazi regime left Black men and women damaged by internment, forced labour and sterilisation and families broken and dispersed. This lecture explores developments after the end of World War Two, when Black Holocaust survivors sought to rebuild their lives and networks in a divided Europe. Against this background a new generation of Black Germans, the children of American occupation soldiers, began to grow up, challenging the young West German democracy to prove that Nazi racism was a thing of the past”.

Black Germans and the Holocaust: The Aftermath is on Saturday 23 January 2015 in the Anthony Walker Education Centre at the International Slavery Museum. This is a free talk and all are welcome.

Additional events will be taking place during Holocaust Memorial Day on Wednesday January 27th. English Cabaret with Kilmuir Papers will commemorate the 70th anniversary of the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, with a moving cycle of songs and readings. The first performance will take place at 1pm at the International Slavery Museum and the second performance will take place at the Museum of Liverpool at 2.30pm. These performances are free and all are welcome.

A year in blogs – our top 5 stories from 2015!

31 December 2015 by Lisa

Mother and sons with Jubilee decorations

Silver Jubilee street party, June 1977, Old Swan, Liverpool

As 2015 draws to a close, we’re looking back on some of the most popular stories from the blog this year. We began the year by revealing how the Walker Art Gallery’s Henry VIII portrait was used as inspiration for the costumes in BBC drama series, ‘Wolf Hall’ – and we ended the year with our celebrations at World Museum for the amazing blast off of Tim Peake!

But which are the stories that have captured your imagination this year? Here are are the top five stories from our blog that you’ve been enjoying the most in 2015… *drum roll please* Read more…

Remembering the women on Poppy Day

5 November 2015 by Sam

woman in uniform

Iris M Newbould, Women’s Land Army © Lee Karen Stow

Photographer Lee Karen Stow shares the story of another one of the women she met during the research for her exhibition Poppies: Women and War, which is currently on display at the Museum of Liverpool.

Don’t forget that Lee will be back at the Museum to hold a free photography workshop and tour of the exhibition on Saturday 14 November. Full details of this and other events are on our Remembrance events page.

“In Whitehall, London, a few strides north of the Cenotaph and the tomb to the unknown soldier is the Monument to the Women of World War II. This tall, bronze pillar, sculpted by artist John W Mills, is a giant coat rack. Seventeen types of uniform, representing the roles thousands of women undertook during the war, hang on coat hooks, symbolising their job done. Unveiled by the Queen in 2005, this monument of recognition was a long time coming.

One of the uniforms represents members of the 80,000-strong Women’s Land Army (WLA). Women like Iris Newbould, now aged 90. Iris is one of the few ‘Land Girls’ still around to share memories Read more…

The City of Benares legacy 75 years on

20 October 2015 by Jen

John Baker holding a page from a newspaper

City of Benares survivor John Baker holding a copy of his local paper in which he was interviewed. Picture taken on his recent visit to the maritime Museum.

One of the great things about working on projects around events within living memory is that often they prompt people to come forward and talk about their own experiences or family story. At a 75 year remove, with most of the children not from the local area, I wasn’t sure how much impact our City of Benares feature would have in this respect but I was pleasantly surprised. Some people got in touch to say they’d known or knew people who had been on board, a representative of the Sunderland Volunteer Life Brigade (SVLB) made contact to say they were marking the 75th anniversary with a service and small display, and one of the child survivors even turned up at the Maritime Museum for a chat.  Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.