Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'slavery'

I was Born to Be Free – poem by Kenneth Samuels

17 August 2016 by Sarah

slavery-remembrance-day-logoThe Museum is looking ahead to Slavery Remembrance Day on 23 August. A crucial event in the fight to end the European transatlantic slave trade happened on this date in 1791, when there was an uprising of enslaved Africans on the island of Saint Domingue (modern Haiti). 

Thinking about this today, we are publishing a moving poem about slavery from Kenneth Samuels, a visitor to the Museum, who was actually born on 23 August – but 175 years after Haiti. Here is the poem with an introduction by Kenneth:

Read more…

‘Trade’ – exhibition provides inspiration for new theatre venture

28 July 2016 by Alison

Jogini - wedding ceremony

Jogini – wedding ceremony

In June last year ‘Broken Lives – Slavery in Modern India’ opened at the International Slavery Museum, a powerful and moving exhibition revealing stories of hardship, survival and hope for broken lives mended.

The exhibition (open until 11 December), delivered in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, focuses on the victims of modern slavery in India, most of who are ‘Dalits’. Many Dalits still experience marginalisation and prejudice, live in extreme poverty and are vulnerable to human trafficking and bonded labour.

Feedback from visitors to the exhibition has been incredible, for one particular individual though their visit has left a lasting impression… Read more…

A British Subject Enslaved in America

8 July 2016 by Sarah

Newspaper clip about William Houston from the Lebanon Courier, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 16 April 1852.

Newspaper clip about William Houston from the Lebanon Courier, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 16 April 1852.

This week’s guest blogger, David Fiske, spent years investigating the life of Solomon Northup, the free Black man whose kidnapping and enslavement was the basis for the film ‘12 Years a Slave’. Sadly, the tragedy that befell Northup was not unique. David shares the history of William Houston, a free Black man living here in Liverpool (UK) in around 1840, who was enslaved in America: Read more…

Fair Trade and Supply Chains: History, Policy and Action

19 February 2016 by Sarah

Joe Kelly, a PhD researcher with the University of Liverpool and International Slavery Museum, who has put together an online exhibition about Abercrombie Square

Joe Kelly, PhD researcher with the University of Liverpool and International Slavery Museum

You may have seen discussions in the news about fair trade and supply chains recently? And Fairtrade Fortnight 2016 is fast approaching…

On 1 March, we are bringing together experts to discuss the Modern Slavery Act, and its ability to deal with British companies profiting from modern slavery in their supply chains.

This will be followed by a guided tour of our ‘Broken Lives: Slavery in Modern India’ exhibition.

Ahead of this, we’re speaking to Joe Kelly, an ESRC funded PhD researcher with the University of Liverpool and International Slavery Museum. His work focuses on the relationship between British businesses in the post-emancipation period. Here’s Joe’s guest-blog…. Read more…

Freeing those trapped by the ‘bonds of debt’

26 January 2016 by Alison

Urmila (Indian lady) holds up her identity card

© Image courtesy of International Justice Mission: Urmila becomes a first time voter at the age of 75.

According to Hannah Flint, Regional Development Executive, North of England – INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE MISSION® UK: “There are two reasons why I have loved working for International Justice Mission (IJM); the people I work with, and the people I work for. My colleagues in IJM India work alongside local authorities to rescue thousands of victims of slavery and trafficking each year. Read more…

Claim no easy victories: Cape Verde and Cabral

12 November 2015 by Richard

Poetry performance at Cidade Velha

Poetry performance at Cidade Velha

Hello,

I have just returned from Cape Verde where I attended a committee meeting and colloquium in my role as the UK representative of the UNESCO Slave Route project. Read more…

Thrown out of his village: now bringing hope to thousands

15 October 2015 by Alison

Kavi

Kumar Swamy is South India Director for the Dalit Freedom Network and is responsible for oversight of a range of on the ground education, healthcare and economic programmes run for the benefit of Dalit communities in India. These trafficking prevention projects are helping to bring about real change – not only freeing Dalits from modern forms of slavery, but freeing them from the factors that make them so vulnerable to exploitation and abuse in the first place. Here Kumar tells us of the challenges he faced growing up as a young Dalit boy in India, and of the work going on to bring about meaningful and long-lasting change in the country he loves. Read more…

The Lady Lever’s star objects: slavery medallion

7 October 2015 by Lisa

medallion-blogWhile the Lady Lever Art Gallery’s South End galleries are closed for redevelopment, we have chosen a selection of ‘star objects’ from these galleries that you can now see online. Here is our Senior Curator of Art Galleries, Alyson Pollard, to tell us about one of her favourites:  Read more…

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

Walking in the footsteps of Glasgow’s past

5 August 2014 by Richard

Crowds outside the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art

Hello,

Last week I spoke at the ‘Untold Stories, Buried Histories’ panel event in Glasgow, part of  The Empire Café, a week long exploration of Scotland’s relationship with slavery and Atlantic slave trade.  It was planned so that it ran for the duration of the Commonwealth Games.  This is particularly interesting as the legacy and relevancy of the Commonwealth is widely discussed and debated.   It did not take me long to see the legacy of Glasgow’s role in the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as I walked to the venue past the Gallery of Modern Art (once the townhouse of William Cunninghame, a prominent Glaswegian tobacco merchant) and Buchanan and Ingram Streets, both named after merchants who also became rich on the suffering of those working on their plantations. Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

Subscribe

RSS RSS Feed

Disclaimer

We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.