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Posts tagged with 'slavery'

Ndaba Mandela to come to Liverpool for Slavery Remembrance Day

1 July 2015 by Lucy

Image of Ndaba Mandela

Ndaba Mandela will be joining us for Slavery Remembrance Day this year

We are really pleased to announce that Ndaba Mandela, grandson of the beloved and iconic Nelson Mandela, has accepted an invitation to deliver the Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture this year on Friday 21 August.

The lecture is part of our plans for the city’s sixteenth annual Slavery Remembrance Day, which has been taking place since 1999. There’s three days of activities, with the main day of events taking place on Slavery Remembrance Day itself, Sunday 23  August.  Read more…

Brutal Exposure reviewed by Vava Tampa

13 April 2015 by Lucy Johnson

Image of Congolese man with injured wrist at entrance to exhibitionThere are less than two months left to visit our powerful exhibition Brutal Exposure: the Congo at the International Slavery Museum. Vava Tampa, founder of Save the Congo and chair of the Morel Prize, has given his thoughts on the display:

Brutal Exposure: the Congo at Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum is notable for many things. One of the masterpieces at the heart of this brilliantly staged installation is a still, sanitised portrait of a Congolese man Lomboto.

Simple and sublime, Lomboto’s portrait, which is also the exhibition’s lead image – and one of the few images that became iconic for colonial brutality – fills the high white wall of the exhibition’s entrance space, Read more…

Walking in the footsteps of Glasgow’s past

5 August 2014 by Richard

Crowds outside the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art

Hello,

Last week I spoke at the ‘Untold Stories, Buried Histories’ panel event in Glasgow, part of  The Empire Café, a week long exploration of Scotland’s relationship with slavery and Atlantic slave trade.  It was planned so that it ran for the duration of the Commonwealth Games.  This is particularly interesting as the legacy and relevancy of the Commonwealth is widely discussed and debated.   It did not take me long to see the legacy of Glasgow’s role in the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as I walked to the venue past the Gallery of Modern Art (once the townhouse of William Cunninghame, a prominent Glaswegian tobacco merchant) and Buchanan and Ingram Streets, both named after merchants who also became rich on the suffering of those working on their plantations. Read more…

Maya Angelou: a soulful life

30 May 2014 by Richard

Maya Angelou at TSGHello,

Sadly, the great poet, author and activist Maya Angelou – born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1928 has passed.  She opened the Transatlantic Slavery gallery (predecessor to the International Slavery Museum) in 1994. Tony Tibbles, who later became the Director of the Merseyside Maritime Museum, worked closely on the development of the groundbreaking gallery and wrote an interesting article on how it came to be.   He notes how they persuaded Maya Angelou to attend the opening and indeed we still have a plaque in our collection which marks this unique event.  Read more…

12 Years a Slave competition

13 May 2014 by Andrew

12YAS-image-web

12 Years a Slave first prize bundle

To celebrate the Blu-ray and DVD release of 12 Years a Slave out May 12, we have three copies of the DVD, book and soundtrack to give away, as well as seven copies of the book and soundtrack. Read more…

My Family, My Pride: Maroon Ancestry

7 May 2014 by Andrew

An image of guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

Guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

I don’t remember the first time I heard about my Maroon ancestry, Mother would talk about Jamaica often, stories about farming, school or just sitting on the veranda watching the sun set but the Maroon heritage heartened every story. Bump Grave, the blowing of the abeng, warriors disguised as trees; stories of real people, their customs and traditions passed down to me through my Mother. I do remember feeling the immense pride in belonging to a group of such resilient, resourceful and spirited people. Read more…

How Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery

1 May 2014 by Dickie

head and shoulders image of man smiling

Author and historian David Fiske

The film 12 Years a Slave, which tells the story of Solomon Northup, has gripped audiences around the globe. To coincide with the release of the movie on Blu-ray and DVD, author and historian David Fiske blogs about the man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery.
Read more…

New Tate piece explores artist’s connection to the enslaved

27 February 2014 by Felicity

Image of Visceral Canker by Donald Rodney

Donald Rodney Visceral Canker 1990 © The estate of Donald Rodney

A new exhibition titled  Keywords: Art, Culture and Society in 1980s Britain opens at Tate Liverpool tomorrow. One of the key pieces in the exhibition tells the story of Britain’s involvement with the slave trade in a striking, visual form. Read more…

Remembering Dorothy Kuya

2 January 2014 by David Fleming

Today I’d like to pay tribute to leading anti-racism campaigner Dorothy Kuya who died following a short illness on 23 December, 2013. Dorothy’s impact and influence stretched far beyond the L8 streets were she was raised.

Read more…

New Legacies sessions for schools

13 November 2013 by Mitty

Image of a teachers' guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

Teachers’ guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

We’re officially launching a new session for schools. It focuses on the legacies of transatlantic slavery and is designed for key stage 3 and 4 students. It has been a while in the making and has been a real challenge to do but I’m really pleased with the outcome and how the session has shaped up.

Read more…

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