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Posts tagged with 'slavery'

New Tate piece explores artist’s connection to the enslaved

27 February 2014 by Felicity

Image of Visceral Canker by Donald Rodney

Donald Rodney Visceral Canker 1990 © The estate of Donald Rodney

A new exhibition titled  Keywords: Art, Culture and Society in 1980s Britain opens at Tate Liverpool tomorrow. One of the key pieces in the exhibition tells the story of Britain’s involvement with the slave trade in a striking, visual form. Read more…

Remembering Dorothy Kuya

2 January 2014 by David Fleming

Today I’d like to pay tribute to leading anti-racism campaigner Dorothy Kuya who died following a short illness on 23 December, 2013. Dorothy’s impact and influence stretched far beyond the L8 streets were she was raised.

Read more…

New Legacies sessions for schools

13 November 2013 by Mitty

Image of a teachers' guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

Teachers’ guide to the legacy gallery and object handling session.

We’re officially launching a new session for schools. It focuses on the legacies of transatlantic slavery and is designed for key stage 3 and 4 students. It has been a while in the making and has been a real challenge to do but I’m really pleased with the outcome and how the session has shaped up.

Read more…

All the World is Now Richer

16 September 2013 by Zachary

steel sculpture of six standing figures

All the World is Now Richer

This month Sokari Douglas Camp is exhibiting her series of six powerful welded steel sculpture at St Georges Hall just a stone’s throw from World Museum Liverpool. The exhibition, titled  All the World is Now Richer, has been installed in the Dickens & Gladstone Gallery and is a fitting commemoration for the abolition of slavery. Sokari’s steel figures stand strong and erect. They are modelled on people she remembers but they were inspired by a well known quotation from William Prescott, a former slave in the United States:

“They will remember that we were sold but they won’t remember that we were strong. They will remember that we were bought but not that we were brave”.

Read more…

Slavery Remembrance Day – the journey continues

5 September 2013 by Richard

Flower arrangement saying 'We remember'

Another Slavery Remembrance Day has now passed but this does not mean that we consign its message, what it means to the people of Liverpool and beyond, to one side for another year. The core message, that of “We remember” from the descendants of enslaved Africans, members of the Diaspora and the wider public only has meaning when we work to make sure that the sacrifices, and achievements, of the ancestors are recognized to make the world a better place. Idealistic, maybe, but without a “dream” the legacies of four hundred years of enslavement, and resistance, would be forgotten. The world is not yet a place with full equality and freedom for all, free from discrimination or racism, but it’s a place where many people refuse to let the past sleep, to go unrecognized.  Read more…

Louise Ellman MP: “Slavery Remembrance Day fuses past and present”

19 August 2013 by Dickie

 

floral tributes on the dockside. Bright yellow and red wreaths with the words WE REMEMBER

Floral tributes at Slavery Remembrance Day

Guest blog by Louise Ellman, MP for Liverpool Riverside, who looks ahead to Slavery Remembrance Day which she believes fuses the past and the present. Mrs Ellman has attended every single Slavery Remembrance Day since 1999.

“Commemorating Slavery Remembrance Day in Liverpool is very special.  It is a grim reminder of the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade and an important part of the vital task of educating present and future generations about the enormity of this assault on human dignity and freedom. The consequences of the devastation it wrought on long-established African communities are still felt today.  Read more…

Which Black Briton should appear on a British bank note?

22 July 2013 by Dickie

olaudah_equiano_engraving

In 2016 Winston Churchill is set to replace Elizabeth Fry as the face on our fivers. It’s also been reported that Jane Austen is “waiting in the wings” to make her bow on a note sometime in the future. Which Black Briton do you think should appear on our bank notes? Dr Richard Benjamin, Head of the International Slavery Museum has made his choice. Read more…

Talking the talk, walking the walk

14 June 2013 by Richard

cutting the ribbon at the start of the Walk for Freedom

2013 Walk for Freedom

Hello,

It has been a varied month since my last blog.  It was a pleasure welcoming Garvin Nicholas, the High Commissioner for Trinidad and Tobago at the end of May for a tour of the International Slavery Museum (ISM).  My colleague James Hernandez came along to meet the delegation, a nice dimension was that he has Trinidadian roots.  As part of the tour we went into the Anthony Walker Education Centre which among other things has a display of Caribbean flags, except, quelle surprise, Trinidad and Tobago.  The High Commissioner kindly offered to send the Museum a flag for our collection.  He was very impressed with the Museum, especially the inclusion on our Black Achievers Wall of a number of Trinidadians & Tobagonians such as Lord Learie Constantine, Dr Roi Kwabena and CLR James. Read more…

Breaking the heart of darkness

14 February 2013 by Richard

Hello all,

Conrad’s classic Heart of Darkness is a powerful indictment of imperialism at its height which swept across Africa and in particular the repressive and brutal reign of the Belgians in the Congo, which had become the fiefdom of King Leopold II. The book centres on Marlow, a sailor who works for a Belgian ivory trading company, and encounters widespread brutality by the company. At the end of the book Conrad’s narrator encounters Kurtz (Brando in Apocalypse Now), who had worked for the company but turned himself into a demigod and who was guilty of carrying out horrifying atrocities. Read more…

E-footprints

31 January 2013 by Richard

group photo in the museum

Beverley Knight, Nicola Green, Richard Benjamin and David Lammy MP

Hello all,

Unfortunately we had to cancel the planned event with the artist Nicola Green at the Walker Art Gallery on Friday 18th due to the bad weather. However, before the venues closed I was able to give Nicola and her friends and family a tour of the International Slavery Museum. Amongst the group was the singer Beverley Knight who had a very thought provoking visit and David Lammy MP – long time supporter of the International Slavery Museum. It’s a lot to take in for some people on their initial visit, and they might experience a number of emotions, so I am sure that many of the group will come back in the future. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.