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Posts tagged with 'social history'

Remembering the World Cup 1966 – the Merseyside connection

18 June 2018 by Kay

 The cover of a visitor guide to Liverpool for football fans at the World Cup 1966

A visitor guide to Liverpool for football fans at the World Cup 1966

1966 was a good year for football on Merseyside….oh, and for England too!  When the World Cup was held in this country in July that year, Liverpool had just won the League and Everton the FA Cup.

In the museum’s collections we have a number of items which relate to World Cup matches played at Goodison Park, including match tickets, a visitor guide to the city for fans, an invite and menu from a special luncheon given by The Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Liverpool on the occasion of the semi-final of the World Cup at the Town Hall, Liverpool City Transport tickets for overseas visitors and spectator notices.

Tickets from the five games held at Goodison Park were recently kindly donated by Jack Mulvey, an Everton fan. He tells us more – Read more…

Liverpool and the Larrinagas: drop-in afternoon 2 June

21 May 2018 by Kay

Photograph album with old family photos inside

Image copyright John Turton for the Hispanic Liverpool Project

Kirsty Hooper, Head of Hispanic Studies at the University of Warwick, tells us more about an exciting upcoming event held in partnership with the Museum of Liverpool:

“Did you or your family work for the Larrinaga company, at sea, in their Liverpool offices or in one of their family homes around Sefton Park?

Does your family have connections with Liverpool’s Hispanic community?

Do you have information, stories or photographs that you would like to share?

We would love to hear from you at our drop-in event at the Museum of Liverpool, Saturday 2 June 1-4pm. Read more…

Remembering the Liverpool carters

14 May 2018 by Sharon

horse statue with garlands of paper flowers draped around it

Monument to the working horse decorated with paper flowers

Every year at the Museum of Liverpool we hold an afternoon of events and activities to celebrate the work of the Liverpool carters and their horses, linked to the traditional carters’ May Day celebrations. Our 2018 event took place under a lovely blue sky. Our talks on ‘Animals in the First World War’ and ‘Liverpool Parades and Shows’ were well attended and everyone enjoyed making colourful paper flowers for our memorial ceremony.

Frank Short has supported the event every year with his display of magnificent model carts. With a family background in carting Frank has always been fascinated by both horses and carts and spends many, many hours on his models. This year he has expanded into modelling clay figures to accompany the carts – with impressive results. Read more…

Pembroke pubs

2 May 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Daniel Edmonds, Research Lead on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project:

“Throughout its history Pembroke Place has been home to a number of different types of leisure activities, from roller-skating rinks to zoos. It probably comes as no surprise that a series of public houses and hotels also thrived in the area. Some of our researchers have been investigating the night-life of Pembroke Place and the history of its establishments.

The Pembroke Hotel was pre-eminent, with mentions of its events appearing in both the local and national press. Throughout the late-Victorian Era, this local fixture hosted numerous gatherings attended by local dignitaries. Read more…

Liverpool carters remembered

26 April 2018 by Laura

Horse sculpture

Waiting: The monument to the Liverpool working horse by Judy Boyt FRSA

This weekend visitors and staff will be coming together to once again make the paper flower garlands for Waiting, the monument to the Liverpool cart horse. Read more…

Memories of Liverpool’s Royal School for the Blind

11 April 2018 by Laura

Fingers on braille

Braille plan of the Liverpool Blind School

With the exhibition The Blind School: Pioneering People and Places drawing to a close this week, History of Place Project Coordinator, Kerry  Massheder-Rigby tells us more about the next stage of the project:

“We are keen to capture additional first-hand memories of what life was like for students who attended the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool, the first of its kind in Britain when founded in 1791. Read more…

Looking back on back houses

6 April 2018 by Liz

Patchin Place, Greenwich Village, New York. ‘Court’ style houses filling a small side street area.

I was fortunate enough to make a research trip to New York recently, with my colleague Poppy Learman. This was supported by the Art Fund’s Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial Research Grant, and the Heritage Lottery Fund through the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project.

We visited numerous heritage sites, archives and museums. One of the highlights for me was meeting staff at Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and discussed their work on New York’s back houses. The irregular street layout at the south tip of Manhattan, developed from the Dutch settlement street pattern, creates areas where courts and alleys developed, with some similarities to Liverpool court housing. A walking tour with Sarah Apmann enabled us to see examples of the Greenwich Village back housing. Read more…

Hard sweat: Liverpool’s garment district

16 March 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Susan Bennett, volunteer researcher working on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project. This Heritage Lottery Fund-supported project is exploring the history of this fascinating Liverpool street in all its facets:

“Cobblers, boot and shoemakers, tailors, all manner of drapers, wool, linen and silk merchants, all leapt out of the pages of Liverpool Street Directories in my research Read more…

‘Frontstage and backstage at the Magic Clock, Easter lunchtime 1969’

12 March 2018 by Kay

pub in a city street

The Magic Clock, Roe Street, 1968. Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office, Liverpool Libraries.

Dr Jo Stanley, creative historian, made a textile artwork of the interior of the Magic Clock pub, Roe Street, Liverpool, especially for our Tales from the city exhibition. Jo, originally from Crosby, was a barmaid at the pub, over Christmas 1968 and Easter 1969, in vacations from teacher training college.

The Magic Clock was popular with gay men. It was situated in Liverpool’s original ‘gay quarter’ around Queen Square. Read more…

Rethinking Disability Symposium

6 March 2018 by Laura

People in exhibition

Visitors in The Blind School exhibition

We’re looking forward to hosting Rethinking Disability on Friday 9 March. A symposium for the museums and galleries sector, the aim is to bring together individuals committed to creating to bringing about real and lasting change.

Esther Fox, Head of Accentuate said:

“We know that Museums and Galleries are wanting to support better access and representation for deaf and disabled people. We also know there have been significant strides towards this over the last 10 years. However we still have a long way to go and we are not at the point where inclusive practice is the norm. This event provides an opportunity for people to share, learn and most importantly challenge thinking, encouraging people to take more risks.”

The symposium is part of History of Place, a national project run by Accentuate, which explores 800 years of disability history through eight different sites around the UK.  Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.