Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'social history'

Memories of Liverpool’s Royal School for the Blind

11 April 2018 by Laura

Fingers on braille

Braille plan of the Liverpool Blind School

With the exhibition The Blind School: Pioneering People and Places drawing to a close this week, History of Place Project Coordinator, Kerry  Massheder-Rigby tells us more about the next stage of the project:

“We are keen to capture additional first-hand memories of what life was like for students who attended the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool, the first of its kind in Britain when founded in 1791. Read more…

Looking back on back houses

6 April 2018 by Liz

Patchin Place, Greenwich Village, New York. ‘Court’ style houses filling a small side street area.

I was fortunate enough to make a research trip to New York recently, with my colleague Poppy Learman. This was supported by the Art Fund’s Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial Research Grant, and the Heritage Lottery Fund through the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project.

We visited numerous heritage sites, archives and museums. One of the highlights for me was meeting staff at Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and discussed their work on New York’s back houses. The irregular street layout at the south tip of Manhattan, developed from the Dutch settlement street pattern, creates areas where courts and alleys developed, with some similarities to Liverpool court housing. A walking tour with Sarah Apmann enabled us to see examples of the Greenwich Village back housing. Read more…

Hard sweat: Liverpool’s garment district

16 March 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Susan Bennett, volunteer researcher working on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project. This Heritage Lottery Fund-supported project is exploring the history of this fascinating Liverpool street in all its facets:

“Cobblers, boot and shoemakers, tailors, all manner of drapers, wool, linen and silk merchants, all leapt out of the pages of Liverpool Street Directories in my research Read more…

‘Frontstage and backstage at the Magic Clock, Easter lunchtime 1969’

12 March 2018 by Kay

pub in a city street

The Magic Clock, Roe Street, 1968. Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office, Liverpool Libraries.

Dr Jo Stanley, creative historian, made a textile artwork of the interior of the Magic Clock pub, Roe Street, Liverpool, especially for our Tales from the city exhibition. Jo, originally from Crosby, was a barmaid at the pub, over Christmas 1968 and Easter 1969, in vacations from teacher training college.

The Magic Clock was popular with gay men. It was situated in Liverpool’s original ‘gay quarter’ around Queen Square. Read more…

Rethinking Disability Symposium

6 March 2018 by Laura

People in exhibition

Visitors in The Blind School exhibition

We’re looking forward to hosting Rethinking Disability on Friday 9 March. A symposium for the museums and galleries sector, the aim is to bring together individuals committed to creating to bringing about real and lasting change.

Esther Fox, Head of Accentuate said:

“We know that Museums and Galleries are wanting to support better access and representation for deaf and disabled people. We also know there have been significant strides towards this over the last 10 years. However we still have a long way to go and we are not at the point where inclusive practice is the norm. This event provides an opportunity for people to share, learn and most importantly challenge thinking, encouraging people to take more risks.”

The symposium is part of History of Place, a national project run by Accentuate, which explores 800 years of disability history through eight different sites around the UK.  Read more…

A proposal with Pride!

2 March 2018 by Kay

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

Navy uniform hat, paper flowers and wedding photo in museum display case

We have recently added some fantastic new items to our community case in the Tales from the city exhibition. This case enables us to reveal LGBT+ stories not represented in the exhibition, which people contact us about and would like to share.

The items were very kindly loaned by Emma and Ann Miller-McCaffrey and tell the story of their relationship.  Read more…

10 Decades On: Liverpool Women 100

2 February 2018 by Kay

Gallery

Taking Liberties on display in The People’s Republic

2018 marks 100 years since the passing of the Representation of the People Act. After a long hard fight, some women over the age of 30 were given the right to vote for the first time. The Act also granted men over the age of 21 the vote. It would be another 10 years until this was equalised for women over the age of 21 in 1928.

The campaign in Liverpool saw both militant and peaceful tactics employed to win the basic right to vote. Women were jailed and force fed in Walton Gaol, bombs were planted around the city and windows smashed.  Read more…

Trans Atlantic Militaries : LGBTQ rights

22 January 2018 by Kay

Caroline Paige in Royal Air Force uniform at the door of number 10

Caroline outside of 10 Downing Street, 2012. Courtesy of Caroline Paige.

Our fifth blog post for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Caroline Paige.

Caroline, who was the first openly transgender officer in the British Armed Forces, will be exploring ‘Trans Atlantic militaries; how the UK showed the way and the USA lost it; and the implications for LGBTQ rights’. Read more…

Liverpool Pride – The inside story

17 January 2018 by Kay

Mayor leading crowds at the Liverpool Pride march

Liverpool Pride 2010 © Jeb Smith

Our fourth blog post instalment for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February 2018, is from Joan Burnett.

Joan, a trustee of Liverpool Pride, will be presenting ‘Liverpool Pride: A Local Protest, An International Message’.

She tells us more –

“My talk shows the development of Liverpool Pride from a protest from grass roots reaction to a local hate crime, to a large scale public event that has become part of a city’s cultural calendar and which has consistently uses Liverpool’s status as an internationally renowned city to raise awareness of LGBT+ human rights.”

Read more…

The trial of Lord Alfred Douglas – have your say! Guilty or not guilty?

15 January 2018 by Kay

smartly dressed man sitting at a table piled with books

Lord Alfred Douglas

Our third blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Peter Scott-Presland and Andrew Lumsden.

Peter and Andrew will be delivering an interactive presentation in which the audience will be invited to participate and to come to its own ‘verdict’.

They tell us more –

“The trial is a reinterpretation of events believed to be well-known. Alfred Douglas is thought of as Oscar Wilde’s Great Love, and they are tragically yoked together forever in Queer Myth. Peter will argue that on the contrary, Douglas was nothing less than a murderer, both physically and creatively. Andrew appears for the defence, seeing Douglas as a forerunner of the Gay Liberation Front”.

The full programme for the day at the Museum of Liverpool can be seen here
Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

Subscribe

RSS RSS Feed

Disclaimer

We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.