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Posts tagged with 'social history'

Jane’s jigsaw – ‘From There to Here’

28 May 2014 by Kay

jigsaw with photos of different people and objects

This jigsaw is one of 8 unique and wonderful artworks on display in the exhibition From There to Here: the hidden history of People with Learning Difficulties in Merseyside, Museum of Liverpool.

The artworks celebrate the lives and experiences of the people who helped to make the exhibition. Each participant met and briefed local artists who designed and made the pieces, using the participant’s oral testimonies and interviews as inspiration.

The special jigsaw represents things very close to participant Jane Fradley’s heart – Ant and Dec, Prince William… and her boyfriend Neil! It was made by local artist Annette Jamieson. Read more…

The eagle has landed…

21 May 2014 by Lucy

image of people looking at eagle

(l-r) Chris Lee and Chris Bliss (Liverpool ONE) and Paul Gallagher (Museum of Liverpool) admire the eagle

Today, we welcomed a new feathered friend to the Museum of Liverpool, who might just rival our life-size Liver Bird in popularity.

You may not know this, but in 1790, only seven years after winning its independence from Britain, the United States of America chose Liverpool as the site for its first ever consulate. The city’s growing transatlantic trade made it a vital partner for the USA, keen to exploit further commercial opportunities with Liverpool, Britain and beyond.  Read more…

My Family, My Pride: Maroon Ancestry

7 May 2014 by Andrew

An image of guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

Guest blogger Kirsty Fitzpatrick

I don’t remember the first time I heard about my Maroon ancestry, Mother would talk about Jamaica often, stories about farming, school or just sitting on the veranda watching the sun set but the Maroon heritage heartened every story. Bump Grave, the blowing of the abeng, warriors disguised as trees; stories of real people, their customs and traditions passed down to me through my Mother. I do remember feeling the immense pride in belonging to a group of such resilient, resourceful and spirited people. Read more…

Hillsborough remembered

15 April 2014 by Lucy

Picture showing 15/4/1989

The date of the Hillsborough tragedy will remain on the Museum of Liverpool until 21 April

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy.

Across Liverpool, people will be paying their respects by taking part in a minute’s silence at 3:06pm, the time the match was abandoned on 15 April, 1989.

All National Museums Liverpool venues will be recognising the minute’s silence.

Our guest blog today comes from our colleagues at the National Football Museum, who will also be joining with us at 3:06pm to remember the 96 people who lost their lives that day:   Read more…

15.4.1989 – A tribute

11 April 2014 by Lucy

Display of date on the Museum of Liverpool

The Museum of Liverpool’s commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy

15 April 2014 will mark 25 years since 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Hillsborough during the FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest.

The Museum of Liverpool – dedicated to telling the story of Liverpool and its people – is commemorating this date for all to see, recognising its significance and the city’s united grief for those who were lost but will never be forgotten.  Read more…

Tragic story of First World War soldier’s suicide

7 February 2014 by Kay

2014-LOGO-31-150x150

February is Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Trans History Month. To help represent and celebrate the lives and achievements of Liverpool’s LGBT community we are highlighting this story of Private William Mason, a King’s Liverpool Regiment soldier who served in the First World War.

Aged just 19, William Mason committed suicide in July 1916. William, from Birkenhead, had enlisted the previous year in Liverpool. He is one of almost 80,000 soldiers listed on our Kings Regiment World War I database. The following information is taken from a Liverpool Echo article, Tuesday 18 July, 1916, featured on the database. Read more…

Remembering the Jewish victims of the Holocaust

23 January 2014 by Lucy

Tablecloth

This tablecloth was donated to the Museum of Liverpool by the AJR in 2012

On 27 January each year, Holocaust Memorial Day is marked to remember the millions who have been murdered in the Holocaust and subsequent genocides.

This Sunday 26 January we will be holding special events at the Museum of Liverpool to remember the Jewish victims of the Holocaust.

In partnership with the Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR) there will be a variety of talks and tours taking place between 11am and 4pm, with a particular focus on memories of the Kindertransport.  Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Craig’s story

17 December 2013 by Kay

Craig Lundberg

Craig Lundberg

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our fourth and final instalment is Craig’s Lundberg’s story.

In 2007, Craig, a Lance Corporal with the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, led his men during a rooftop battle with insurgents in Basra. The 21 year-old was blinded by an exploding rocket-propelled grenade. After many months in hospital he recovered from his injuries but did not regain his sight. Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Jack Brunel Cohen’s story

10 December 2013 by Kay

Jack Cohen

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our third instalment is Jack’s story.

Jack Brunel Cohen was born in 1886. He was the Jewish great-nephew of Liverpool department store owner David Lewis. Jack and two of his brothers fought with the 5th Battalion, King’s Regiment during the First World War. He was wounded in action at Ypres and had both of his legs amputated. Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Highlighting people’s stories in the Museum of Liverpool

25 November 2013 by Kay

UK Disability History Month

UK Disability History Month is celebrated every year 22nd November-22nd December.

The theme for this year is ‘Celebrating our Struggle for Independent Living: No Return to Institutions or Isolation’.

Objects and people’s stories on display in the Museum of Liverpool will be featured on this blog throughout the month to celebrate.

The first is Mary’s story, which is featured in the Growing Up and Growing Older section of The People’s Republic gallery.

Mary discusses her life as a blind person and the limited expectations other people have of disabled people. (This is a shortened version of what is on display).

“I was born at the Women’s Hospital in August 1950, three months premature. I grew up in Aigburth. It was considered advisable that disabled children should go to school, mostly residential schools early as it was felt that parents couldn’t properly meet their needs, and they would be better socialised. I started school aged three at St Vincent’s. Most of the children lived in. Very few went home each weekend, like me, as it was frowned upon. I was taught Braille. The education was pretty abysmal. Most paritally-sighted children leaving school went into factory or shop work. It was expected they would have children. Those of us without sight weren’t expected to have children or relationships. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.