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Posts tagged with 'social history'

1984 – We need your help!

5 October 2010 by Lucy

The Museum of Liverpool is due to open next summer, 2011, and curators need your help!

One of the star features of the new museum will be an immersive film, taking visitors right into the heart of the city’s passion for football, exploring our unique connections to the game.

We are currently in the process of filming sequences for the film, and in order for it to be as authentic as possible, we need to borrow certain things. Read more…

The Talk of Toxteth

9 September 2010 by Lucy

As part of Heritage Open Days, National Museums Liverpool has a number of events taking place which will provide unique opportunities to explore and enjoy the sometimes hidden, often curious and always interesting areas of some of our venues.

Although not open until next year, the Museum of Liverpool team will also be taking part in this national initiative, in a special event tomorrow – Friday, 10 September – at Toxteth Town Hall from 10:30am – 4pm. Read more…

Mapping Memory

19 August 2010 by Laura B

Last month the ‘Mapping Memory: L1 and Liverpool’s central waterfront’ project began with its first workshop, kindly attended by the Liverpool Women’s History Group. The aim of the project is to explore memories of the L1 area during the 1950s, 60s and 70s and the Women’s History Group certainly provided an abundance of lively and interesting memories and stories for our researchers to collect.

The workshop started by asking the ladies to trace a particular route they would take through the L1 and central waterfront area, revealing a clustering around places such as Lord Street, Paradise Street and London Road. As the session progressed an array of collective memories showed how women used urban space during the twentieth century and the areas of the city which have created the most powerful and resilient memories over the years. Read more…

Free Talk – Forgotten Murals

16 August 2010 by Lucy

The well-loved icon of Liverpool department stores Lewis’s, sadly closed its doors for the last time at the end of May. Prior to that for around the last 30 years the store was mainly recognised for its shopping culture, but until the early 1980s it was much more than a place where you might buy a dress or new handbag.

Before the 80s the store also offered three restaurants and what was at one time the world’s largest hair salon on the fifth floor, until it was closed to the public in the 80s and used as a storage floor ever since. Read more…

History of World Museum Liverpool

6 May 2010 by Kay C

Thursday 6 May is the day people have been talking about all across Liverpool: it’s the day our public lecture series features the history of World Museum Liverpool.

Liverpool’s Museum – The First 150 Years is the first of three great talks lined up for this afternoon’s session. Presented by our Executive Director of Collections, John Millard, the event starts at 2pm in the Treasure House Theatre, World Museum, and is part of our celebrations in the museum’s 150th anniversary year. Read more…

Toys are Us!

13 April 2010 by Lucy

Every year, kids go crazy for one toy that then sells out everywhere and is nigh-on impossible for parents to get hold of. Remember that film Jingle All The Way, when Arnold Schwarzenegger spends the entire film trying to get hold of a Turbo Man for his son? That’s almost what it was like trying to get hold of a Tamagotchi for my brother’s eighth birthday…

However, the old ones were always the best, and as much as feeding a Tamagotchi, cleaning up after it, and making sure it had 100% happiness was fun (?!) the batteries did tend to run out after some time, much to our mum’s delight! Read more…

It’s Everlution!

12 March 2010 by Karen

Today is the anniversary of a momentous event for football fans in Liverpool and beyond. It was on this day in 1892 that Everton Football Club split in two, with half of the members leaving their home at Anfield and moving to a new site a few hundred yards away at Goodison Road, and the remaining members staying to form Liverpool Football Club.

The Everton Collection website features the actual minute book from 25 January 1892 that describes the members’ final offer to Mr Houlding, the owner of the ground they were currently leasing, and the resolution to move to Goodison Road if the offer was not accepted. The rest is history. There’s more on the Anfield Split as it came to be known, including the politics and personalities that contributed, in a special feature on the site. Read more…

Lewis’s heyday recalled in a new exhibition

22 February 2010 by Sam

photo of empty shop interior

Copyright Stephen King

Today the sad news was reported that after 154 years of trading the department store Lewis’s is to close.

Even without its famous cheeky statue, the store has dominated Renshaw Street as long as anyone can remember, as this photograph from the Stewart Bale collection shows. Several generations of local people have shopped and worked there.

The news of the closure adds extra poignancy to the stories told in the next exhibition to open at the National Conservation Centre, Lewis’s fifth floor: a department story. The exhibition features recent pictures by local photographer Stephen King of the faded glamour of a whole floor of Lewis’s which has not been open to the public since the 1980s. Read more…

Travelling cabinets

3 February 2010 by Lisa

The second story taken from the archives this week about World Museum, is from 1888. I’m not sure how our curators would feel about sending cabinets of precious specimens out to schools today, but at that time the museum’s ‘schools loans service’ provided a great way for children to learn about different types of artefacts while in the classroom.

A cabinet of animal specimens

A portable museum!

On 3 February 1888 John H Wood, Secretary of the Liverpool and District Teachers’ Association, wrote a letter to the museum in praise of its schools loan service: Read more…

Hide and seek at the museum!

2 February 2010 by Lisa

This week is a bumper week for our memories of the World Museum as we continue to pull out historic gems from the museum’s archives from the last 150 years. We have two interesting tales for this week in history. Firstly a report of ‘rowdyism and almost unimaginable crowds’ from 2 February 1935, when the Liverpool Post quoted museum director Dr. Douglas Allan complaining that the museum was overcrowded and disorderly on Sundays:

Black and white photo of Dr Douglas Allan writing

Dr. Douglas Allan: preferred promenading to hide-and-seek.

“…according to Dr. Allan, the number of people who crowd into the museum on Sundays is becoming unmanageable.  Many of the visitors are very young children, who occupy their time mainly in games of hide-and-seek… It is proposed, therefore, that children must be accompanied by guardians.  The limitation of the total attendance at any one time to a figure  consistent with both convenience and safety is also apparently desirable.  Is this thronging of the museum an indication that there are not sufficient facilities in other directions for indoor and outdoor relaxation on Sundays?” Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.