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Posts tagged with 'titanic'

Giant stories all year round in our Titanic exhibition!

3 October 2018 by Sam

Enormous wooden puppet of a diver, standing in the water by the Albert Dock

The Giant first arrived in Salthouse Dock back in April 2012. Photo © Pete Carr

With the discovery of a mysterious giant sandal last night, which is now suspended over the Canning Dock nearby, anticipation is building for the Giant Spectacular event in Liverpool this weekend. This will be the third and final time that the Royal de Luxe will take over the city to enchant and delight us with their epic tales. However did you know that their first visit to Liverpool back in 2012 was inspired by a simple letter from our Maritime ArchivesRead more…

Carpathia’s role remembered

19 July 2018 by Sam

metal nameplate with embossed lettering: SS Titanic

This week it is 100 years since RMS Carpathia was lost. The ship is of course best known for the role it played in the rescue of survivors from one of a much more famous liner – RMS Titanic.  In this guest blog, student Hannah Smith from the University of Liverpool explores the story through the nameplate of Titanic’s lifeboat No. 4:

“It is 100 years since RMS Carpathia was struck by three torpedoes from a German U-55, amid the Celtic Sea on 17 July 1918. Just six years earlier, on 15 April 1912 under the captaincy of Arthur Henry Rostron, the Cunard liner undoubtedly experienced its most memorable voyage. When Carpathia’s radio received the Titanic’s distress signal at 12.25 am she turned off her course to travel the 58 mile distance to the wreckage. From 4-8am all 705 survivors were brought aboard the Carpathia. Although sadly 1,503 people were to lose their lives in the sinking, without the Carpathia’s sense of urgency, the cold would have ultimately claimed more.  Read more…

Half term fun

24 May 2018 by Megan

 

Half-term is upon us and National Museums Liverpool has a fantastic range of activities to keep the whole family busy. Read more…

“He was a fine fellow”: Henry T Wilde and Titanic

17 April 2018 by Michelle

Henry T Wilde about 1900. Images are not to be reproduced without permission.

Sunday 15 April marked the anniversary of the sinking of RMS Titanic. At the time of her sinking she was the largest passenger ship in the world and the dramatic circumstances of her demise reverberated around the globe. In 1910 one ship in every 100 was lost, yet by 1912 technological advancements in shipbuilding led Titanic’s owners White Star Line to believe she was unsinkable.

This was not to be the case. Four days into her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York she struck an iceberg south-east of Newfoundland, and sank two hours and forty minutes later with the loss of over 1500 lives.

The sinking of Titanic is as famous as it is tragic and as such the individual impact of the disaster can be overshadowed by the catastrophic nature of the event.

Last week I was able to re-display some of Chief Officer Henry Wilde’s personal effects in our exhibition Titanic and Liverpool: the untold story. On display are his White Star Line cap, a pair of epaulettes and three letters; two to his eldest daughter Jennie and one to his children’s nanny. We are very privileged and honoured to be able to display these items and I would like to share his story with you.  Read more…

New Titanic performance at the Maritime

8 June 2017 by Emma Walmsley

Emma Walmsley as Carpathia passenger Hope Brown Chapin

Over the past few months, I have been working on a new performance Titanic – A Race to the Rescue, to add to our programme of public events linked to the incredibly popular Titanic and Liverpool: The untold story exhibition at the museum. The performance had its premiere on Sunday 11 June, but visitors can enjoy it again on Sunday 16 July.

I wanted to find a point of view about the story that we hadn’t really explored before so was very excited when I hit upon the idea of looking more closely into the experiences of passengers aboard the rescue vessel, CarpathiaRead more…

Remembering Britannic – Titanic’s sister ship

21 November 2016 by Ellie

Postcard of HMHS Britannic

DX/2108/4/3

Today marks the centenary of the sinking of White Star Line’s Britannic.

Built at Harland and Wolff’s shipyard in Belfast, she was the third of the Olympic-class passenger liners – sister ship to Olympic and Titanic.

Read more…

Lusitania 100 years later: never forget

9 July 2015 by Sam Vaux

Propaganda poster of the Lusitania sinking liner.

Following the war, the Lusitania was used as a propaganda tool. This dramatic image shows the sinking liner, while encouraging Irishmen to join an Irish regiment and ‘avenge the Lusitania’. © Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division/J Kent Layton Collection

This is the tenth and final blog post in a series by J Kent Layton, maritime historian and author of ‘Lusitania: an illustrated biography’, to accompany the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss, legacy at Merseyside Maritime Museum:

“The Titanic remains the most famous ocean liner disaster in history. Yet the sinking of the Lusitania is a subject that still fascinates us today. While both she and the Titanic suffered untimely demise, their lives and deaths could hardly have been more dissimilar. Read more…

Watches of a couple separated by the Titanic

19 November 2014 by Jen

Gold pocket watches belonging to Thomas and Ada Hewitt

These gold watches belonged to Thomas and Ada Hewitt; they were given to each other as gifts on their wedding day in 1902

A pocket watch belonging to a Liverpool man who died in the Titanic tragedy and his wife’s fob watch have been added to the award winning Titanic and Liverpool: the untold story exhibition. Displayed next to each other, the two gold watches of Thomas Hewitt and his wife Ada were exchanged by the couple as gifts on their wedding day in September 1902. Read more…

Raise the Titanic! …to the second floor

14 November 2014 by Jen

Titanic Model Case Being Dismantled

Dismantling the case

One of National Museums Liverpool’s most iconic objects – the Titanic builder’s model, has been on the move.  It has been on display for the last 8 years in the Titanic, Lusitania and the Forgotten Empress gallery. This gallery is now closed and will open again in March 2015 as a new gallery Lusitania: Life, Loss, Legacy.  The Titanic model has been moved up to the second floor to our award winning exhibition Titanic and Liverpool: the untold story.

But hang on a minute, just imagine the preparation and planning that goes into moving a very large (6 metres long, 1 metre wide, 1 metre tall), heavy (over half a ton), old (built in 1910), fragile (some parts are made from paper and card), and valuable object like this! For the last few months, colleagues from across divisions (Registration, Curatorial, Estates Management, Ship and Historic Models Conservation, Ship Keeping and Engineering, Exhibitions, Visitor Services) have been working hard on putting in place the logistics to ensure that the model was moved in the best and safest way possible: Read more…

Raising the Titanic… gallery improvements get underway

23 October 2014 by Dickie

youngsters peer at ship model of Titanic

Young visitors look at our Titanic model which is being moved

It’s going to be an even busier few months then usual for staff at the Merseyside Maritime Museum, as work starts on gallery improvements. Curator of Port History Ben Whittaker explains: Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.