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Remembering Liverpool’s First World War

11 November 2015 by Karen O'Rourke

old photo of a soldier in uniform

Captain Frank Watson

This week we have been commemorating those who lost their lives in conflict. With the centenary of the First World War, this year we have naturally been thinking of that war and the impact that it had on Liverpool. As I mentioned in my last blog post, this year Liverpool City Council and Culture Liverpool have created the Liverpool Remembers trail, to accompany the Poppies: Weeping Window installation at St George’s Hall. The trail highlights a number of Liverpool stories from across the city.

It was great to see that many people who came to see the installation at St George’s Hall when it opened this weekend then followed the Liverpool Remembers trail panels across town to the Pier Head. What they probably won’t realise is just how much work goes into making a city-wide trail happen. Read more…

Remembering the women on Poppy Day

5 November 2015 by Sam

woman in uniform

Iris M Newbould, Women’s Land Army © Lee Karen Stow

Photographer Lee Karen Stow shares the story of another one of the women she met during the research for her exhibition Poppies: Women and War, which is currently on display at the Museum of Liverpool.

Don’t forget that Lee will be back at the Museum to hold a free photography workshop and tour of the exhibition on Saturday 14 November. Full details of this and other events are on our Remembrance events page.

“In Whitehall, London, a few strides north of the Cenotaph and the tomb to the unknown soldier is the Monument to the Women of World War II. This tall, bronze pillar, sculpted by artist John W Mills, is a giant coat rack. Seventeen types of uniform, representing the roles thousands of women undertook during the war, hang on coat hooks, symbolising their job done. Unveiled by the Queen in 2005, this monument of recognition was a long time coming.

One of the uniforms represents members of the 80,000-strong Women’s Land Army (WLA). Women like Iris Newbould, now aged 90. Iris is one of the few ‘Land Girls’ still around to share memories Read more…

The ‘Angels of Pervyse’

27 October 2015 by Sam

poppies in a field in Flanders

© Lee Karen Stow

Photographer Lee Karen Stow shares the story of two brave women who she researched as part of her preparations for the exhibition Poppies: Women and War. You can see more of her photos and read about other women’s stories in the exhibition.

“This image of poppies growing in Flanders, marks the spot where Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm, the only women known to nurse on the Western Front in the First World War, saved countless lives. These heroic women, their stories largely forgotten, became two of the most famous women of the war.  Read more…

Nurse Edith Cavell

8 October 2015 by Sam

memorial with statue of nurse and inscription

Memorial statue to Nurse Edith Cavell in London’s Trafalgar Square © Lee Karen Stow

Photographer Lee Karen Stow tells the story of one of the women featured in her exhibition Poppies: Women and War at the Museum of Liverpool:

“The exhibition Poppies: Women and War honours one of the bravest women in the history of the First World War who was executed one hundred years ago this coming October 12.

Edith Louisa Cavell was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without discrimination and in helping some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium. She was executed by German Army firing squad at dawn on October 12, 1915 aged 50.  Read more…

Hiroshima survivors, 70 years on

5 August 2015 by Sam

portrait photo of 3 Japanese women

Hiroshimo survivors Ikuko, Teruko and Takako, iPhone photo taken after their portrait session © Lee Karen Stow

Two weeks ago photographer Lee Karen Stow opened her exhibition Poppies: Women and War at the Museum of Liverpool. The exhibition features the incredible personal stories of many women from all over the world who have been affected by war.

The Poppies project is an ongoing one, which has taken Lee to Japan this week to mark the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945. She reports from Japan on the eve of the anniversary:

“This photograph shows A-bomb hibakusha – survivors – Ikuko, Teruko and Takako. Each has shared their memories of the day of the bombing and what they experienced subsequently, in the hope that ours and future generations will cease to develop nuclear bombs and strive for a world of peace without wars.  Read more…

Strong and resilient women in Poppies exhibition

31 July 2015 by Karen O'Rourke

curator placing a book in a display cabinet

Installing objects in the exhibition, beneath a photo of Colonel Debbie Telford

It’s been a week since our Poppies: Women and War exhibition opened at the Museum of Liverpool. Every new exhibition we stage involves lots of preparation and in the weeks before we open it’s pretty chaotic for the team; agreeing final designs, getting all of the right objects and people in the right place at the right time and making all of the last minute arrangements. Fortunately we have an amazing team, who are all fabulous at what they do.

I have one of the best jobs, which is that I get to watch the reaction of the visitors as they see the exhibition for the first time and this week I have spoken to lots of people who have all had positive things to say. Read more…

Research First World War family history

4 September 2014 by Lucy

Image of boy trying on helmet

Our City Soldiers gallery features a range of military headware to try on

Come along to the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday from 10:30am – 4:30pm for a free First World War Family History Event.

There’s loads going on, including a trench erected in the Museum’s atrium, and an Edwardian School Mistress will also be on hand to teach people about the causes of the First World War.  Read more…

City Soldiers – The DePeyster Collection

13 June 2012 by Lucy

Introducing Jamie McFadden, who’s been helping us out in the Press Office this week, and researching a very interesting talk that’s coming up tomorrow at the Museum of Liverpool.

The King’s Regiment has been involved in conflicts and battles around the world since the 1700s. Over the years, members of the Regiment have collected ‘Trophies of War’ and the further back in time we go, the more extravagant these trophies become.

National Museums Liverpool has a long-term loan of collections from the King’s Regiment that are currently exhibited in the City Soldiers gallery at the Museum of Liverpool. Some of the items in the collection date back to conflicts hundreds of years ago between British and American forces in an attempt to protect British overseas colonies. Read more…

Maritime Tale – Lusitania Survivor

4 May 2012 by Stephen

Painting of Lusitania

A contemporary postcard of Lusitania

The Lusitania story is one of my favourites because not only does the disaster seem unbelievable to this day but because this was Liverpool’s favourite liner.

At my local church – St James’s in West Derby – you can see a unique glass memorial with an image of Lusitania prominently included to symbolise Liverpool’s suffering in the Great War. Read more…

Captain Noel Chavasse VC & Bar, MC (1884 – 1917)

23 March 2012 by Lucy

Tomorrow, is our First World War Family History Day at the Museum of Liverpool, and you may know that we have been blogging all week about WWI soldiers from the city. Today, we’re featuring Captain Noel Chavasse, who was the only soldier in WWI to receive the honour of the Victoria Cross twice.

Photograph of Captain Noel Chavasse

Captain Noel Chavasse won the Victoria Cross twice

The son of the Bishop of Liverpool, Noel was twice awarded the Victoria Cross (VC) and was the most highly decorated British serviceman in the First World War. Read more…

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