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Posts tagged with 'world museum collections'

Trinidad and Tobago herbarium specimens join the botany collection

15 March 2017 by Wendy

Pitch lake

Pitch lake

The recent acquisition to World Museum’s herbarium of 131 specimens from the islands of Trinidad and Tobago has been an interesting and welcome addition to Botany’s collection. Prior to acquiring this collection, we had less than 100 specimens from Trinidad and Tobago, the vast majority of these being a collection of grasses.

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas collections at World Museum, collected the herbarium specimens, along with colleagues on the islands, during field work for her research project on wooden artefacts that have been found in Trinidad’s Pitch Lake. Read more…

The King of Kaputa: life as a trader in 19th century Africa

21 December 2016 by Zachary

Eshira beaded belt with English-made metal buckle, collected in Gabon by J.G.C. Harrison and said to have been made by the niece of a King named Ngorlay.

The Harrison group of Central African objects can now be seen online. It is an important early collection, because it is unusually well documented for its time. The museum’s records relating to Harrison’s donations, which were made in 1879 and 1883, are still relatively brief but they suggest that Harrison acquired the artefacts through his close personal relationships with Central Africans.  Read more…

Jars for the afterlife

12 September 2016 by Lynn

Canopic jarsThe first in a series of blogs from Marion Servat-Fredericq, Assistant Curator of Antiquities, reveals aspects of the fascinating culture of Ancient Egypt through some objects from our collection.

“We have put some of the most popular objects from our Egyptian collection on display online while the Ancient Egypt gallery is closed for extensive refurbishment.  This beautiful set of Egyptian canopic jars, also on display in the atrium, give us insight into Egyptian beliefs about the afterlife. Read more…

All creatures great and small: netsuke at World Museum

9 September 2016 by Emma Martin

Emma and Helen installing netsuke on the new mount

Emma and Helen installing netsuke on the new mount

Last week we re-displayed some of our new Japanese netsuke in the World Cultures gallery in World Museum. This wonderful collection of carved toggles was given to the museum in memory of the well-known 20th century collector Jonas Goro Gadelius.

Each year we refresh the display bringing a new group of netsuke out from the stores. This year I chose the theme ‘mini beasts’ and we now have a new mount inspired by a bonsai tree. Read more…

Piecing together an excavation

6 September 2016 by Chrissy Partheni

The excavation at Kouklia in progress

The excavation at Kouklia in progress

My mother is from the town of Morphou in Cyprus and I therefore have always felt a special connection with the Cypriot collections in the antiquities department. One significant group is material from Kouklia, from a joint excavation between our museum and St. Andrews University. The excavation was ambitious and of significant scale and attracted a lot of media attention as a result. It was undertaken across five successive seasons from 1950 – 1955. It’s hard to imagine museums having the resource to undertake such a large excavation today in the current economic climate.  Read more…

Selim Aga: African-born explorer

30 August 2016 by Zachary

Nupe gown from Bida collected by Selim Aga in about 1857 (20.11.60.2).

Nupe gown from Bida collected by Selim Aga in about 1857 (20.11.60.2).

After Liverpool Museum opened in its new building on William Brown Street in October 1860 (now World Museum), the first five African artefacts it acquired a month later were purchased from the African-born explorer Selim Aga. Aga acquired these five artefacts in the interior of Nigeria on the voyage of the Dayspring. You can find out more about Selim Aga and see the items he collected in our new Selim Aga online collection.

The Niger Expedition ship the Dayspring, built at Lairds in Birkenhead 1857.

The Niger Expedition ship the Dayspring, built at Lairds in Birkenhead 1857.

But the objects in this group only hint at Aga’s remarkable life as an explorer. Read more…

Our classical collections feature in Biennial exhibition at Tate Liverpool

27 July 2016 by Andrew

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

In April, we told you about Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Antiquities at World Museum and her involvement with this year’s Biennial in Liverpool – read it here. Working alongside curators at Tate Liverpool and Biennial, we were able to loan objects from our classical collections, in particular from Henry Blundell’s sculptural collections, forming part of the Biennial Ancient Greece Episode exhibition there. Chrissy says: Read more…

Liverpool’s Tibet collection goes live!

15 March 2016 by Emma Martin

Meditation painting or thangka

Meditation painting or thangka sold to the museum in 1905 by Sergeant J Heaney on his return to Liverpool after participating in the Mission to Lhasa

It’s a little known fact that Liverpool has one of the world’s great Tibet collections. Liverpool doesn’t seem like the obvious choice for a Tibet collection; you might think of Liverpool’s maritime connections rather than it’s Himalayan ones. But 19th century missionaries, soldiers and explorers did sell or donate Tibetan objects to Liverpool having arrived in its port after a long journey from India. Read more…

The night World Museum nearly died

26 February 2016 by Emma Martin

The upper horseshoe gallery was home to the natural history collections in 1941. In pride of place was Don Pedro, the Indian elephant

The upper horseshoe gallery was home to the natural history collections in 1941. In pride of place was Don Pedro, the Indian elephant.

Over the next few weeks Lolo, a student working at World Museum, will blog about the events of the 3rd May 1941 – the night World Museum nearly died. Here at the museum we are preparing to launch an on-line exhibition on the 3rd May. We will recount what happened that night 75 years ago and Lolo will also be writing blogs that reveal in more depth what happened to some of the museum’s objects. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.