Blog

Lessons in 19th century life sciences

21 July 2017 by Donna

Over the last year I have had the pleasure of working alongside David Gelsthorpe, Curator of Earth Science Collections at Manchester Museum, in developing a new temporary exhibition – Object Lessons.

‘Object Lessons’, at Manchester Museum.

The exhibition at Manchester Museum showcases the wonderful private collection of 19th century natural science teaching objects and illustrations that has been assembled by art collector George Loudon.

All of the items on display were originally created to increase understanding of the natural world through education, demonstration and display. They resulted from collaborations between leading scientists and accomplished craftsmen. Over time many of these items have lost their educational function, but they can now be viewed from a fresh perspective and appreciated for their intrinsic and beguiling beauty.  George has built up his collection with an expert and detailed eye for the aesthetic and creative value of the objects.  Read more…

Excavating in Kouklia, Cyprus

11 July 2017 by Chrissy Partheni

Manor House now used as the Museum building at Kouklia.

Nothing beats visiting archaeological sites and taking part in live excavations. While working on digitising the material from the Kouklia 1950s excavations in our collections I contacted Professor Maria Iacovou from the University of Cyprus about the Palaepaphos Urban Landscape Project (PULP) and current excavations at Kouklia in Cyprus as part of my documentation. I was delighted when Maria kindly invited me to visit the site and meet members of the team.

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Animals in the ancient Near East

28 June 2017 by Scott Smith

Jug in the form of a kneeling bull

Jug in the form of a kneeling cow or bull

The ancient Near East was a region that roughly corresponds to the modern Middle East (including Iraq, Turkey, Iran and Syria). World Museum’s Ancient Near East collection contains antiquities from the pre-classical civilisations of the ancient Near East and a selection of highlights from the collections is now available to view online for the first time…

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Revealing classical treasures at World Museum

6 June 2017 by Chrissy Partheni

The classical relief now visible in World Museum’s new cafe. The inscription reads Deus Nobis Haec Otia Fecit: God has given us these days of leisure.

I will never forget my first impression of Liverpool, almost 18 years ago. The impressive architecture of the city with its classical references was definitely an attraction to a Greek. But while it is easy to spot the classical influences on the exterior of Liverpool’s buildings, we often miss their interior decoration. The extension of our brand new café into the Mountford building is an excellent opportunity to view such prime examples and to perhaps think of the reasons why classical antiquity imagery became such an important narrative of civic pride and glory in 19th century Liverpool.

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The pitfalls of recreating a pit burial

30 May 2017 by Alex Blakeborough

The final put burial display.

The final pit burial display.

What colour should the sand be? This was just one of the many things we had to think about when installing the pit burial case for the new Ancient Egypt gallery.

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Making connections through online collections

18 May 2017 by Emma Martin

A chod pan is worn by Tibetan Buddhist monks or lamas during religious ceremonies. The five panels feature the tathagatas or the Five Celestial Buddhas.

Sometimes, correcting mistakes found in the museum’s records leads to new and completely unexpected connections. This recently happened to me. I’ve spent more than ten years working my way through the Tibet collections here at World Museum. As I document the collections I try and fill in some of the gaps in our knowledge: do I know who made the object (often I don’t)? Do I know who once owned the objects (sometimes I do)? How did they collect the object? What do we know about the collector who sold or donated the objects to the museum? Read more…

Dementia Awareness Week 2017 at National Museums Liverpool

17 May 2017 by Emma Riley

Image © Robin Clewley

This week (15 – 21 May) is Dementia Awareness Week – an annual event organised by Alzheimer’s Society as an opportunity for everyone across England, Wales and Northern Ireland to unite against dementia. Read more…

The oldest Australian night parrot

9 May 2017 by Clem Fisher

Australian Night Parrot

The Australian night parrot specimen at World Museum.

National Museums Liverpool was founded in 1851 after the bequest to the people of Liverpool of an internationally important collection of birds and mammals belonging to Edward Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby, of Knowsley Hall near Liverpool. Amongst this unique collection is a little green-and-yellow parrot…

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Spring into the bank holiday weekend at National Museums Liverpool

27 April 2017 by Laura

Those three little words we all long to hear – bank holiday weekend! Read more…

Story of the sun god’s daughter

18 April 2017 by Scott Smith

Our handling team getting ready to move the Sekhmet statue.

The team getting ready to move the Sekhmet statue. © Pete Carr

It seemed no coincidence that the sun shone bright on the day that we moved our statues of the Egyptian goddess Sekhmet, daughter of sun god Ra, from World Museum’s atrium to their new home in our Ancient Egypt: A journey through time gallery.

Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.